CfP – CHASE PG Journal Brief Encounters (deadline: 17 June)

The editors of Brief Encounters are pleased to open a call for papers for the journal’s fourth issue and warmly invite research students and staff to submit a short article, review or creative piece of work for publication. Submissions deadline: Monday, 17th June 2019.

Brief Encounters is an open access, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, postgraduate journal organised by CHASE. All postgraduate research students, regardless of their funding status, are welcome to submit to the journal as are staff.

For students in particular, publishing in the journal offers the opportunity to experience the peer-review process, to give their research exposure, and to build their publication record.

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Call for Papers – Brief Encounters – Issue 4

URL: http://briefencounters-journal.co.uk/BE/pages/view/call-for-submissions

Brief Encounters is now open to submissions from research students and staff at CHASE-affiliated institutions (see below for the list). We welcome submissions in the form of academically rigorous and original articles (500–4,000 words), reviews (500–1,000 words) and creative works.

The deadline for submissions is Monday, 17th June 2019.

Brief Encounters welcomes submissions from any field. The journal’s aim is to improve the exchange of ideas between geographical or disciplinary boundaries. The journal provides a space where researchers can publish short articles and share findings which might not be long enough for publication in another journal. We also aim to help students in creative disciplines share their work and engage with other researchers (see below for more information about this).

There is no theme and all submissions will be considered on their own merits. In the past, articles have reflected the academic diversity of our author-base, with work touching on concepts like belonging, embodiment, sustainability, change, identity, space, deviation and division.

Submitting to the journal provides a valuable opportunity for authors to experience the peer-review process in a constructive environment – something especially valuable for postgraduate students and early-career academics.

What is Brief Encounters?

Brief Encounters is an open access peer-reviewed postgraduate journal, run by doctoral researchers from the CHASE doctoral training partnership to showcase the work of research students, staff and alumni of CHASE-affiliated institutions (see here for the list).

About reviews

Reviews can cover new publications, films, theatre productions, documentaries, and major exhibitions engaging with any aspect of the arts and humanities. Reflecting the ethos of CHASE, we are particularly interested in emerging scholarship and innovative interdisciplinary publications and productions.

About creative works

The editorial board is especially keen to receive submissions for its creative section; potential submissions could include (but are not limited to): video essays, creative writing, documentaries, posters, musical interpretations, and photography. These must be accompanied by a critical commentary of no fewer than 500 words.

Who can submit?

  • CHASE-funded students (see a list of institutions)
  • Postgraduate students at CHASE institutions (regardless of funding status)
  • Alumni of CHASE institutions
  • Individuals employed by CHASE institutions
  • Individuals employed by Non-HEI CHASE partners

Submission guidelines

Submission should be made by the deadline, Monday, 17th June 2019, through the Brief Encounters on-line submission process (see our step-by-step guide).

All submissions will follow MHRA style guidelines (footnotes and bibliography). Please see our style guide for further details.

Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting or, if already registered, can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Along with your article, please submit an abstract (max. 300 words), and a list of key words (max. 5). When you register as an author on the website, please provide a brief bio statement (max. 200 words).

If you have any queries please contact journal@chase.ac.uk

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CFP: Productive Futures – Deadline 31st May 2019

Call For Paper: Productive Futures

12 – 14 September

The history of science fiction (SF) is a history of unreal economics: from asteroid mining to interstellar trade, from the sex-work of replicants to the domestic labour of the housewives of galactic suburbia, from the abolition of money and property to techno-capitalist tragedies of the near future.

 

LSFRC invites abstracts of 300 words, plus 50 word bios, addressing economic themes in SF, and/or exploring how SF can help to widen and evolve our sense of the economic. We encourage submissions from collaborators across disciplines and/or institutions.

 

For the full length call for papers, and more information, please visit www.lsfrc.co.uk or email lsfrcmail@gmail.com

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CFS: Close Writing – A Salon of Texture – 29 April 2019

Close Writing

Close Writing is a project that wants to explore our textured life through writing. We want to create a space in which contributors from all disciplines and backgrounds can come together to investigate, complicate and question the affects, repercussions and lived experience of texture.

For each salon, we will give a texture accompanied by some prompts, and ask our contributors to respond to it through writing, image, or sound. We will then share our work at a relaxed, critical reading salon, the first will be held in late Spring/early Summer (location and date tbc).

Our first texture is sticky. What does it mean to feel something sticky? Why is a sticky surface so repugnant but simultaneously so alluring? What does it mean for thoughts, ideas, or bodies to stick together? Below are some writing prompts that circle around the subject of sticky that you can use if you wish.

Please send your sticky writing as an attachment to closewritingsalon@gmail.com by the 29th April, labelling the attachment with your name and the title of your work. It can either be a finished piece of around 1300 words or in draft stages. Please also include a bio. Once we have selected we will get back to you to arrange our first reading salon.

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CFP: Journal of Arts Writing – Deadline 22 April 2019

JAWS: Journal of Arts Writing by Students Volume 5 Issue 1

JAWS is the only academic arts journal run by and dedicated to MA and PhD students (and those who have recently graduated). We have published work by students from India, China, Australia, North America, Canada and the UK, and maintain an international peer-review network.

What We Want:
Theoretical and discursive essays up to 6000 words.

Critical reviews of events, exhibitions or performances up to 3000 words.

Submissions of practice accompanied by text. The word count for this type of submission can be negotiated through the peer review and editing process, but we recommend between 3000–5000 words. We strongly recommend authors consult our peer review guidance for unconventional submissions on our website prior to submitting, please see the link below.

All work must be sent in as a Word document to
rob@jawsjournal.com, and be prefaced with a 100-word abstract and 6–8 keywords, followed by a short contributor biography. Please include your university affiliation, full name, course and year of graduation. All work must use Harvard referencing, following Intellect House Style. For full submission guidelines and information about the peer review process we employ, please refer to
www.jawsjournal.com/submissions.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 22 April 2019.

Volume 1 Issue 1 is available for free at:
www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/jaws/

Our guest editorials from previous issues are also available, including those by Professor Arnold Aronson (Columbia University), Dr Sophie Hope (Birkbeck), Dr Inger Mewburn (the Thesis Whisperer), Professor Joseph Heathcott (The New School of Design) and Professor Malcolm Quinn (CCW Graduate School):
https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=243/

For all inquiries please email rob@jawsjournal.com.

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CFP: New Configurations of Contemporary Women’s Writing – 9 September 2019

New Configurations of Contemporary Women’s Writing

Postgraduate Contemporary Women’s Writing  Network 7th Biennial Conference

Monday 9th September 2019, The University of Hull

 

The last two years have seen a renewed vigour amongst women to testify to their experiences and protest their causes.  Shouts of #metoo and #timesup have chimed with quieter revisionings of a female-identifying imaginary.  These voices sound out in contemporary women’s writing just as the literature itself offers a language and a form with which to speak of the shifts – a back and forth between politics and women’s writing that is not new, but speaks of an enduring engagement with the current political mood.

New Configurations asks: How does contemporary women’s writing inhabit and convey the texture of our moment?  How does it envisage the future? And, how does current formal innovation shape the future of women’s writing? Alongside this the conference seeks to consider how we might rethink the scope of our field, regarding questions of inclusivity and critical methodologies.

The 2019 PG CWWN Conference invites proposals from Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers for 15 minute papers, creative or creative-critical contributions. We also welcome proposals for panels or round-tables involving 3-4 people. We explicitly invite papers on texts by female-identifying, femme, transgender and non-binary authors as well as cis-gendered women writers.

Abstracts (250 words) and biographical notes (150 words) should be sent by 7th June 2019 to pgcwwn2019conference@gmail.com

Confirmed Keynote: Joanna Walsh (Seed, break.up, Vertigo, Hotel, Grow a Pair).

Conference Fee: £30 including lunch, dessert and refreshments

Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Gender/Queerness/Reconfiguring binaries/Identity
  • Posthuman/Transhuman
  • Sexuality/Intimacy/Embodiment/Love
  • Maternity/Childlessness/Conjugality/Kinship
  • Utopia/Dystopia/Ecological/Post-Apocalyptic
  • Place/Migration/Nationalism/Cosmopolitanism
  • Disability/Mental Health/Trauma
  • Care/Self-Care
  • Pain/Disease/Gerontology
  • Precarity/Vulnerability/Mortality
  • Conflict/War/Genocide
  • Protest/Feminism/Activism
  • Memoir/Autofiction/Essay/Confessional
  • Experimental Writing/Innovation/Genre
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Submission for Lamplight magazine

Do you write poetry, prose or essays that you feel deserve a platform? Or do you draw, paint or make photography? We would love to hear from you!

 

Lamplight is Birkbeck’s new bimonthly arts & culture magazine, launching in late April. The idea is to provide a platform for students to showcase their writing, visual art, and other creative pursuits. Content is nearly finalised for the first issue and there are just a small number of spaces left for submissions. For prose and essays, we are looking for 600-1200 word pieces. For visual art, we have no specific criteria. It’s unlikely that anything sent after the next two weeks will make it into the first issue (however, don’t let that stop you from submitting for Issue 2!), and the earlier your can get yours in, the better chance you will have of being featured in Lamplight Issue 1. If you have work you would like to share, get in contact with us at lamplightmagazine@gmail.com

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CFP: The third culture? // Literature and Sociology – Deadline 22 April 2019

The third culture? // Literature and Sociology

University of Warwick (Coventry) – 14 June 2019

In 1985 Wolf Lepenies argued that sociology should be considered a ‘third culture’ arising between science and literature. Contemporary discourses and research, however, show us that sociology and literature have a long history of peculiar relatedness.

In 19th century Europe, sociology was considered both a competitor to and counterpart of literary study since consensus held that the two disciplines were best placed to analyse and depict the emerging industrial society. Figures like Balzac, Flaubert, Zola and Simmel hoped to merge literature and social science; while others (like Marx, Durkheim and Weber) drew inspiration from literary work in developing their early sociological masterpieces. Despite this history, the developing pan-European structure of knowledge with its prioritisation of empirical analysis prevented any extensive integration between the two fields (Longo 2015; Jacobsen, Drake et al. 2014; Wallerstein 2007).

 

This conference seeks to renew collaboration between sociology and literature by addressing their disciplinary intersections and coalescences.

 

From this starting point three inter-related dimensions emerge:

 

Firstly, that literature may serve as a heuristic tool for sociological analyses, providing, if not a simplistic ‘reflection’ of social reality, then at least a plausible description or anticipation of human actions and social contexts. In this way some fiction can be understood as social theory (as with Balzac, Dickens, Houellebecq and Saramago); while some sociological accounts can be understood as pieces of literature, with a ‘literary imagination’ underpinning many sociological works (as with Denzin and Richardson).

 

In terms of cross-fertilisations, literary study has a long history of mining sociological theories and methodologies for the analysis of literary texts (as with Marxist literary studies and World Literature). More recently this has led to a rich sub-discipline that correlates literary forms and socio-economic processes via the work of Bourdieu and others. Literary theory, for its own part, has had a distinct impact on contemporary sociology, with the work of Said, Spivak and Jameson featuring prominently in sociology’s global or postcolonial turn.

 

And finally, literary works have historically worked as agents to foster reflection and political action on contemporary social issues (as with the work of Sinclair, Roy and El Saadawi). In this way, the intersection between sociology and literature can be used to focus and reflect on social issues like migration, racism and exploitation, serving activist projects and stimulating interventions into public life.

By reflecting on the productivity of these strands, we aim also to trace the difficulties and erasures which inhere as disciplinary objects are shifted and reconstituted, while bridging disciplinary parochialisms and reframing social and cultural issues beyond the confines of the university.

 

Thematic sessions and presentation topics for this conference may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Theories of the intersections between sociology and literature
  2. Historical perspectives on the intersections between sociology and literature
  3. Sociological fiction
  4. Marxism and literature: contemporary perspectives
  5. Bourdieusian approaches to literary analysis
  • Uses of literature and sociology that stimulate interventions into public life.

 

Keynote speakers will be:

  • Professor Mariano Longo (Università del Salento – Italy)
  • Second keynote TBC

 

We welcome both proposals for individual papers (20 minutes) and panels (1 hour/ 3–4 papers) that encourage a reflection on these intersections. Please send either a 250-word abstract for an individual paper proposal or a panel proposal of 900 words and a short biography to thirdcultureconference@gmail.com by 22 April 2019. Panel proposals should contain a brief description of the topic of the panel as well as the 3–4 abstracts that constitute the panel. Individual abstracts will be allocated a panel after review. Applicants will be notified by 26 April 2019.

 

Delegates to the conference will be expected to fund their own travel and accommodation. Thanks to our sponsors – the ESRC-DTC (University of Warwick) and the Social Theory Centre (University of Warwick) – the registration to the conference is free.

 

More information on https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/esrcdtc/news/literaturesociology

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CFP: Satellite – the School of Arts digital education subcommittee. Deadline 27 March 2019

This is a remind that Satellite – the School of Arts digital education subcommittee – has a Call for Proposals for exploratory events to take place in academic year 2018-19.

These exploratory events are an opportunity to explore more subject-, disciplinary- or problem-specific developments, innovations and issues related to digital education, and more generally the implications of new technologies for pedagogy and learning. You may, for instance, want to organise an event around alternative approaches to assessment that make use of techniques such as mobile video, social media or blogging. Or an event which considers innovative ways in-class learning experiences can be blended with online activities in-between sessions. Or the ways in which the digitalisation of our research objects or methods might shift how we teach and assess our subject areas. These examples are not exhaustive, and there are many other possibilities.

Exploratory events can be proposed by School academics, teaching and scholarship staff, administrative staff, as well as postgraduate research students. We are particularly keen to see more proposals from research students this year, so could doctoral supervisors please forward this on to their students – it’s a good opportunity for professional development.

Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis, through funds are limited. Your proposal must include the following:

  • Event Title
  • Event Convenor(s) (name and short bio / link to web profile)
  • Event Description (no more than 300 words)
  • Requested funding amount and its purpose(s) (e.g. catering costs – please specify if Satellite funding will be complemented by other funds, e.g. from department or research centre)

Please submit your proposal to Scott Rodgers at s.rodgers@bbk.ac.uk. Feel free to get in touch with Scott should you have any questions, or if you would like to discuss a potential idea further. Submissions will be accepted until 27 March 2019.

 

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CFP: New Voices in Postcolonial Studies Network – deadline 18 March 2019

The New Voices in Postcolonial Studies Network is pleased to announce that we are holding a symposium at the University of Leeds, the title of which is ‘Interdisciplinary Imaginations, Critical Confrontations: New Voices in Postcolonial Studies’, on Thursday 13th June 2019.

The symposium will provoke frank and urgent discussions on the aspirations of postcolonial research and evaluate the discipline’s role in intervening in the very real challenges affecting an increasingly uneven world. How can the imaginative or speculative stakes of postcolonial thought intersect with the so-called ‘material’ exigencies of the past or present? How might we work across other diverse fields and develop new voices for postcolonial study? How can we foster a PGR/ECR community interested in postcolonial studies, and make our voices heard?

We welcome 20-minute papers, presentations, or practice-based papers on any aspect of postcolonial research. Deadline for abstracts is Monday 18th March.

Professor John McLeod (University of Leeds) and Dr Amy Rushton (Nottingham Trent University) are the keynote speakers for this event, a range of invited panellists will join our conversations. See the attached CFP and for further details visit: https://newvoicespocostudies.wordpress.com/events/.

New Voices in Postcolonial Studies is a cross-DTP PGR-led network based in the midlands and north of England, aimed at PhD students and Early Career Researchers interested in Postcolonial Studies. We are sponsored by the White Rose College of Arts and Humanities, Midlands4Cities, Postcolonial Studies Association, Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies (Leeds), and the Postcolonial Studies Centre (NTU).

We look forward to receiving your abstracts,

Natalie Ilsley

Symposium Committee Member

newvoicespocostudies@gmail.com

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CFP: CYMERA – Scotland’s Festival of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Writing. Deadline 22 March 2019

CYMERA: Scotland’s Festival of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Writing

8-9 June 2019, The Pleasance, Edinburgh UK

CYMERA is a new literary festival launching this June in Edinburgh, Scotland’s first such festival devoted to science fiction, fantasy and horror writing. This ambitious event already  has a guest list of more than 60 authors from across all three genres (full programme to be announced in March at https://www.cymerafestival.co.uk/). Now the festival is inviting early career researchers to participate in its innovative academic strand with this call for papers.

The academic strand at CYMERA is free to attend, giving you and your research the chance to engage with the public as well as other academics. Presentations will be strictly limited to five minutes, but you will be presenting to a wider audience – and, potentially, a much bigger audience – than most purely academic conferences. With only five minutes to present, your paper should focus on the core argument or findings of your research in a dynamic manner. The most engaging papers from each Saturday session will be invited back for a second presentation on Sunday. One paper will be chosen to get presented in the festival’s main hall before a major guest event, with a potential public audience of up to 300 people. For further details about how the academic strand will work at the festival, email cymeracfp@gmail.com.

For the academic strand at CYMERA 2019, we are asking for papers that explore Scotland’s contribution to science fiction, fantasy and horror. That can range from writers and creators born in Scotland [from Stevenson and Conan Doyle to Iain Banks and beyond] to those who have made Scotland their home; from Scotland as a location for the genre’s narratives [such as Under the Skin by Michel Faber] to themes of Scottishness present in genre writing. Your paper may focus on one or more of the genres; it could look beyond prose fiction to consider science fiction, fantasy and horror in graphic novels and comics by Scottish creators; or at adaptations of Scottish science fiction, fantasy and horror narratives into other media.

We invite 100-word proposals for five (5) minute papers. Suggested topics include, but are certainly not limited to:

  • Scottish authors of the genres – past and present
  • Themes of Scottishness within the genres
  • Scotland as a location, be it rural, urban or both
  • Scotland’s role in the development of these genres
  • New theoretical perspectives on Scottish science fiction, fantasy and horror
  • Scotland’s influence on one or more of the three genres
  • Intersections, blends and hybrids within Scottish fictions of the genres
  • Scottish graphic novels and comic books within the genres, and their creators
  • Adaptations of Scottish science fiction, fantasy and horror
  • Scotland’s contribution to the genres in other media, such as games
  • Genre blending and bending in Scottish writing
  • Dualities in Scottish genre writing and its cities
  • Scotland as a filming location for science fiction, fantasy and horror film and TV

Please send your 100 word abstract with a biographical note of 50-75 words to cymeracfp@gmail.com no later than midday on Friday 22nd March 2019. Please direct all queries and enquiries to the same address.

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