JAWS Introduction to Publishing in Journals – Wed 7 March 2018

07 Mar 2018

6pm to 8pm

As part of the Research Fortnight, this event is being held for students of all levels who are interested in publishing their work in Journals, and finding out about what being a Journal Editor entails.

Robert Gadie and Ruth Solomons, Editors for the Journal of Arts Writing by Students (JAWS), published by Intellect, will speak about how the peer review and editing process works, and how they accommodate submissions of practice i.e. practice-based articles. JAWS is dedicated to publishing the work of MA and PhD students across the arts, and has a dedicated community of student peer reviewers, which they are always looking to expand.

The event will conclude with a panel discussion and Q&A of Editors from UAL: Dr Ana Bilbao Yarto, Editor for Afterall Journal; Professor Susan Orr, Editor for Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education Journal; Catherine Smith, Editor for Spark; UAL Creative Teaching and Learning Journal; Chris Smith, Associate Editor for the Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and Ruth Solomons, Journal of Arts Writing by Students.

For more information and bookings, please click on the following link: http://events.arts.ac.uk/event/2018/3/7/Introduction-to-Publishing-in-Journals/ 

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Chase Creative Writing BAME Masterclass – Deadline 18 March 2018

Applications are invited to attend a Chase funded residency for creative writers in May. One week at a beautiful modernist barn conversion in Norfolk for creative writing PhD students. It will include a masterclass by the extraordinary Sarah Hall, as well as student led workshops and classes. There will also be plenty of time for students to work on their own writing and also to get to know one another, swim in the pool, enjoy the gardens etc. It’s open to all creative writing or creative/critical writing PhD candidates (whether or not funded).

http://www.chase.ac.uk/creative-writing-residency

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CANCELLED – ASSC: Designed in Parallel or in Translation? 2 March

Please note that Friday’s talk has been cancelled due to adverse weather.

Finola O’Kane Crimmins (UCD Dublin)

Designed in Parallel or in Translation? 

Plantation Landscapes from Ireland, Jamaica and Georgia 1730-1830

2 March, 6pm, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square

 

 

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FREE screening ‘KING OF THE BELGIANS’ at BIMI this Wednesday 21 February 2018

FREE screening ‘KING OF THE BELGIANS’ at BIMI this Wednesday 21 February 2018

On the eve of the ‘Focus on Belgian Cinema’ season at Ciné Lumière (French Institute, 22-25 February), BIMI is hosting an introductory event about Belgian film, including a FREE screening of King of the Belgians (Peter Brosens, Jessica Woodworth, 2016). You can BOOK here: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events-calendar/focus-on-belgian-cinema-king-of-the-belgians

Two speakers, Wouter Hessels, film lecturer and cinema programmer at the Brussels Royal Institute for Theatre, Cinema & Sound, and the film critic and author Louis Danvers, will each give a brief talk about contemporary Belgian cinema, and their presentations will be followed by a screening of King of the Belgians and a discussion chaired by Janet McCabe, director of the MA Film Programming and Curating at Birkbeck.

King of the Belgians is a road movie in which King Nicolas III (Peter Van den Begin), faced with a domestic crisis while on a state visit in the Balkans, embarks on a trip that awakens him to the real world. The movie has been selected for numerous film festivals and was described by Variety as “an enormously appealing mockumentary blending gently satirical humour with deeper underpinnings […] a delightful, surprisingly respectful ribbing of the incongruity of monarchy, Belgium and the Balkans”. Filmmaking duo Peter Brosens and Jessica Woodworth both come from a documentary background, and King of the Belgians marks a change in direction for them, as they explain in this interview about the film: http://cineuropa.org/ff.aspx?t=ffocusinterview&l=en&tid=3049&did=319853

This special event is organised with the support of Wallonie-Bruxelles International and Flanders House. For more information about the ‘Focus on Belgian Cinema’ season at the French Institute: https://www.institut-francais.org.uk/cine-lumiere/whats-on/festivals-series/focus-on-belgian-cinema/

Louis Danvers is a film critic living in Brussels, where he was born in 1955. He writes for Le Vif-L’Express, while also reviewing films for Telepro and for radio programs on RTBF. Co-founder of the film monthly Visions in the early 1980s, he is a long-time collaborator of the Royal Belgian Film Archive, and has written several film books, including Nagisa Oshima (Les Cahiers du Cinéma) and Brazil de Terry Gilliam (Yellow Now). He has directed documentaries about filmmakers, including Jaco Van Dormael and Abderrahmane Sissako. Under his real name, Michel Sordinia, he is the singer and songwriter of post punk cult band The Names, signed by Manchester’s Factory Records in 1979 and still active today.

Wouter Hessels teaches film history, Belgian cinema and media studies at RITCS, Royal Institute for Theatre, Cinema & Sound in Brussels. He also teaches at Vesalius College (Free University of Brussels) and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. Since 2009, he has been the film programmer at the art house CINEMA RITCS in Brussels, and he also worked for the Royal Belgian Film Archive, and as a film expert for Flemish national television. He publishes regularly on art, media, film, education and politics, and he creates poetry-music projects, such as Brussels North–Brussel Centraal–Bruxelles Midi (2015-2016). He writes, teaches and performs poetry in Dutch, French, English, Spanish and Italian.

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Murray Seminar: Emmanuele Lugli – Tuesday 13 February 5pm

Dear Student,

I’m writing with details of next week’s Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck. These advanced research seminars are open to all, and attract interested members of the public, staff and students from other London colleges and beyond.  They are an opportunity to hear and contribute to cutting-edge research, often at the very early stages of work in progress.  The timing allows you to attend and still go to classes on the same evening.  All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

Emmanuele Lugli  Tuesday 13 February

Chasing Absence: The Body of Christ and the Measures to Enter in Touch with it

This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the ‘mensura Christi,’ or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its marginalization in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the ‘mensura Christi’ relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationships of measuring practices, visual belief, and religious orders, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.

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CFP Glasgow International Fantasy Conversations – Submissions Deadline 31 January 2018

Glasgow International Fantasy Conversations 

Escaping Escapism in Fantasy and the Fantastic

26th – 27th April 2018

What is the role of fantasy and the fantastic? Why—and perhaps more crucially, how—does the genre matter? Fantasy theorists frequently define the genre in opposition to what is possible and real: Kathryn Hume, for instance, sums it up in Fantasy and Mimesis as “departures from consensus reality”. Critics often scrutinize this departure as a negative, and disparage representations of the fantastic either due to their failure to depict real world issues or their presumed attempts at “escapism.” This perceived link between fantasy and escapism is so strong that dictionaries like the Oxford English Dictionary define escapism as “engaging in fantasy”.

Despite this association, a growing body of evidence asserts both that escapism can be healthy and that the fantastic can influence how its consumers perceive real world issues even when their representations are deemed problematic. For example, though readers and scholars have criticized the portrayal of minority groups in J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, studies suggest that people who read the series are more accepting of stigmatised groups and more likely to vote for political candidates whose policies support these groups. And while some critics view the creation of fictional Secondary Worlds as a troubling detachment from reality, creativity scholars have drawn links between creating imaginary worlds as a child and high achievement in artistic and scientific fields later in life. Escapism is perhaps not as escapist as it was previously perceived to be, and even when it is, it can have a positive impact. The “escapism accusation” is being flipped on its head, with texts as disparate as Diana Wynne Jones’s Fire and Hemlock and Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s “Normal Again” presenting the rejection of the fantastic in favour of “reality” as the dangerous escapist behaviour. The traditional dynamic between escapism and the fantastic is constantly being changed and renegotiated.

This two-day symposium seeks to examine and honour the relationship between escapism and the fantastic. We welcome proposals for papers on this theme from researchers and practitioners working in the field of fantasy and the fantastic across all media, whether within the academy or beyond it. We are particularly interested in submissions from postgraduate and early career researchers.

We will offer workshops in creative writing for those interested in exploring the creative process.

We ask for 300-word abstracts for 20-minute papers, as well as creative presentations that go beyond the traditional academic paper.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

– Intersections and interplays between fantasy and reality.

– Metatextual responses to escapism in fantastic texts and media.

– Theoretical and/or critical discussions of escapism in relation to fantasy and the fantastic, broadly defined.

– Relationships between Secondary Worlds and the Primary World; relationships between world and characters.

– Reading, writing, and engaging with fantasy as a political act; the depiction of real world issues, or lack thereof, in fantastical settings and contexts.

– Representations of the fantastic in media associated with escapism, such as live-action role-playing, board games, tabletop role-playing games, television, etc.

Please submit a 300-word abstract and a 100-word biography in separate editable documents (not PDF) to submissions.gifconference@gmail.com by Wednesday, the 31st of January 2018.

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Latin American Archives and Collections in the British Library, Senate House Library and the Northwest: Initial Expression of Interest – March 14th 2018

PiLAS, the British Library and the University of London Senate House Library are pleased to announce a free interactive workshop on the Latin American archives and collections. In addition, we can also cover key Latin American research resources in the northwest of England.

The workshop will be held in Manchester on March 14th 2018 from 14.00 to 17.00 at the People’s History Museum (Left Bank, Spinningfields, Manchester M3 3ER; www.phm.org.uk) and will provide the opportunity for postgraduate researchers to discuss with archivists and curators how to get the most out of archives. There will be an opportunity to visit the museum and its archive in the morning..

Registration for the event will be through Eventbrite, and will open at the end of January. Meanwhile, in order to tailor the workshop to attendees’ needs, we now invite you to express your interest in joining us and to let us know the aspects you would most like us to cover using the Google form: https://goo.gl/forms/Gw8Dpa6zag8ffqvZ2 by 6pm on February 9th 2018 at the latest.

In order to encourage postgraduate researchers from across the UK to join us, a small number of bursaries will be available to help contribute towards travel costs. Priority will be given to those who cannot claim travel bursaries from other sources. You will be able to apply for a travel bursary when registering to attend.

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The British Library (https://www.bl.uk/collection-guides/latin-american-collections)

The Latin American collection at the British Library is the largest in the UK and spans the 16th century to the present day, and covers Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. Researchers will find sources on European conquest and colonialism, the Catholic Church in the Americas, slavery and abolition, independence movements, and contemporary economy, politics and society, and government official publications and statistics from Latin America, and recent academic publications in the humanities from the region. Highlights include:

  • significant resources on contemporary economy, politics and society of interest to social scientists;
  • e-resource collections that include official statistical databases, Hispanic American Periodical Index, Handbook of Latin American Studies and Latin American digitised newspapers 1805-1922;
  • manuscripts on European Conquest, colonialism, indigenous languages, slavery and independence struggles;
  • the early printing of Latin America: religious materials, natural history and 19th- and 20th-century literature, travelogues and political writings;
  • the maps includes some of the earliest representations, maps of colonial expansion, border conflicts, trade routes, and maps and statistical texts related to Latin America from the 18th and early 19th century;
  • photographs and illustrations, predominantly of 19th-century archaeological sites;
  • a sound archive with interviews, music and natural history recordings.

 

The Senate House Library (http://www.senatehouselibrary.ac.uk/our-collections/research-collections/latin-american-studiescontact Laurence Byrne  – Laurence.Byrne@london.ac.uk – for more details)

The Latin American and Caribbean Studies Collection cover most aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean, with an emphasis on material in the humanities and related social sciences: history, politics, economics, anthropology, sociology, gender studies, combined with literature, film and documentaries from or on Latin American and the Caribbean.

Geographically, the collection covers all the territories of Central and South America as well as the islands of the Caribbean (including the English-, Dutch- and French-speaking communities), the islands of the South Atlantic (the Falklands/Malvinas and South Georgia), the Galapagos Islands and the Antarctic territories administered by Chile and Argentina.

Of particular note is the Political Archives Collection, ninety boxes of pamphlets, posters, reports, miscellaneous journals and some ephemera, produced by political parties, pressure groups, NGOs, trade unions and governments, predominantly in Spanish and Portuguese, with some English language material. Every country in the region is represented, but there is a particularly rich collection of Chilean material.

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*****Please let us know using the Google form any other archives you would like to cover, such as the People’s History Museum’s Chile Solidarity Campaign (1973-1991) or the Atlantic slavery archives and collections in Liverpool.*****

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Derek Jarman Lab – Essay Film Course 20 – 23 January 2018

Essay Film Course

An intensive 4-day course in all aspects of audiovisual production related to essayistic and research-led filmmaking. Students work in small groups and learn how to use widely available DSLR cameras and popular editing software to create professional looking and intellectually engaging videos. At the end of the course they complete a short training film. This gives them an opportunity to put their new skills to use immediately and experiment with the form of the essay film in a stimulating environment and with the support of the Lab’s team. Key elements of the course are: introduction to film theory, session on making an impact with research, tips on production management, hands-on skills in lighting set-ups, recording sound, and using cameras (Canon and Panasonic DSLRs, Blackmagic Cinema Camera), a supervised location shoot, editing theory and editing on Final Cut X.

Our courses are designed to cater for a variety of levels of experience and to consider the different ways in which moving images can be used. An integral part of the training is discussing students’ research interests and how to make the best use of film in an academic context. We explore the conventions of documentary filmmaking but also talk about its alternatives, such as the essay film. The focus of this course is on films which combine an artistic form with an argumentative structure. We also engage with the concepts of visual methods of disseminating and conducting research in the humanities and social sciences.

The sessions take place in our offices:

The Derek Jarman Lab
36 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The training begins at 10am on each day of the 4-day course, and we aim to finish around 6pm.

The cost of the course for Birkbeck students and staff is £300.

If you are interested in enrolling, please send an email to bartek@jarmanlab.org

More information about the lab can be found here: jarmanlab.org.

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Murray Seminars: Spring Term 2018

MURRAY SEMINARS – Spring Term 2018

These advanced research seminars are open to all, and attract interested members of the public, staff and students from other London colleges and beyond.  They are an opportunity to hear and contribute to cutting-edge research, often at the very early stages of work in progress.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments. This term’s seminars are:

17 January: Carol Richardson

Britons and Anglo-Saxons in Sixteenth-Century Rome: the 1580s fresco cycle at the English College

William Allen referred to Bede’s Ecclesiastical History as a seminarian’s reader because it proved that Christianity in Britain derived directly from the Catholic church in Rome from its very origins. This was an important argument in the context of Tudor persecution of Catholics because of the Protestant assertion that British Christianity had taken root long before the missions of Augustine of Canterbury introduced the corrupted Roman version of Christianity. This paper will consider the earliest part of the fresco cycle in the English College, which survives as printed images, in light of this deliberate historiographical choice.

13 February: Emanuele Lugli

Chasing Absence: The Body of Christ and the Measures to Enter in Touch with it

This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the ‘mensura Christi,’ or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its marginalization in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the ‘mensura Christi’ relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationships of measuring practices, visual belief, and religious orders, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.

14 March: Luca Palozzi

‘And the great lion walks through his innocent grove’. A cross-disciplinary study of lion paw prints in Giovanni Pisano’s Pisa pulpit

Giovanni Pisano carved animal tracks on the base of one of two lions bearing columns in his pulpit for Pisa Cathedral (1302-1310). Overlooked for more than seven centuries, these are the first naturalistic paw prints carved in marble in post-Classical Western art. This paper presents the initial results of a joint art historical and anatomical study of the Pisa paw prints conducted by Dr Luca Palozzi and Dr Gurå Bergkvist. In so doing, it tackles the much-debated issue of Medieval ‘naturalism’ (and its means) from an unusual perspective. A cross-disciplinary approach, that is, may help us find new answers to long-standing questions.

We hope to see you there.

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