From Field to Page: Core Skills in the Medical Humanities 5 July and 8 November 2018

From Field to Page: Core Skills in the Medical Humanities 

CHASE Cohort Training Days

July 5th & November 8th 2018

Keynes Library

School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Medical humanities continues to emerge as a live and transforming field of enquiry.  The core work of this field seeks to explore and critique biomedical science and its histories through the various critical frameworks of the humanities disciplines.  Medical humanities research presents scholars with the particular challenges of transdisciplinary research undertaken across the radically different domains of medicine and the humanities’ academic disciplines.  Across the CHASE institutions there is a diverse cohort of medical humanities doctoral researchers that incorporates students from both clinical and non-clinical, humanities backgrounds. As such the cohort represents a broad range of skills-sets, work, academic and training experiences, and previous exposure to the critical methods central to the humanities disciplines. Clinicians come into the field of research with substantial situated knowledge of the real-life settings and practices of medicine and surgery but often with the need to acquire, through training the requisite skills of critical thinking and writing.  Conversely, non-clinicians and humanities’ scholars are much better versed in critical practice and inquiry, but lack the grounded, lived experience of clinical practice. The range of research projects undertaken in the field is markedly diverse, ranging from practice-led (examining the nature of clinical practice), to practice-based (using clinical practice as research), to purely analytic (discursive analysis) modes of inquiry but all undertake to situate medicine, disease, patient experience, clinical practice and medical education within socio-cultural and/or historical contexts in such a way that critical analysis and discursive understandings may be produced. The aims of medical humanities theses may, or may not, have the avowed intention of contributing to the practical fields of clinical practice, delivery of healthcare or medical education. All medical humanities theses must adhere to the core methodologies and practices of the humanities disciplines and this means that critical thinking and writing skills are key requirements of the medical humanities doctorate.

The CHASE Consortium will deliver two training days, which map the core skills required of medical humanities doctoral research and support doctoral researchers as they undertake their projects.

Registration for both days is free and open to all PhD students at CHASE institutions.

There are 10 travel bursaries available for students without CHASE funding, these will be awarded on a first come, first served basis.

To register, please contact Jo Winning, j.winning@bbk.ac.uk by 25th June 2018

Programme

Day 1, July 5tth 2018

10.15-10.30am:  Coffee and Registration

10.30-11.15am:  Keynote Lecture 1: Mapping the field (Jo Winning, Birkbeck)

11.15am-12.30pm:  The challenges of transdisciplinarity and the problems of language (Birkbeck/Wellcome ISSF Medical Humanities Fellows)

12.30-1.30pm:  Lunch

13.30-2.30pm:  Open Space to discuss the morning sessions

2.30-3.45pm:  Working with stakeholders: public engagement and impact (Ross Macfarlane, Wellcome; Deborah Padfield, St George’s Medical School; Wendy Earle, Birkbeck Impact Officer)

3.45pm-4pm:  Coffee

4-5.15pm:  Breakout group sessions to discuss intersections of the sessions with individual research projects

5.30pm:  Happy 70th Birthday NHS, Drinks Reception, followed by evening tour of the Wellcome Collection

 

Day 2, November 8th 2018

10.15-10.30am:  Coffee and Registration

10.30-11.15am:  Keynote Lecture 2: From academy to clinic, and back again (tbc)

11.15am-12.30pm:  Medical Humanities and Ethics (tbc)

12.30-1.30pm:  Lunch

13.30-2.30pm:  Open Space to discuss the morning sessions

2.30-3.45pm:  Putting theory into practice: medical humanities as practice-based research (tbc)

3.45pm-4pm:  Coffee

4-5.15pm:  Breakout group sessions to discuss intersections of the sessions with individual research projects

5.30pm:  Panel discussion and Drinks Reception, hosted by Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities

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CFP: Symposium of Sound, Durham University – Deadline 14 June 2018

Call for Papers

‘The rest is silence’

Symposium of Sound

Durham University

3rd-4th September 2018

Keynote speakers and performers:

Professor Helen Abbott, Department of Modern Languages, University of Birmingham

Dr Edward Allen, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Aurélia Lassaque, bilingual poet and singer in French and Occitan

The Symposium of Sound is a two-day conference supported by Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership. We invite abstracts for papers of twenty minutes in length on the theme of ‘sound’: its creation, imitation, and its relationship with language. Proposals may range across fields of study, with interdisciplinary approaches particularly welcome in areas such as literature, music, performance and creative practice, modern languages, and linguistics. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Utterance, verbal and non-verbal
  • Metre, rhythm, and rhyme
  • Timbre and voicing
  • Pitch and tone
  • Echo and imitation
  • Song and lyric in performance and on the page
  • Phonetics and phonology
  • Soundscapes and sounds in place
  • Orality and aurality
  • Dialect and vernacularity
  • Gossip, rumour and bruit
  • Noise
  • Sound media (including radio and film)
  • Repetition
  • Silence and the absence of sound

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a short biography to symposiumofsound2018@gmail.com by 14th June 2018.

You can find further information on our conference website.

Keep up to date with the latest conference news by following us on Twitter on @sound_symposium and liking us on Facebook.

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Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018/19 – deadline 18 June 2018

Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19

Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) is currently planning its programme of events for 2018-19.

We welcome proposals from researchers and students working in any discipline or field across the Schools of Arts, Law, SSHP, and Science.

We are very happy to work in collaboration with research centres and institutes at Birkbeck or at other institutions.

All our events take place in the Birkbeck Cinema, typically on Friday evenings 6-9pm and Saturdays 10-5pm.

We can show films in 16mm and 35mm, as well as a variety of digital formats.

We are especially keen to foreground film and other moving image material that is rarely screened in public.

If you would like to propose an idea for an event, please use the following form:

BIMI Call for proposals 2018-19 and send it to bimi@bbk.ac.uk – the deadline for submission is the 18th of June.

Looking forward to hearing about your ideas.

Michael Temple, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Essay Film Festival

Matthew Barrington, interim BIMI Manager

Sign up to our newsletter: bimi@bbk.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Birkbeck_BIMI

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Birkbeck-Institute-for-the-Moving-Image-542278625939273/

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Corkscrew Show and Tell (30 May) and Awkward Encounters (21 June) – Practice Based Research

Please find below details of two Corkscrew events coming up:

1) Show and Tell: Birkbeck practice-research PhD students present and discuss their work in progress

Wednesday 30 May 2018, 2-5pm
Room 106, 43 Gordon Square

Gol Nourp: Representations of Iranian female sexuality in Iranian contemporary literature

Selina Robertson: Building the archive: a curatorial investigation into the hidden histories of London’s feminist film collectives of the 1980s. 

Open to all PhD students. No need to book.

2) Awkward Encounters: Consent in Practice-Research

Thursday 21 June, 6-9pm (refreshments will be served)
Birkbeck, University of London, Keynes Library
Facilitated by Sarah Jury and Hamish MacPherson

A peer-to-peer workshop for exchanging tactics, methods and concerns about negotiating consent in practice-research. This workshop is for students, postgraduates and academics who work with other people in the process of their research, and consider this part of their practice-research.

Place are limited, details and booking here.

Sophie Hope

Lecturer, Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies

School of Arts, Birkbeck College, University of London

s.hope@bbk.ac.uk

www.sophiehope.org.uk

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‘Trust Me’ Symposium, UCL Institute of Advanced Studies & Wellcome, Friday 25 May

‘Trust Me’: The Language of Medical Expertise and Imposture in Britain, 1400-1900

A Symposium at the UCL Institute of Advanced Studies and the Wellcome Collection

25 May, 9:30 AM – 6 PM

 

‘Trust Me’ is an interdisciplinary symposium on the long history of medical confidence and publicity. How did medical practitioners craft a language to cultivate confidence in their knowledge and abilities? We hope to trace how assurances (and overassurances) of expertise—as expressed in mountebanks’ medicine shows, print medical advertising, bedside manner, and training literature—adapted to new knowledge paradigms, media technologies, and regulatory regimes to win that trust of prospective patients and skeptical authorities. How did this language of medical publicity circulate? How was this language translated into social life and the popular imagination?

 

  1. A. Katritzky(Barbara Wilkes Research Fellow in Theatre Studies, Open University) will deliver the plenary lecture, ‘Performing medical harangues in early modern Britain and beyond’.

 

Participants will include:

  • Elma Brenner (Wellcome Collection)
  • Joe Stadolnik (UCL)
  • Sarah Mayo (University of Georgia/UCL)
  • Genice Ngg (Singapore University of Social Sciences)
  • Alannah Tomkins (Keele University)
  • Jeni Buckley (Warden Park Academy)
  • Emily Senior (Birkbeck)
  • Cara Dobbing (Leicester)

This symposium was organized as part of the ‘Lies’ research thread at the IAS by Joe Stadolnik, in partnership with Dr Elma Brenner and the Wellcome Collection. This conference is generously supported by the IAS and a conference grant from the Society for the Social History of Medicine.

 

All welcome. Please find the programme here and register here.

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Psychoanalysis and Visual Culture in Historical Perspective Reading Group – 30 May 2018

Reading Group: Psychoanalysis and Visual Culture in Historical Perspective

30 May, 6.30pm

Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square

This open reading group will look at key texts in the history of psychoanalysis, exploring their potential connections to visual culture.

Readings are intended for anyone who’s interested in delving into this literature with a like minded group of non-experts from disciplines across art history, visual culture, film and media studies etc.

For the first session on Wednesday 30 May6.30pm in the Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square, we’ve picked three texts from the mid-twentieth century related to British Object Relations:

Ronald Fairbairn, ‘The War Neuroses – their Nature and Signifcance’ (1943)

Donald Winnicott, ‘Playing: Its Theoretical Status in the Clinical Situation’ (1968)

and… not directly associated with object relations but a key point of reference…

Melanie Klein, ‘On the Sense of Loneliness’ (1963) 

Readings in links above, or available to download via google drive here:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1I5SBj_5Zb_V-wEbH4dddpd00zzsK5ynT?usp=sharing

If you’re only able to read one or two of the texts, please do still come along. We’re also inviting people to bring 2-3 images that they’re working on – to help spark our visual thinking and draw out any potential connections, applications, tangents etc.

Assuming there’s an appetite to continue the readings, we’ll pick the texts and date for the next session following on from this first one. Please bring suggestions for readings if you have them!

To RSVP and for more information, please contact:

Alistair Cartwright (Birkbeck, History of Art) — alistaircartwright@gmail.com

Christy Slobogin (Birkbeck, History of Art) — cslobo01@mail.bbk.ac.uk

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Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities Reading Group – Summer Term 2018

Please find below details of upcoming events linked to the Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities.

Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group – Summer Term 2018

Tuesday 29th May, 2-3.30 pm, Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PD

Extracts from Jasbir Puar, The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability. Duke UP, 2017. We will read the Preface, Introduction, and (optionally) Chapter 2: Crip Nationalism: From Narrative Prosthesis to Disaster Capitalism

Tuesday 26th June, 4-5.30 pm, Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PD

Extracts from Eli Clare, Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling With Cure. Duke UP, 2017. We will read Chapter 1: Ideology of Cure, Chapter 2: Violence of Cure, and (optionally) Chapter 3: In Tandem With Cure.

Email Sophie Jones (sophie.jones@bbk.ac.uk) for access to the reading (include your Dropbox-linked email address if you have one).

 

 

Please note that the Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities website is currently under maintenance and will be updated with details of the above events as soon as possible.

Please visit the site for more information about our activities, and do forward this on to any interested parties.

 

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CFP Action: Arrest – Performance, protest, and the law deadline 11 June 2018

Action: Arrest 

Performance, protest, and the law

A one-day symposium

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Doyle (University of California, Riverside)

Join us in exploring the role of action and arrest in protest, law, and performance. Taking place during the year of the Suffragette centenary, the fifty-year anniversary of the Paris ‘68 uprisings, and a period of burgeoning civil unrest and political uncertainty in the UK and worldwide, Action: Arrest looks to assess and reassess the relationship between performance, protest, and the law. Inspired by their compelling dualities, the symposium aims to open up a new set of questions that may further complicate the relationship between these terms.

Recent and ongoing people-led political movements – for example, the March for Our Lives against current US gun laws, Yarl’s Wood #HungerForFreedom hunger strikes and #Stansted15 activists fighting against inhumane detention in the UK, and global campaigns to fight gendered and sexual violence with #MeToo and #TimesUp – contribute to the sense that we are in a moment of global action, where national and international uprisings are opening up new alternatives for social and political futures. At the same time, disparities in media representation, state reactions, and police response to different forms of activism expose tensions between the hope for positive change and forward momentum and the recreation and reinforcement of existing oppressions and dynamics of power. This conference asks where performance intervenes in these tensions, examining the value of reading protest as performance, particularly as it intersects with the law and disciplinary structures of power. Grounding itself in the current political moment, we hope the conference will provide an opportunity to engage with current and historical protest in its varying forms and varying spaces – the street, the theatre, the courtroom, and the gallery, amongst others – to analyse the relationship between performance, protest, and the law.

Interdisciplinary in its aims, Action: Arrest draws together academics, artists and practitioners from varying disciplines and their intersections. Honouring the constitutive links between methodologies, content, and form, Action: Arrest resists the cloistering control of academic tradition and discipline and encourages diversity, collaboration, and dissent. We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers, 10-minute provocations, and collaborative and performative papers. We are also very open to suggestions for alternative formats or styles of presentation not listed here.

Proposals for contributions that bear directly on one or more of the above themes are welcome. These might address:

  • Explorations of action and arrest as bodily and affective, and considerations of how they define different bodies.
  • Racialised, gendered and sexualised bodies in performance, protest and arrest.
  • Thinking through the relationship between movement, action, arrest, and stillness, and their relationship to political uprisings and the law.
  • How does action catalyse change, and how is action used as a means of control?
  • Affect as protest, the body protesting itself through exhaustion, fatigue, boredom, irritation, sweat, and excitement.
  • (Non)/Spectacular violence and protest.
  • Protest in and outside the museum, gallery and/or institutional setting (e.g. WHEREISANAMENDIETA, Liberate Tate etc).
  • Protest as the duality and contradictions of arrest as a control of bodies, and as a protection of bodies.
  • Explorations of restorative and transformative justice, penal reform, and abolitionism.
  • The influence of legal structures and policies on recent or historical actions and protests, with particular focus on how this has been used as a regulatory and disciplinary tool.
  • Protest, legal action, and minoritarian feminisms.
  • Resistance to repressive politics through action, arrest, stillness and movement.
  • Considerations of police behaviour, civil unrest, and dissonance. Moments of action and stillness between dissenters and those attempting to exert state control. (e.g. riot police and protesters, state or police interventions in performance works).
  • The relationship between arrest as being taken into legal custody, and arrest as inaction or stillness.
  • The capitulation of radicalism under neoliberal/late capitalist regimes.
  • Languages of visual activism.

Please send 250 word abstracts and 100 word bios and/or artist statements to actionarrest@gmail.com by the 11th of June 2018.

Bryony White and Savannah Whaley

King’s College London

www.actionarrest.wordpress.com

Kindly supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership

 

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CFP: DISTRACTION Birkbeck Institute for Social Research Graduate Conference – deadline 7 May 2018

The Call for Papers for the BISR annual graduate conference has been extended! The theme this year is DISTRACTION.

This conference aims to involve PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines and institutions. It is funded by the Birkbeck Institutes of Social ResearchGender and Sexuality, and Humanities

Dates: 8-9 June 2018

NEW DEADLINE: 7th May 2018. Please send 200 word abstracts and 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk. If you are also interested in taking part in the running of the event such as chairing a panel, please get in touch via this email.

We are delighted to confirm Prof. Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford) and Dr. Sophie Jones (Birkbeck, English) as our keynote speakers.

 

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/fellows-and-academic-staff/d/carolin-duttlinger

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/sophie-jones

 

Full details: http://bit.ly/2hCcxuq

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