CPRC: Border Blurs – Concrete Poetry in England and Scotland. 5 December 6-9pm

The Birkbeck Contemporary Poetics Research Centre (CPRC) invites you to the launch of Border Blurs: Concrete Poetry in England and Scotland (Liverpool University Press). We are celebrating the launch of Greg Thomas’ fantastic book with an evening of papers and discussion on the practice of Concrete Poetry in both its British and international contexts.

Date: 5 December 2019

Location: Room B13, 43 Gordon Square, School of Arts, Birkbeck University

Time: 6-9pm

You can get a free ticket on Eventbrite here.  

More About the Launch 

6 pm – Welcome and Reception

6:15 – Introductions Steve Willey, Lecturer in Creative and Critical Writing, Birkbeck and Director of the CPRC

6:20 – Greg Thomas, ‘Ian Hamilton Finlay, Albert Speer and the Ideology of the (Concrete) Aesthetic’

6:35 – ‘Exploring Border Blurs’ a Q&A with Bronac Ferran and Greg Thomas

6:50 – Bronac Ferran, ‘Letters to Mayer’

7:05 –  Nicola Simpson, ‘dsh and yantramantra: typestract as poemscore and prayer’

7:20 – Interval

7:35 – Matt Martin, ‘Ports in a Storm: Bill Griffiths’ Forming Four Dock Poems’

7:50 – Rebecca Kosic, ‘Transatlantic Connections: Concrete poetry in the American Hemisphere’

8:05 pm – General Q&A Chaired by Steve Willey

8:30-9 pm – End

About the participants 

Dr Greg Thomas Greg is an independent scholar and recent British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow based in London.

Dr Rebecca Kosick is Lecturer in the School of Modern Languages at the University of Bristol and Co-Director of the Bristol Poetry Institute. She is the author of two books forthcoming in 2020: Material Poetics in Hemispheric America: Words and Objects, 1950-2010 (Edinburgh University Press) and a poetry collection, Labor Day (Golias Books).

Matt Martin is Stuart Hall Research Scholar at Birkbeck, researching the use of nation language and dialect in avant-garde poetry. His own poetry collections include full spectrum apotheosis (Contraband Books) and the dotted line (Gang Press). He maintains the event listings page Innovative Poetry Readings in London (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cprc/readings).

Bronac Ferran is a PhD candidate in English and the Humanities at Birkbeck working on Hansjörg’s Mayer’s ‘typoems’ of the nineteen sixties. She is the author of ‘The Smell of Ink and Soil: The Story of Edition Hansjörg Mayer’ (2017) and the recently appointed Manager of the Institute for the Humanities at Birkbeck.

Dr Nicola Simpson is a curator and researcher at Norwich University of the Arts. Her interests are in discussing, experiencing and performing the influence of Zen and Tantric Buddhisms on British counter-cultural art and writing. She is editor of The Cosmic Typewriter: The Life and Work of Dom Sylvester Houédard (Occasional Papers, 2012) and co-editor of Dom Sylvester Houédard (Richard Saltoun, Riding House, 2017).

About Border Blurs

This book offers the first in-depth account of the relationship between English and Scottish poets and the international concrete poetry movement of the 1950s to the 1970s. Concrete poetry was a literary and artistic style which reactivated early twentieth-century modernist impulses towards the merging of artistic media, while simultaneously speaking to a gamut of contemporary contexts, from post-1945 reconstruction to cybernetics, mass media and the sixties counter-culture. The terms of its development in England and Scotland suggest new ways of mapping ongoing complexities in the relationship between the two national cultures, and of tracing broader sociological and cultural trends in Britain during the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing especially on the work of Ian Hamilton Finlay, Edwin Morgan, Dom Sylvester Houédard and Bob Cobbing, Border Blurs is based on new and extensive archival and primary research, and will fill a vital gap in contemporary understandings of an important but much misunderstood genre: concrete poetry. It will also serve as a vital document for scholars and students of twentieth-century British literature, modern intermedia art and modernism, especially those interested in understanding modernism’s wide geographical spread and late twentieth-century legacies.

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Arabic Poetry and Stories in Translation – Life Journeys 8 November 2019 6.30pm Keynes Library

Arabic Poetry and Stories in Translation

A Series of Workshops at Birkbeck and SOAS presented by Marina Warner (Birkbeck) and Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS)

8 November 2019

Haifa Zangana and Wen-chin Ouyang

Public event:

Life Journeys

6:30-7:30 pm

Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square

Tickets: https://bit.ly/36r2Aq8

 

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Booker at Birkbeck: Creative Writing Competition – deadline 25 October 2019

As part of events relating to this year’s Booker Prize at Birkbeck, a Creative Writing competition has been opened to Birkbeck students from any School and Department, on the theme of ‘Adaptation’. Prizes will be awarded by celebrated novelist Ian McEwan.

McEwan is giving this year’s Booker Prize lecture on the 7 November; with Christopher Hampton, he will be discussing his novel Atonement and its film adaptation by Hampton.

Tickets for the event are available here: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=7388.

Students are invited to submit up to 3,000 words of creative writing prose (fiction or non-fiction), by 5pm on October 25, at this link: http://mironline.org/bookerprizecompetition/. The theme of ‘adaptation’ can be interpreted according to its many resonances, whether literary, biological, psychological, or social (amongst others).

The winner, and two runners-up, will be presented with a prize of book tokens by Ian McEwan, and will have their writing published on the Mechanics’ Institute Review online.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

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CfP – CHASE PG Journal Brief Encounters (deadline: 17 June)

The editors of Brief Encounters are pleased to open a call for papers for the journal’s fourth issue and warmly invite research students and staff to submit a short article, review or creative piece of work for publication. Submissions deadline: Monday, 17th June 2019.

Brief Encounters is an open access, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, postgraduate journal organised by CHASE. All postgraduate research students, regardless of their funding status, are welcome to submit to the journal as are staff.

For students in particular, publishing in the journal offers the opportunity to experience the peer-review process, to give their research exposure, and to build their publication record.

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Call for Papers – Brief Encounters – Issue 4

URL: http://briefencounters-journal.co.uk/BE/pages/view/call-for-submissions

Brief Encounters is now open to submissions from research students and staff at CHASE-affiliated institutions (see below for the list). We welcome submissions in the form of academically rigorous and original articles (500–4,000 words), reviews (500–1,000 words) and creative works.

The deadline for submissions is Monday, 17th June 2019.

Brief Encounters welcomes submissions from any field. The journal’s aim is to improve the exchange of ideas between geographical or disciplinary boundaries. The journal provides a space where researchers can publish short articles and share findings which might not be long enough for publication in another journal. We also aim to help students in creative disciplines share their work and engage with other researchers (see below for more information about this).

There is no theme and all submissions will be considered on their own merits. In the past, articles have reflected the academic diversity of our author-base, with work touching on concepts like belonging, embodiment, sustainability, change, identity, space, deviation and division.

Submitting to the journal provides a valuable opportunity for authors to experience the peer-review process in a constructive environment – something especially valuable for postgraduate students and early-career academics.

What is Brief Encounters?

Brief Encounters is an open access peer-reviewed postgraduate journal, run by doctoral researchers from the CHASE doctoral training partnership to showcase the work of research students, staff and alumni of CHASE-affiliated institutions (see here for the list).

About reviews

Reviews can cover new publications, films, theatre productions, documentaries, and major exhibitions engaging with any aspect of the arts and humanities. Reflecting the ethos of CHASE, we are particularly interested in emerging scholarship and innovative interdisciplinary publications and productions.

About creative works

The editorial board is especially keen to receive submissions for its creative section; potential submissions could include (but are not limited to): video essays, creative writing, documentaries, posters, musical interpretations, and photography. These must be accompanied by a critical commentary of no fewer than 500 words.

Who can submit?

  • CHASE-funded students (see a list of institutions)
  • Postgraduate students at CHASE institutions (regardless of funding status)
  • Alumni of CHASE institutions
  • Individuals employed by CHASE institutions
  • Individuals employed by Non-HEI CHASE partners

Submission guidelines

Submission should be made by the deadline, Monday, 17th June 2019, through the Brief Encounters on-line submission process (see our step-by-step guide).

All submissions will follow MHRA style guidelines (footnotes and bibliography). Please see our style guide for further details.

Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting or, if already registered, can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Along with your article, please submit an abstract (max. 300 words), and a list of key words (max. 5). When you register as an author on the website, please provide a brief bio statement (max. 200 words).

If you have any queries please contact journal@chase.ac.uk

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Chase Creative Writing BAME Masterclass – Deadline 18 March 2018

Applications are invited to attend a Chase funded residency for creative writers in May. One week at a beautiful modernist barn conversion in Norfolk for creative writing PhD students. It will include a masterclass by the extraordinary Sarah Hall, as well as student led workshops and classes. There will also be plenty of time for students to work on their own writing and also to get to know one another, swim in the pool, enjoy the gardens etc. It’s open to all creative writing or creative/critical writing PhD candidates (whether or not funded).

http://www.chase.ac.uk/creative-writing-residency

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Birkbeck Poetry Workshop – 5 September 2017 7pm

BBK PWS 20170905 SEP

BIRKBECK POETRY WORKSHOP

THIS EVENT IS ORGANISED BY ALUMNI. MOST WELCOMED IS ANY POET, (INCLUDING CURRENT STUDENTS,) TO PRESENT A POEM FOR DISCUSSION.  

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Tuesday 5th September   7 pm till 9 pm Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square.

Chair: Richenda Power

Themes:

1) Lake

2) Stone

3) Skirt

Forms:

a) Free

b)Sonnet

c) Ballad

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Please feel free to bring along 12 photocopies of a poem to share, have constructively criticized or praised.

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Practice Based – Corkscrew Spring Term 2017

CORKSCREW: SPRING 2017

Show and Tell

Hosted by Bruno Roubicek, artist and Birkbeck PhD student, show and tell sessions invite practice-based research students to present work in progress. It’s an opportunity to share your emerging practice and receive feedback in a supportive environment. Sessions through the year will consider how practice and scholarship can work together to generate insight and understanding. What is “doing knowledge” and how can practice be made evident to examiners?

On Monday 27 February, 2-5pm, join us for the spring Show and Tell session. Alongside presentations, we will discuss Sophie Hope’s article ‘Bursting paradigms: a colour wheel of practice-research’, Cultural Trends, 25, 2 (2016), 74-86 (NB. Senate House Library membership needed for access via this link).

Show and Tell takes place in G10, School of Arts. The summer date will be announced later in the year.

RSVP to Bruno here.

The Particularities of Conference Presentation

On Friday 3 March, 9.30am-12.30pm, join us for a 3-hour workshop that offers training in delivering conference presentations effectively.

Conference presentation is an essential aspect of the working life of a professional researcher.  Yet doctoral students often acquire skills in this area somewhat unevenly, learning through trial and error.  This workshop approaches the conference presentation as a moment of public performance.  It asks: what are the formal features of an effective presentation?  What techniques can a presenter use to communicate with his or her audience – whether in the context of scholarly conferences, public lectures, or arts venues?  This workshop is run in collaboration with artists from Haranczak-Navarre Performance Projects.

Participating students can then either attend or present research on collaborative practices at Twofold: the Particularities of Working in Pairs (Friday 3 & Saturday 4 March 2017) – a symposium that explores the duet as a mode of collaboration across the disciplines.  See the foot of this email for the CFP – deadline Friday 27 January.

The Particularities of Conference Presentation is supported by the CHASE Cohort Development Fund.  Places are free but limited to 20 – booking is essential.

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Call for Papers: Thinking through Fiction, deadline 4 March 2016

Thinking through Fiction

A conference at the University of Kent
Centre for Creative Writing
21st-22nd June 2016
Grimond Building

This 2-day conference will explore the complex relationship between fiction, writing, and thought.

How do we use fiction to explore ideas? What do we create when we create writing? In what ways can fiction offer a means of examining, questioning, understanding the world? What are the relations between text, representation, form, language and thought? Where is the boundary between creative and critical writing—and how might we test the unstable, shifting, flexible nature of that boundary? How might we consider other art forms in these terms?

Creative Writing is now widely taught at universities across the UK and beyond, and the parameters of what constitutes a valid route of academic inquiry—the furtherance of knowledge—are adjusting accordingly.

Call for Papers
For interested participants:
We welcome perspectives from creative writers both within and beyond the academy, and from other fields such as linguistics, philosophy, arts, film, and social sciences. Contributions are welcome from all: academic staff, postgraduate students, and other practitioners.

Panels might include (an indicative, not an exhaustive list):

  • The ‘novel of ideas’ past and present
  • (How) can we render thought in prose and other creative mediums?
  • Streams of consciousness
  • Philosophy and the novel
  • Writers writing about writing
  • Creative-critical boundaries
  • Experimental fiction(s)
  • Genre fiction and allegory
  • Politics and polemics

Please send a short abstract of 200-300 words for a 20-minute paper or presentation to a.sackville@kent.ac.uk by 4th March 2016.

We are open to creative approaches to presenting, from the formal academic paper to the performative reading.

This event is mounted by the Centre for Creative Writing at the School of English, University of Kent.
The convenor is Amy Sackville (a.sackville@kent.ac.uk)

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