Bill’s Big Birthday Bash: An Evening of Readings in Celebration of Bill Griffiths 20 August 2018

Monday 20th August. Doors 6:30pm, readings from 7pm. In the Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck University of London, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD. Free admission, all welcome with no need to book.

 

Bill Griffiths (1948-2007) was a poet, publisher, translator, archivist, Anglo-Saxonist, prisoners’ rights activist, biker, classical pianist and much more. He was born in Middlesex and was primarily based in the London area before moving to Seaham, County Durham, in 1990. Monday 20th August 2018 would have been his 70th birthday. The Contemporary Poetics Research Centre at Birkbeck and the Poetics Research Centre at Royal Holloway are pleased to announce an evening of readings to mark the occasion and celebrate Griffiths’ achievements. Refreshments provided. This event will feature:

  • Mendoza and Peter Manson reading to launch their new collection WINDSUCKERS & ONSETTERS (SONNOTS for Griffiths). Published by MATERIALS (UK) / MATERIALIEN (Germany), this collaboration is inspired by Griffiths’ research into the lexicons of County Durham’s fishing and mining communities.
  • A collaborative performance by poets Geraldine Monk (who has described Griffiths as her ‘very first poet friend’) and Alan Halsey (editor of Griffiths’ three-volume Collected Poems, published by Reality Street, 2010-2016).
  • A talk by poet and historian John Seed about Griffiths’ life and lexical research in County Durham, plus a reading from Seed’s own poetry about the region.
  • An opportunity for audience members to read excerpts from Griffiths’ work, share their own poems in response to his accomplishments, or speak about their memories of this remarkable writer – if you would like to participate in this segment, please honour a time limit of two minutes, so that everyone has a chance to contribute.
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Birkbeck Nineteenth-Century Reading Group – 2018/19 Sessions

The Birkbeck Nineteenth-Century Reading Group meets in Room 106 on Tuesdays at 6.00. We are a friendly group and always welcome new members.

The dates and texts for 2018-2019 are:

  • October 9th: Anna Karenina (Tolstoy)
  • November 6th: Under Western Eyes (Conrad)
  • December 4th: What Maisie Knew (James)
  • January 8th: A Tale of Two Cities (Dickens)
  • February 5th: Stories by Rabindranath Tagore, texts to be advised.
  • March 5th: The Age of Innocence (Wharton)
  • April 2nd: Poetry of James Henry, texts to be advised.
  • May 7th: Fathers and Sons (Turgenev)
  • June 4th: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Stevenson)
  • July 2nd: Bartleby the Scrivener (Melville)

For further information contact Susie Paskins susiepaskins@googlemail.com

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Anna Konik: A Screening and Artist’s Talk for Refugee Week – Wednesday 27 June 2018, 6-7.30pm

Anna Konik, In the Same City, under the Same Sky…: A Screening and Artist’s Talk for Refugee Week

Wednesday 27 June 2018, 6-7.30pm, followed by a reception
Cinema, School of Arts, Birkbeck

Internationally-recognised video artist Anna Konik is visiting Birkbeck from her bases in Berlin and Warsaw to speak to us about her work involving migrant and refugee stories and to develop a new project with students on Birkbeck’s award-winning Compass Project. Konik has exhibited in numerous Polish and European galleries and museums over the past two decades. In the Winter Semester of 2017-18 she was Rudolf Arnheim Associate Professor at the Department of Art and Visual History, Humboldt University, Berlin; she is currently a fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center.

She will introduce and screen extracts from her project In the Same City, under the Same Sky…, which has been exhibited in Germany, Poland, Sweden and Romania.

In Anna’s words: ‘In the Same City, under the Same Sky… is a response to the reluctance shown towards immigrants and the tragedies that befall them on their way to Europe. These testimonies of immigrant women from Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Burma, Palestine, Turkey, Kurdistan, Congo, Romania, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Somalia, Nigeria, Cameroon, Ecuador, and Roma communities, form an authentic record of their plight. The first part was recorded in the Swedish capital, Stockholm, in 2011; the second in Białystok, near the eastern border of Poland in 2012; the third in Romania, mainly Bucharest, in 2013; the fourth part, recorded in Istanbul, started in parallel with part three and was completed in 2014, and the most recent one was created in Nantes in 2015. In each city where a new episode was filmed, I engage native local residents (Swedish, Polish, Romanian, Turkish and French women, respectively) as mediums. Sitting comfortably in their homes, they retell the immigrant women’s stories, always in the first person, as if they were recounting their own experiences. This important gesture sheds a new light on a seemingly distant problem. Women from ‘here’ identify themselves with the burden of memory and painful experiences of the Others. What is more, they not only lent them their faces and voices, but above all set in motion a mechanism of empathy that suggests a path towards understanding. Perhaps it leads through the crack that appears in the viewer’s perception when the contents of the stories are combined with the images shown on screen.’

Anna Konik’s visit has been made possible by support from the Polish Cultural Institute in London.

Link to event here. All welcome – no booking necessary.

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CFP: Symposium of Sound, Durham University – Deadline 14 June 2018

Call for Papers

‘The rest is silence’

Symposium of Sound

Durham University

3rd-4th September 2018

Keynote speakers and performers:

Professor Helen Abbott, Department of Modern Languages, University of Birmingham

Dr Edward Allen, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Aurélia Lassaque, bilingual poet and singer in French and Occitan

The Symposium of Sound is a two-day conference supported by Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership. We invite abstracts for papers of twenty minutes in length on the theme of ‘sound’: its creation, imitation, and its relationship with language. Proposals may range across fields of study, with interdisciplinary approaches particularly welcome in areas such as literature, music, performance and creative practice, modern languages, and linguistics. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Utterance, verbal and non-verbal
  • Metre, rhythm, and rhyme
  • Timbre and voicing
  • Pitch and tone
  • Echo and imitation
  • Song and lyric in performance and on the page
  • Phonetics and phonology
  • Soundscapes and sounds in place
  • Orality and aurality
  • Dialect and vernacularity
  • Gossip, rumour and bruit
  • Noise
  • Sound media (including radio and film)
  • Repetition
  • Silence and the absence of sound

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a short biography to symposiumofsound2018@gmail.com by 14th June 2018.

You can find further information on our conference website.

Keep up to date with the latest conference news by following us on Twitter on @sound_symposium and liking us on Facebook.

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Corkscrew Show and Tell (30 May) and Awkward Encounters (21 June) – Practice Based Research

Please find below details of two Corkscrew events coming up:

1) Show and Tell: Birkbeck practice-research PhD students present and discuss their work in progress

Wednesday 30 May 2018, 2-5pm
Room 106, 43 Gordon Square

Gol Nourp: Representations of Iranian female sexuality in Iranian contemporary literature

Selina Robertson: Building the archive: a curatorial investigation into the hidden histories of London’s feminist film collectives of the 1980s. 

Open to all PhD students. No need to book.

2) Awkward Encounters: Consent in Practice-Research

Thursday 21 June, 6-9pm (refreshments will be served)
Birkbeck, University of London, Keynes Library
Facilitated by Sarah Jury and Hamish MacPherson

A peer-to-peer workshop for exchanging tactics, methods and concerns about negotiating consent in practice-research. This workshop is for students, postgraduates and academics who work with other people in the process of their research, and consider this part of their practice-research.

Place are limited, details and booking here.

Sophie Hope

Lecturer, Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies

School of Arts, Birkbeck College, University of London

s.hope@bbk.ac.uk

www.sophiehope.org.uk

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Symposium – Liberty, Irreverence and the Place of Women in Early Modern Culture – Friday 11th May 2018

Liberty, Irreverence and the Place of Women in Early Modern Culture

One Day Symposium in Honour of Dr Letizia Panizza

 

Bloomsbury Room, G35, Senate House

Friday 11th May 2018

9.30am – 7pm

For more information please contact: Stefano.Jossa@rhul.ac.uk

Registration free at: https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/15855

This one-day conference considers ideas of liberty, irreverence and womanhood in early modern literature and culture, with 17 speakers from British and European Universities.

Programme

 

9.30 Registration / Coffee
10.00 Giuliana Pieri (RHUL): Introduction
10.15 Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck College): Letizia Panizza’s Contribution to Scholarship
10.45 Coffee
11.15 The Contribution of Women to Early Modern Italian Culture
Chair: Sarah Hutton (University of York)

Abigail Brundin (University of Cambridge): Domestic Devotion in Renaissance Italy

Helena Sanson (University of Cambridge): The Ammaestramenti e ricordi, Difese and Panegirico (1628) by Isabella Sori ‘alessandrina’: A Lost Voice from Seventeenth-Century Italy

Francesca Medioli (Independent scholar): Arcangela Tarabotti and the 1620-1640 Gap Period

Sandra Cavallo (Royal Holloway, London): Gender, Privacy and Space in the Roman Baroque Palace

12.45 Lunch
 

13.45

Poetics and Poetry
Chair: Jane Everson (Royal Holloway, University of London)

Alison Brown (Royal Holloway, London): The Poems of Piero de’ Medici

Amelia Papworth (Cambridge): ‘Do not blame me, but Ariosto’: Laura Terracina’s Discorsi and the Orlando Furioso

Ambra Anelotti (Royal Holloway, London): The Afterlives of Ariosto’s Characters

Poetry – Chair: Jane Everson (Royal Holloway, University of London)

15.15 Tea
15.45 Philosophy – Chair: Martin McLaughlin (University of Oxford)

Unn Irene Aasdalen (Norwegian Humanistic Academy, Norway):  Diotima’s Role in Marsilio Ficino’s De amore

John Sellars (Royal Holloway, London): Philosophical Lives in the Renaissance

Michael J. B. Allen (UCLA): title to be confirmed

17.15 History, Art, Libertinism and Satire – Chair: Dilwyn Knox (University College London)

 

Marta Fattori (Sapienza Università di Roma): ‘1735 Machiavelli all’Indice: Processo contro il marchese Bernardo del Grillo e la sua biblioteca’

Angelo Romano (Università del Salento): Religious Reformed Satire of the Sixteenth Century

Chrysa Damianaki (Università del Salento): Reconsidering the Form and Character of Gian Cristoforo Romano’s Bust of Beatrice d’Este

18.45 Conclusion
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Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19 deadline 18 June 2018

Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19

Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) is currently planning its programme of events for 2018-19.

We welcome proposals from researchers and students working in any discipline or field across the Schools of Arts, Law, SSHP, and Science.

We are very happy to work in collaboration with research centres and institutes at Birkbeck or at other institutions.

All our events take place in the Birkbeck Cinema, typically on Friday evenings 6-9pm and Saturdays 10-5pm.

We can show films in 16mm and 35mm, as well as a variety of digital formats.

We are especially keen to foreground film and other moving image material that is rarely screened in public.

If you would like to propose an idea for an event, please use the attached form and send it to bimi@bbk.ac.uk – the deadline for submission is Friday 18 June.

Looking forward to hearing about your ideas.

Michael Temple, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Essay Film Festival

Matthew Barrington, interim BIMI Manager

Sign up to our newsletter: bimi@bbk.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Birkbeck_BIMI

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Birkbeck-Institute-for-the-Moving-Image-542278625939273/

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Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group – Artisanal Knowledge and Practical Aesthetics in the Eighteenth Century 9 May 2018

Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group

Artisanal Knowledge and Practical Aesthetics in the Eighteenth Century

Postgraduate Workshop and Lecture by Ruth Mack (SUNY, Buffalo)

Wednesday 9 May, 4.30-8pm, Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square

  1. 4.30-6.00: Postgraduate Workshop, organized by Robert Stearn

In her chapter ‘Hogarth’s Practical Aesthetics’, Ruth Mack asks: ‘what does it mean, exactly, to make a theory of beauty artisanally?’

In the first part of this workshop, postgraduate students and early career researchers will give short presentations on objects and problems drawn from their research. Responding to Ruth’s chapter, these will explore how diverse instances of image-making, cataloguing, classifying, reproducing, and theorising engage with artisanal knowledge, and the potentially troubled relation of such knowledge to theory and to the everyday.

In the second, Ruth will respond to these presentations, opening a discussion in which we will use her chapter and the materials presented to shape a conversation about the place of practical knowledge in eighteenth-century natural philosophy, aesthetic theory, artistic practice, and commercial production. What does it mean to call such knowledge maker’s knowledge, or to say that it is corporeal or embodied knowledge? How might such a framework account for desire and pleasure, or for the division of labour? We hope you can join us to think about these questions and more.

Presentations

  • Marianne Brooker (Birkbeck): ‘This Laborious, Expensive, and Arduous Undertaking’: Thomas Martyn’s Universal Conchologist (1784-7) and his ‘Principles of a Private Establishment’
  • Felicity Roberts (King’s College London): Sir Hans Sloane, Classification, Cataloguing, Detail and Delight
  • Rees Arnott-Davies (Independent): Jan van Rymsdyk’s Theory of Image Making
  • Robert Stearn (Birkbeck): George Bickham the younger’s Rococo Knowledge of Everyday Life
  • Miriam Al Jamil (Birkbeck): Dancer, Mistress, Venus, Queen: The Multiple Identities of a Statue

Attendees are encouraged to read Ruth’s chapter, ‘Hogarth’s Practical Aesthetics’, in Mind, Body, Motion, Matter, ed. M. H.McMurran and A.Conway (Toronto, 2016), which is available here: http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=604622.

  1. 6.00-8.00, ‘Equiano and Craft’, Lecture by Ruth Mack

This paper examines the concept of embodied knowledge as it is worked out through Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative. Many of the questions brought to Equiano’s text over the past decade concern issues of authenticity and identity (asked in especially provocative form in Vincent Carretta’s biography of Equiano). I aim to examine the root of these debates over the location of identity in Equiano’s own thought. I will contextualize Equiano’s thinking about society in terms of related Scottish Enlightenment theories he would have known well. But the center of the paper will concern craft or maker’s knowledge and its strange fate in the formation of Equiano’s social theory. Here, I will look at the way craft is both embraced and distanced from the form of subjectivity Equiano wishes to claim, tainted as craft must be by its association with the slave’s merely bodily identity, as the slave trade conceived of it. Working through this tension in his relation to craft ultimately gives Equiano the terms for an ethnography of his African homeland that is both aesthetic and, ultimately, political.

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CFP: Visualising Asia: Deciphering ‘Otherness’ in Visual and Material Cultures – deadline 3 June 2018

Visualising Asia: Deciphering ‘Otherness’ in Visual and Material Cultures

SOAS, University of London

21st September 2018

Confirmed Keynote: Dr Anne Witchard

Historically, Asia has been a contended space of exploration and domination, where both Asian and non-Asian agents sought to define themselves against others. Within this broad historical and geographical context, this international and interdisciplinary conference brings together various forms of visuals, such as films, cartoons, and objects, in their interaction with discourses of ‘other’.  The platforms of visualising Asia were assimilated into daily life and practices, feeding into narratives that transcend any single medium. Due to their visual impact, they became lasting repositories of imagined identities and thus have critical implications for those representing and those being represented. This conference invites discussions on the differing ways ‘otherness’ has been used in both Asian and non-Asian societies through visuals. We encourage the participation from postgraduates, career researchers, scholars, curators, practitioners, and archivists.  The aim is to bring together an array of visualities from across various disciplines in order to reflect on the importance of visuals in knowledge production and circulation within and across cultures and societies.

Wider themes include: empire, multiculturalism, identity, nation, ethnic and cultural minorities, integration, ‘othering’, inclusion, exclusion, power dynamics, representation.

Papers or panels are invited on any topic related to the themes and questions explored in the conference that include but are limited to the following:

  • Representations of Asia by non-Asian cultures across different historical eras.
  • Representations of Asian societies by their neighbouring Asian countries.
  • Representations of minorities within hegemonic discourses in Asia.
  • Gender, ethnicity and class in visual othering of Asia.
  • How and why did representation occur, and the significance and impact for those being represented and those representing.
  • The development of concepts of identity through the use of visual and/or material culture.
  • The politics involved in visual knowledge production.
  • Long-term effects and consequences of visual representations of Asia.
  • The relationship between power and representation. The limits of ‘othering’ and representation.
  • Images of Asia and the development of visual and material industries.
  • Approaches and/or practices in cataloguing images of Asia in archives..

Panels and individual submissions are welcomed.  Please send queries and abstracts of 250-350 words, along with a brief bio of no more than 100 words, to visualisingasia@gmail.com by 3 June 2018.

The conference convenors are Amy Matthewson (SOAS, University of London), and Dr Irene González-López (Kingston University).

 

 

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Murray Seminars at Birkbeck, Summer Term

THE MURRAY SEMINAR ON MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE ART

All seminars are held at 5pm in The Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43, Gordon Sq., London, WC1H OPD. A break at 5.50pm is followed by discussion and refreshments. 

1 May, Cristina Guarnieri, University of Padua

The Stories of St. Lucy by Jacobello del Fiore, and Venetian folding reliquary altarpieces

The Stories of St. Lucy by Jacobello del Fiore are one of the masterpieces of Italian Late Gothic painting, but their function has been little understood. Re-evaluating prevailing theories about the panels’ purpose and display, this paper proposes that they formed a folding reliquary altarpiece, and considers other examples of this type which was once common in the Veneto.

5 June, Michelle O’Malley, the Warburg Institute

Botticelli: A conundrum of production

Two versions of Botticelli’s Virgin and Child with an Adoring Angel suggest raise fundamental questions about the specifics of authorship in the workshop and how we, as art historians, understand Renaissance artistic practice and construct attribution. This paper looks again at the technical evidence and the value of connoisseurship in tracking the development of the use of reproductive technique in late fifteenth-century Florence.

27 June, Alison Wright, UCL

Gold against the Body:  gold surfaces and their limits, medieval to early modern

The myth, famously invoked in Goldfinger, of the human body suffocated by being coated in gold exemplifies the fascination and danger attached to the idea of an ‘excess’ of gold, especially in respect to human skin. This paper explores the slippery boundaries of when, where and for whom gold surfaces might be deemed excessive in relation to European art, especially Italian, of the fourteenth to early sixteenth centuries.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

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