Free Training: Migrating Texts: Innovation and Technology in Subtitling, Translation and Adaptation

Migrating Texts: Innovation and Technology in Subtitling, Translation and Adaptation

Friday 4 May 2018 | IMLR, Room 243, Senate House, London WC1E 7HU

***Free training generously supported by LAHP (London Arts & Humanities Partnership), the European Commission and IMLR (The Institute of Modern Languages Research)***

Please join us for our next Migrating Texts event, aimed specifically at postgraduate students and ECRs researching in the Modern Languages and Arts and Humanities, and to practitioners in these fields. Migrating Texts brings together academic speakers with individuals from the subtitling, translation and cross-media industries, with the aim of fostering communication between the two and promoting opportunities for collaboration between academia and the cultural industries. Our forthcoming event will focus on innovation and technology.

In the last decades, advances in digital communications and innovative technologies have deeply transformed the way texts are created and travel across material, linguistic, spatial and temporal boundaries. This is particularly evident in the everchanging landscape of the audiovisual translation (AVT) sector, but translation practices in publishing and theatre, for example, have also been affected. What tools were available to translation practitioners before the digital revolution? What can we learn from the transition from analogue to digital production? How has online software reformed translators’ access to work and their modus operandi? How has the job market adapted to the demand for a new profile of translator who is at the same time a language-cultural expert and tech-savvy? What new forms of adaptation are available today?

The subtitling session will explore advances in subtitling practice from a diachronic perspective. It will first discuss the origins and nature of written language on screen and the key role played by early, often non-professional, translators in the international circulation of moving images. It will then observe more recent technical developments in both textual and professional practice, underlining issues surrounding quality standards and access to the job market.

The translation and adaptation session will explore changes to reading, writing and publishing occasioned by technological innovation, from the ways we do translation (e.g. computer-aided translation methods) to the ways translations and adaptations are disseminated (e.g. digital storytelling platforms). The session concludes with a practical exercise where attendees will adapt a text for a digital storytelling platform.

For more information on the speakers, please see the Migrating Texts website:

https://migratingtexts.wordpress.com/about-the-speakers/

Attendance is free. You may register your place through the IMLR website:

https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14045

We look forward to seeing you there!

The Migrating Texts team: Carla, Katie, Kit

Website: migratingtexts.wordpress.com

Twitter: @MigratingTexts | Facebook: migratingtexts | Email: migratingtexts@gmail.com

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Call for Papers: Are we Living in an Age of Distraction? – Deadline: 26 April 2018

Call for Papers: Are we Living in an Age of Distraction?

Graduate Student Conference
Organized by Birkbeck Institute of Humanities, Birkbeck Institute for Social Research and Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality

Birkbeck, University of London (Room, TBA)
Keynote Speakers TBA

8 & 9 June 2018

Deadline: 26 April 2018
Please send a 200 word abstract for papers of 15 minutes and a 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk

This conference explores distraction and all its meanings and implications. Distraction is commonly thought of as a growing concern or even a sickness of modern society and digital culture. From mindless scrolling to heavy consumerism, the pursuit for entertainment and satisfaction is insatiable, leaving us vulnerable to ruling corporations. Does our lack of control transform us into a conformed mass that is susceptible to tabloid media and the rise of populism? On the other hand, distraction is not necessarily steeped in negativity. In fact, it has had a long and fascinating history. Its German equivalent, ‘Zerstreuung’, comes from the idea of dispersion. At the start of the twentieth-century, Walter Benjamin defined the term as ‘floating attention’, where experience is caused by chance rather than concentration. Does lack of focus in fact allow a sense of freedom and inspiration?

Age of Distraction is a chance for an enriching discussion between MA, PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines.

Topics to include:

  • History of distraction
  • Distraction and its oppositions
  • Distraction and/in Education
  • Distraction and madness
  • Modes of Extremism: online or in reality?
  • Democracy, populism, and online social networking
  • Freedom of speech v. government and/or regulatory control
  • Misinformation and fake news
  • Dystopia/ an Orwellian society
  • Distraction and creativity
  • Escapism, dream and day-dream
  • Feigned ignorance or ‘Turning a blind eye’
  • Emotional responses
  • Procrastination, boredom and solitude
  • Wandering and ‘killing time’
  • Inspiration, chance and serendipity

Of course, distraction can be considered from numerous perspectives:

Arts and Humanities

Distraction as a literary theme can be found in many forms, from dystopia to escapist fiction. Reading itself has been thought to have a negative impact on cognitivity and morality, the development of the popular novel suspected as a dangerous commodity. After WW1, new cinema and photography brought a wave of anxiety about modern man’s splintered focus and new perceptions. Distraction could also be a curse and blessing to the creative process, especially in the pursuit of originality. Diderot wrote in his Encyclopédie that: ‘Distraction arises from an excellent quality of the understanding, which allows the ideas to strike against, or reawaken one another’. How does this statement apply to areas such as writing, painting or film-making? Is writer’s block and procrastination a suspended state in which ideas are waiting to ‘reawaken’ or simply a result of laziness and denial?

Social Sciences

Although social media has given a platform to previously unheard voices, it is also susceptible to manipulation, as recent scandals have made clear. In this context, to what extent can social media still be considered a progressive platform for political action?  Should social media be regulated, and if so how, by whom and on what criteria? Does today’s open platform really represent shared global perspectives, or does it magnify the voice of those who already have power and influence? How does use of social media relate to dominant economic ideologies, and the ‘neoliberalisation’ of leisure time and social relations?

There is widespread concern that social media can be a major source of ‘mass distraction from real life conditions. Today’s technological advances raise a number of concerns: In what ways do social media influence public opinion and political participation, and do they provide channels for public deliberation? Is scepticism becoming dominant in response to the rise of the concept of ‘fake news’? Are social scientists equipped with adequate theoretical tools to make sense of the sociopolitical changes accompanying unceasingly evolving communication technologies?

Law and Criminology  

Distraction is also relevant to our legal and criminal justice system. Last year, the English High Court in Monroe v Hopkins [2017] EWHC had to decide what constitutes ‘serious harm’ following a Twitter war between Jack Monroe and Katie Hopkins. Legislatures around the world are examining Facebook’s internal policies and procedures as they relate to the dissemination of extremist material, hate speech and bullying. Constitutionally protected rights to freedom of speech and expression are clashing with individual claims asking for respect for private and family life.  What is becoming clear is that traditional legal frameworks regulating twentieth century media are not adapt to a twenty first century world. From this perspective, the law now needs to consider both ‘the distracted’ and ‘the distractor’. Inevitably, topics that critically engage with privacy and surveillance, control society and fundamental human rights need to be discussed.

Food and refreshments will be available.

The annual Birkbeck Graduate Conference is organised by the the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality. The Institutes’ interns for the current academic year take the lead on organising the conference.

Meet our interns for 2017-18: Azzam Al Kassir, Harooon Forde, Devin Frank, Pauline Suwanban.

We are currently recruiting PhD students to join the Working Party to help organise the conference. If you are a current Birkbeck PhD student and are interested in gaining the experience of organising an international conference please contact us on .

Previous conferences:

 

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Call for Papers: *DICKENS DAY* – deadline: 31st May 2018

*DICKENS DAY*

Saturday 20th October 2018, Senate House, London.

CFP: Dickens, Families and Communities

Dickens often associated his own works with a cheerful ideology of hearth and home. Writing to his friend John Forster on plans for a new periodical, he promised that it would have ‘a vein of glowing, hearty, generous, mirthful, beaming reference in everything to Home, and Fireside’. Yet, many of the families in Dickens’s fiction are far from mirthful. From Mrs Joe going on the rampage to the murderous Jonas Chuzzlewit, the Dickensian family is as conflict-ridden as it is cosy. And, for Dickens, family is a particularly flexible concept, ranging from the nuclear to the extended, encompassing elective families, diverse gender roles, child-carers and surrogate-parents. Dickens’s writing is frequently concerned also with those without families: orphans, singletons, and those alienated from others by choice or circumstance.

Dickens’s wider communities are equally eclectic. In prefaces and journalism, he makes appeals to his ‘community of readers’, a virtual community linked through his writings. He participated in other more tangible communities, as an author, journalist, social reformer, and actor in amateur dramatic performances. And he wrote of diverse forms of community: gangs, clubs, the parish, the nation, and religious, political and cultural societies.

Jointly run by Birkbeck, Cardiff University, the Dickens Fellowship and the Institute of English Studies, this one-day conference will explore all aspects of Dickens, Families and Communities. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in response to the theme and warmly encourage Dickensians and scholars of all backgrounds and career stages to apply.

Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Hearth and home: happy families
  • Threats to and within the family
  • Alienated from the family: illegitimacy, orphans, solitary individuals
  • Adoptive and elective families
  • Dickens’s own family
  • Dickens’s community of readers
  • Nation, empire and other imagined communities
  • Institutional communities: orphanages, schools, prisons, workhouses, parliament and the courts
  • Criminal and transgressive families
  • Privileged and underprivileged communities
  • Clubs, societies, lodgers, friends, neighbours and other networks
  • Amateur dramatics, fictional and non-fictional theatrical communities

Please send proposals (maximum 500 words) to Bethan Carney (bethan.carney@gmail.com), Holly Furneaux (furneauxh@cardiff.ac.uk) and Ben Winyard (benwinyard@hotmail.com).

The deadline for paper proposals is 31st May 2018.

 

 

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Funding: Venetian Research Programme: British and Commonwealth Applicants – deadline 1st May 2018

Venetian Research Programme:

British and Commonwealth Applicants

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation – British and Commonwealth Committee – announces its 2018-2019 programme of grants for study based on travel to and research in Venice and the Veneto and other territories of the former Venetian Republic.

Grants will be awarded for historical research on Venice and its empire, and for the study of contemporary Venetian society and culture. Applicants from all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences are eligible for areas of study including, but not limited to: anthropology; archaeology; architecture; art; bibliography; economics; history; history of science; law; literature; music; political thought; religion; theatre; film and television. Applications for research on the environment and conservation are welcomed. Other relevant research interests will be considered.

The application deadline for the British and Commonwealth Programme is 1st May 2018.

Applications should be submitted online at http://delmas.org/grants/venetian-program-grants/venetian-research-program-british-commonwealth/

The awards will be announced by the early summer.

Eligible applicants must:

  • Be citizens or permanent residents of Great Britain or the Commonwealth, and/or be enrolled for research at a British or Commonwealth university, and/or be permanent or affiliated members of a British or Commonwealth university. Experienced curatorial or conservation staff at British or Commonwealth galleries and museums are also welcome to apply.
  • Have experience of research at graduate level or equivalent. If a doctoral student, to have fulfilled all doctoral requirements before completion of the thesis.

Grants for the maximum amount – normally £5000.00 – are rarely awarded. Funding is granted primarily for transportation and accommodation, but additional research expenses may also be considered. Scholars who have already received and accepted a Delmas grant are eligible to apply for grants, normally for one month, to continue the work related to the previous grant, focused on Venetian material in libraries, archives, museums or galleries outside Venice. Applicants must not submit for funding for both grants within the same year.

Applicants must notify the Committee immediately upon receipt of any other grant for research in the same area.

Any person who has accepted three or more Delmas grants for Venetian research (regardless of amount or timing) will be ineligible for consideration for two programme years after the previous grant. Thereafter, the two-year hiatus continues to apply after each grant.

All successful applicants must submit a report to the Chairman within three months of completing their funded period of research. Failure to do so will render applicants ineligible for future Delmas funding.

How to apply

The Foundation is now using a two-step online application form.
Step 1: Register by providing your contact information and creating a login.
Step 2: Fill in the online application.  After your application has been submitted, you may log in to monitor the arrival of your Letters of Recommendation. Make sure you have given your referees ample notice of your intention to apply and the nature of your research.

 

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CFP: The Literary Self: from Antiquity to the Digital Age – deadline 10 April 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Literary Self: from Antiquity to the Digital Age

A postgraduate conference hosted by the University of Edinburgh on 4-5 June 2018.

Generously supported by the Institute for Academic Development, the Scottish Graduate School for Arts and Humanities and the School of Classics at the University of St Andrews.

Keynote: Professor Simon James, Durham University
Other confirmed speakers: Dr Roger Rees, University of St Andrews

Throughout history authors have grappled with how their texts are presented to their audience. Critics and theorists have responded to this in kind with a multitude of diverging approaches to the author in a text and the nature of the self generally. However, very few of these approaches have come to bear upon the literary nature of our online identities, whether it’s the lexical semantics and rhetoric of our online existences or indeed the literary value that such existences might produce. Our conference will examine approaches to authorship and selfhood through time and culminate in roundtable discussions of their applicability in our digital age.

We will have panels grounded in the Classical, Medieval and Early Modern, and Modern periods and invite papers from all disciplines.

As the conference is interdisciplinary we encourage papers that examine the literary self in a specific field or time period but also have applicability to a wide audience. Speakers who are successful will have the opportunity to publish their proceedings in FORUM: University of Edinburgh Postgraduate Journal of Culture and the Arts.

Paper topics might consider:
• Biographies, autobiographies, and the mythology of authorial persona
• The psychology of literary identity
• Digital humanities and the networks of reception
• Ontological philosophies of selfhood
• The media of self-presentation (e.g. papyri, codices, books, social media, or e-books)
• The linguistics of expression and repression

Thanks to the generosity of the Scottish Graduate School for Arts and Humanities, the Institute for Academic Development, and the School of Classics at the University of St Andrews, we can provide a limited amount of funding for travel from your home institution. Lunch and refreshments will also be provided.

Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words to literaryself2018@gmail.com by 10 April 2018.
You will be notified by email by mid to late-April of the submission outcomes.

Conference Organisers
Caitlan Smith (St. Andrews), Consuelo Martino (St. Andrews), Matthew Tibble (Edinburgh), Miles Beard (Strathclyde)

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CFP: Representing Gender in the North: 1945 to the present day – Deadline 3 April 2018

The University of Sheffield 23.5.18

Call for Papers

“When he saw this Tom was so full of himself that he had to share the pleasure with somebody, so he turned to a woman sitting across the aisle.

“There it is, missus.”

Surprised, the woman looked across him at him.

“You what, love?”

Tom nodded towards the panorama through the front window.

“The North.”

The woman looked, saw nothing, then observing that they were alone

thought it best to humour him.

“Yes, love. Very nice.”

And she stood up and went downstairs.”

Barry Hines, First Signs, (London: Michael Joseph, 1972), p.89

“Representing Gender in the North: 1945 to the present day” is a one-day conference which is to be held at the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield on 23 May 2018.  The conference focuses on prose, poetry, film, theatre, and television.   Contributions are warmly welcomed from established scholars and post-graduate students alike.  We invite abstracts of 300 words (please send to rlhughes@shef.ac.uk)  by 3 April 2018. Topics for discussion include but are not limited to the following:

Representations of gender in the town or in the country

Ethnicity in the North

Northern authorship

LGBTQ representations

The post-industrial

Displacement and/or the returning native

Class

The teenager or the Bildungsroman

Stereotypes/stereotyping

Dialect and gender

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CFP: ASMI POSTGRADUATE SUMMER SCHOOL – Deadline 9 April 2018

University of Warwick

21 – 22 June, 2018

The ASMI Postgraduate Summer School provides a forum for postgraduate students and early career scholars in the field of Italian Studies to share their research and test their ideas.

We welcome proposals for papers on any aspect of Modern Italian history, politics, society and culture, from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century and from any academic discipline.

Participants will present their papers in panel sessions and then receive feedback from senior scholars and junior colleagues in a welcoming and supportive environment.

Papers can be in English or Italian and should be no more than 20 minutes in length.
Please send an abstract (max 250 words) and a short biography (max 100 words) to the conference organisers at asmi.summerschool.2018@gmail.com by Monday 9th April 2018.
The Summer School programme will include two keynote lectures and a training session (speakers to be confirmed).

The Summer School is free to all members of ASMI. ASMI membership is offered at a discounted rate of £20 per calendar year to students and the unwaged, and includes subscription to the journal Modern Italy (http://www.asmi.org.uk/membership/).

A limited number of travel grants will be available. For information, please contact the organisers at asmi.summerschool.2018@gmail.com
The organising committee: Gianmarco Mancosu (University of Warwick), Daniela Zanini (School of Advanced Study, University of London), Emiliano Zappalà (University of Warwick), Kate Devine (Royal Holloway, University of London).

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JAWS Introduction to Publishing in Journals – Wed 7 March 2018

07 Mar 2018

6pm to 8pm

As part of the Research Fortnight, this event is being held for students of all levels who are interested in publishing their work in Journals, and finding out about what being a Journal Editor entails.

Robert Gadie and Ruth Solomons, Editors for the Journal of Arts Writing by Students (JAWS), published by Intellect, will speak about how the peer review and editing process works, and how they accommodate submissions of practice i.e. practice-based articles. JAWS is dedicated to publishing the work of MA and PhD students across the arts, and has a dedicated community of student peer reviewers, which they are always looking to expand.

The event will conclude with a panel discussion and Q&A of Editors from UAL: Dr Ana Bilbao Yarto, Editor for Afterall Journal; Professor Susan Orr, Editor for Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education Journal; Catherine Smith, Editor for Spark; UAL Creative Teaching and Learning Journal; Chris Smith, Associate Editor for the Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and Ruth Solomons, Journal of Arts Writing by Students.

For more information and bookings, please click on the following link: http://events.arts.ac.uk/event/2018/3/7/Introduction-to-Publishing-in-Journals/ 

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Chase Creative Writing BAME Masterclass – Deadline 18 March 2018

Applications are invited to attend a Chase funded residency for creative writers in May. One week at a beautiful modernist barn conversion in Norfolk for creative writing PhD students. It will include a masterclass by the extraordinary Sarah Hall, as well as student led workshops and classes. There will also be plenty of time for students to work on their own writing and also to get to know one another, swim in the pool, enjoy the gardens etc. It’s open to all creative writing or creative/critical writing PhD candidates (whether or not funded).

http://www.chase.ac.uk/creative-writing-residency

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CFP: Spain: Social Movements Between Past and Present – Deadline 23 March 2018

University of Cambridge

8th June 2018

Social movements in Spain have increasingly attracted academic and popular attention over the last years. Political mobilisations are frequently treated as spontaneous phenomena, divorced from their wider social and historical contexts, as testified by much of the recent commentary on the 15M/Indignados movement and recent Catalan separatism. There is little interaction between those studying activism in the transformative decades of la transición española and those researching contemporary social movements. This can mean that their lessons and wider significance are lost. Historians of popular politics are also often reluctant to relate their research to contemporary events or to acknowledge the influence of present movements on the collective and academic memory. Our workshop is partly a response to social movement theorists’ suggestion that we attend to a particular mobilisation´s temporal, spatial and transnational dynamics to gain a deeper understanding of the movement itself and the societal changes it sheds light on.

This workshop will allow participants – PhD students and early-career academics – to reflect on social movements in Spain from the mid-twentieth century to the present, linking between past and present in important themes of mobilisation in contemporary Spain. It will help lay the ground for dialogue between scholars of Spanish history and politics from a diverse array of disciplines and intellectual contexts. Speakers will have twenty minutes to present their paper followed by comments and questions lead by an established academic. We will proceed with a roundtable discussion.

We aim to facilitate discussion on a variety of topics related to Spanish social movements, including but not limited to:

  • Gender and sexuality
  • Relations between social movements and institutions
  • Nationalisms
  • Urban Infrastructure
  • Youth Activism
  • Student movement
  • Memory
  • Labour and trade unions
  • Relations between actors
  • Movements and political parties

How to apply: Please send abstracts of up to 250 words and a short biography (max.200 words) to Roseanna Webster (rw561@cam.ac.uk) and/or Tiago Carvalho (tmlc3@cam.ac.uk) by March 23rd, 2018.

 

Limited funding to cover travel and accommodation is available.

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