CFP: Frankenstein Unbound – deadline Monday 18th June 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Arts University Bournemouth

Frankenstein Unbound: An Interdisciplinary Conference Exploring Mary Shelley and Gothic Legacies

Dates: Wednesday 31 October and Thursday 1 November 2018

Venues: Conference – St Peter’s Church, Bournemouth

Keynote Speakers:

Sir Christopher Frayling, Chancellor, Arts University Bournemouth

Professor Elaine Graham, University of Chester

Professor Sir Peter Cook, CRAB Studios (TBC)

In 1849, Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley’s heart were brought to the graveyard of St. Peter’s Church in Bournemouth, where they were buried with the remains of Mary Shelley’s parents Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin.

In 2018, Arts University Bournemouth and St. Peter’s Church, in association with Bournemouth University, celebrate the bicentenary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s most famous work Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (1818) as part of the Shelley Frankenstein Festival. The academic conference, located at this unique venue, will offer new and re-situated perspectives on Mary Shelley and her writings, her family and circle, and her most famous work.  We are pleased to acknowledge colleagues at Bournemouth University for their organisational support.

We invite papers and presentations themed around, but not limited to, the following:

  • Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, and the Romantics
  • Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley
  • Mary Shelley beyond Frankenstein
  • The Shelley family: history and legacy
  • Monstrous Romantics
  • Frankenstein and the sea
  • Theology and Frankenstein
  • Frankenstein and philosophy
  • Frankenstein at home and abroad
  • Adaptations and afterlives
  • Frankenstein and medical humanities
  • The abject and the sublime
  • Frankenstein and emotion
  • Guilt and crime in Frankenstein
  • Interpretations of Frankenstein in the creative industries (Film, Art, Theatre, Dance, Writing etc)
  • Mary Shelley and Gothic legacies
  • Gothic architecture
  • The Gothic imagination

We welcome proposals for themed panel sessions (maximum three papers), individual twenty-minute presentations, or creative submissions from practitioners and scholars of all fields. We particularly encourage submissions from post-graduate students and Early Career Researchers. Please submit an abstract (300 words) and short biography (100 words) to frankensteinunboundconference@gmail.com by Monday 18th June 2018.

For more information and updates visit our website: https://frankensteinunbound.wordpress.com/

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CFP: Symposium of Sound, Durham University – Deadline 14 June 2018

Call for Papers

‘The rest is silence’

Symposium of Sound

Durham University

3rd-4th September 2018

Keynote speakers and performers:

Professor Helen Abbott, Department of Modern Languages, University of Birmingham

Dr Edward Allen, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Aurélia Lassaque, bilingual poet and singer in French and Occitan

The Symposium of Sound is a two-day conference supported by Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership. We invite abstracts for papers of twenty minutes in length on the theme of ‘sound’: its creation, imitation, and its relationship with language. Proposals may range across fields of study, with interdisciplinary approaches particularly welcome in areas such as literature, music, performance and creative practice, modern languages, and linguistics. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Utterance, verbal and non-verbal
  • Metre, rhythm, and rhyme
  • Timbre and voicing
  • Pitch and tone
  • Echo and imitation
  • Song and lyric in performance and on the page
  • Phonetics and phonology
  • Soundscapes and sounds in place
  • Orality and aurality
  • Dialect and vernacularity
  • Gossip, rumour and bruit
  • Noise
  • Sound media (including radio and film)
  • Repetition
  • Silence and the absence of sound

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a short biography to symposiumofsound2018@gmail.com by 14th June 2018.

You can find further information on our conference website.

Keep up to date with the latest conference news by following us on Twitter on @sound_symposium and liking us on Facebook.

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Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018/19 – deadline 18 June 2018

Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19

Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) is currently planning its programme of events for 2018-19.

We welcome proposals from researchers and students working in any discipline or field across the Schools of Arts, Law, SSHP, and Science.

We are very happy to work in collaboration with research centres and institutes at Birkbeck or at other institutions.

All our events take place in the Birkbeck Cinema, typically on Friday evenings 6-9pm and Saturdays 10-5pm.

We can show films in 16mm and 35mm, as well as a variety of digital formats.

We are especially keen to foreground film and other moving image material that is rarely screened in public.

If you would like to propose an idea for an event, please use the following form:

BIMI Call for proposals 2018-19 and send it to bimi@bbk.ac.uk – the deadline for submission is the 18th of June.

Looking forward to hearing about your ideas.

Michael Temple, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Essay Film Festival

Matthew Barrington, interim BIMI Manager

Sign up to our newsletter: bimi@bbk.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Birkbeck_BIMI

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Birkbeck-Institute-for-the-Moving-Image-542278625939273/

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CFP Action: Arrest – Performance, protest, and the law deadline 11 June 2018

Action: Arrest 

Performance, protest, and the law

A one-day symposium

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Doyle (University of California, Riverside)

Join us in exploring the role of action and arrest in protest, law, and performance. Taking place during the year of the Suffragette centenary, the fifty-year anniversary of the Paris ‘68 uprisings, and a period of burgeoning civil unrest and political uncertainty in the UK and worldwide, Action: Arrest looks to assess and reassess the relationship between performance, protest, and the law. Inspired by their compelling dualities, the symposium aims to open up a new set of questions that may further complicate the relationship between these terms.

Recent and ongoing people-led political movements – for example, the March for Our Lives against current US gun laws, Yarl’s Wood #HungerForFreedom hunger strikes and #Stansted15 activists fighting against inhumane detention in the UK, and global campaigns to fight gendered and sexual violence with #MeToo and #TimesUp – contribute to the sense that we are in a moment of global action, where national and international uprisings are opening up new alternatives for social and political futures. At the same time, disparities in media representation, state reactions, and police response to different forms of activism expose tensions between the hope for positive change and forward momentum and the recreation and reinforcement of existing oppressions and dynamics of power. This conference asks where performance intervenes in these tensions, examining the value of reading protest as performance, particularly as it intersects with the law and disciplinary structures of power. Grounding itself in the current political moment, we hope the conference will provide an opportunity to engage with current and historical protest in its varying forms and varying spaces – the street, the theatre, the courtroom, and the gallery, amongst others – to analyse the relationship between performance, protest, and the law.

Interdisciplinary in its aims, Action: Arrest draws together academics, artists and practitioners from varying disciplines and their intersections. Honouring the constitutive links between methodologies, content, and form, Action: Arrest resists the cloistering control of academic tradition and discipline and encourages diversity, collaboration, and dissent. We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers, 10-minute provocations, and collaborative and performative papers. We are also very open to suggestions for alternative formats or styles of presentation not listed here.

Proposals for contributions that bear directly on one or more of the above themes are welcome. These might address:

  • Explorations of action and arrest as bodily and affective, and considerations of how they define different bodies.
  • Racialised, gendered and sexualised bodies in performance, protest and arrest.
  • Thinking through the relationship between movement, action, arrest, and stillness, and their relationship to political uprisings and the law.
  • How does action catalyse change, and how is action used as a means of control?
  • Affect as protest, the body protesting itself through exhaustion, fatigue, boredom, irritation, sweat, and excitement.
  • (Non)/Spectacular violence and protest.
  • Protest in and outside the museum, gallery and/or institutional setting (e.g. WHEREISANAMENDIETA, Liberate Tate etc).
  • Protest as the duality and contradictions of arrest as a control of bodies, and as a protection of bodies.
  • Explorations of restorative and transformative justice, penal reform, and abolitionism.
  • The influence of legal structures and policies on recent or historical actions and protests, with particular focus on how this has been used as a regulatory and disciplinary tool.
  • Protest, legal action, and minoritarian feminisms.
  • Resistance to repressive politics through action, arrest, stillness and movement.
  • Considerations of police behaviour, civil unrest, and dissonance. Moments of action and stillness between dissenters and those attempting to exert state control. (e.g. riot police and protesters, state or police interventions in performance works).
  • The relationship between arrest as being taken into legal custody, and arrest as inaction or stillness.
  • The capitulation of radicalism under neoliberal/late capitalist regimes.
  • Languages of visual activism.

Please send 250 word abstracts and 100 word bios and/or artist statements to actionarrest@gmail.com by the 11th of June 2018.

Bryony White and Savannah Whaley

King’s College London

www.actionarrest.wordpress.com

Kindly supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership

 

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CFP: DISTRACTION Birkbeck Institute for Social Research Graduate Conference – deadline 7 May 2018

The Call for Papers for the BISR annual graduate conference has been extended! The theme this year is DISTRACTION.

This conference aims to involve PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines and institutions. It is funded by the Birkbeck Institutes of Social ResearchGender and Sexuality, and Humanities

Dates: 8-9 June 2018

NEW DEADLINE: 7th May 2018. Please send 200 word abstracts and 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk. If you are also interested in taking part in the running of the event such as chairing a panel, please get in touch via this email.

We are delighted to confirm Prof. Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford) and Dr. Sophie Jones (Birkbeck, English) as our keynote speakers.

 

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/fellows-and-academic-staff/d/carolin-duttlinger

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/sophie-jones

 

Full details: http://bit.ly/2hCcxuq

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Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19 deadline 18 June 2018

Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19

Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) is currently planning its programme of events for 2018-19.

We welcome proposals from researchers and students working in any discipline or field across the Schools of Arts, Law, SSHP, and Science.

We are very happy to work in collaboration with research centres and institutes at Birkbeck or at other institutions.

All our events take place in the Birkbeck Cinema, typically on Friday evenings 6-9pm and Saturdays 10-5pm.

We can show films in 16mm and 35mm, as well as a variety of digital formats.

We are especially keen to foreground film and other moving image material that is rarely screened in public.

If you would like to propose an idea for an event, please use the attached form and send it to bimi@bbk.ac.uk – the deadline for submission is Friday 18 June.

Looking forward to hearing about your ideas.

Michael Temple, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Essay Film Festival

Matthew Barrington, interim BIMI Manager

Sign up to our newsletter: bimi@bbk.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Birkbeck_BIMI

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Birkbeck-Institute-for-the-Moving-Image-542278625939273/

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CFP: Visualising Asia: Deciphering ‘Otherness’ in Visual and Material Cultures – deadline 3 June 2018

Visualising Asia: Deciphering ‘Otherness’ in Visual and Material Cultures

SOAS, University of London

21st September 2018

Confirmed Keynote: Dr Anne Witchard

Historically, Asia has been a contended space of exploration and domination, where both Asian and non-Asian agents sought to define themselves against others. Within this broad historical and geographical context, this international and interdisciplinary conference brings together various forms of visuals, such as films, cartoons, and objects, in their interaction with discourses of ‘other’.  The platforms of visualising Asia were assimilated into daily life and practices, feeding into narratives that transcend any single medium. Due to their visual impact, they became lasting repositories of imagined identities and thus have critical implications for those representing and those being represented. This conference invites discussions on the differing ways ‘otherness’ has been used in both Asian and non-Asian societies through visuals. We encourage the participation from postgraduates, career researchers, scholars, curators, practitioners, and archivists.  The aim is to bring together an array of visualities from across various disciplines in order to reflect on the importance of visuals in knowledge production and circulation within and across cultures and societies.

Wider themes include: empire, multiculturalism, identity, nation, ethnic and cultural minorities, integration, ‘othering’, inclusion, exclusion, power dynamics, representation.

Papers or panels are invited on any topic related to the themes and questions explored in the conference that include but are limited to the following:

  • Representations of Asia by non-Asian cultures across different historical eras.
  • Representations of Asian societies by their neighbouring Asian countries.
  • Representations of minorities within hegemonic discourses in Asia.
  • Gender, ethnicity and class in visual othering of Asia.
  • How and why did representation occur, and the significance and impact for those being represented and those representing.
  • The development of concepts of identity through the use of visual and/or material culture.
  • The politics involved in visual knowledge production.
  • Long-term effects and consequences of visual representations of Asia.
  • The relationship between power and representation. The limits of ‘othering’ and representation.
  • Images of Asia and the development of visual and material industries.
  • Approaches and/or practices in cataloguing images of Asia in archives..

Panels and individual submissions are welcomed.  Please send queries and abstracts of 250-350 words, along with a brief bio of no more than 100 words, to visualisingasia@gmail.com by 3 June 2018.

The conference convenors are Amy Matthewson (SOAS, University of London), and Dr Irene González-López (Kingston University).

 

 

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CFP – Sound and Silence – GLITS – 4 May 2018

GLITS Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference 2018:

Sound and Silence

Date: June 8th 2018

Venue: Goldsmiths, University of London

Website: https://glits4.wixsite.com/mysite 

 

Plenary speaker: Dr Holly Pester, University of Essex

Holly Pester is a poet and lecturer at the University of Essex, working in sound, song and speech-based poetics.

“I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.”

Audre Lorde, Your Silence Will Not Protect You

“I came to think that silence may be the only ‘place’ in which the boundaries of the autonomous self can dissolve, can be penetrated without breaking.”

Sara Maitland, A Book of Silence

Sound and silence occupy an inherently complex and paradoxical relation to meaning, as both its antithesis and its very essence. Sound figures as both Pope’s “echo to the sense” and the irrefutable noise of the Real. Silence designates absence and the impossibility thereof, as Cage famously proclaimed, “I have nothing to say and I am saying it.” How these sonic signals are interpreted and contested determines who can speak, who makes noise, who is silenced – which subjects are permitted and legitimised and which are discredited and repressed.

Anne Carson sees the dichotomy of sound as irrevocably gendered due to the patriarchal insistence toward logos, whereby male speech is valorised as the standard-bearer for rationality and female “noise” is perceived as dangerous and disruptive. For Friedrich Kittler, the advent of mechanical storage signals not just a shift in technics but the arrival of a new episteme. Since mechanical ears do not differentiate acoustic events like human ones are trained to, the meaningless and the accidental become as relevant as the deliberate and the symbolic. Psychoanalysis, then, finds its epistemology a matter of phonography, redoubling the policing of human sounds as either normative or pathological.

Harold Pinter once said, ‘I think that we communicate only too well, in our silence, in what is unsaid, and that what takes place is a continual evasion, desperate rearguard attempt to keep ourselves to ourselves.’ Culturally and politically, silence represents the interstices between thought and language, where that which is refused expression is captured in a state of iteration. Phonic expression, then, is threatening both for its capacities and its limitations.

Sound and Silence is an interdisciplinary postgraduate conference held on 8 June 2018, hosted by the Goldsmiths Literature Seminar (GLITS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, bringing together scholars across multiple fields to ask: how do we recognise, break and rebuild boundaries through phonic utterance and expression? What part does silence play in psycho- and socio-logical development and how do we attune ourselves to its cacophony of meanings?

We invite proposals from various disciplines and historical periods – papers, creative pieces, readings – covering such possible topics as:

  • Sound and silence in the humanities
  • Architecture
  • Identity
  • Race
  • Soundscapes/silentscapes
  • Phono-semantics
  • Textual methodology
  • Spoken word
  • Speech: dialects/accents
  • Gender
  • Religious
  • Speaking out and speaking back
  • Acts of silencing

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words or examples of creative work along with a brief bio to glits@gold.ac.uk by Friday 4th May.

 

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Call for Papers: Are we Living in an Age of Distraction? – Deadline: 26 April 2018

Call for Papers: Are we Living in an Age of Distraction?

Graduate Student Conference
Organized by Birkbeck Institute of Humanities, Birkbeck Institute for Social Research and Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality

Birkbeck, University of London (Room, TBA)
Keynote Speakers TBA

8 & 9 June 2018

Deadline: 26 April 2018
Please send a 200 word abstract for papers of 15 minutes and a 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk

This conference explores distraction and all its meanings and implications. Distraction is commonly thought of as a growing concern or even a sickness of modern society and digital culture. From mindless scrolling to heavy consumerism, the pursuit for entertainment and satisfaction is insatiable, leaving us vulnerable to ruling corporations. Does our lack of control transform us into a conformed mass that is susceptible to tabloid media and the rise of populism? On the other hand, distraction is not necessarily steeped in negativity. In fact, it has had a long and fascinating history. Its German equivalent, ‘Zerstreuung’, comes from the idea of dispersion. At the start of the twentieth-century, Walter Benjamin defined the term as ‘floating attention’, where experience is caused by chance rather than concentration. Does lack of focus in fact allow a sense of freedom and inspiration?

Age of Distraction is a chance for an enriching discussion between MA, PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines.

Topics to include:

  • History of distraction
  • Distraction and its oppositions
  • Distraction and/in Education
  • Distraction and madness
  • Modes of Extremism: online or in reality?
  • Democracy, populism, and online social networking
  • Freedom of speech v. government and/or regulatory control
  • Misinformation and fake news
  • Dystopia/ an Orwellian society
  • Distraction and creativity
  • Escapism, dream and day-dream
  • Feigned ignorance or ‘Turning a blind eye’
  • Emotional responses
  • Procrastination, boredom and solitude
  • Wandering and ‘killing time’
  • Inspiration, chance and serendipity

Of course, distraction can be considered from numerous perspectives:

Arts and Humanities

Distraction as a literary theme can be found in many forms, from dystopia to escapist fiction. Reading itself has been thought to have a negative impact on cognitivity and morality, the development of the popular novel suspected as a dangerous commodity. After WW1, new cinema and photography brought a wave of anxiety about modern man’s splintered focus and new perceptions. Distraction could also be a curse and blessing to the creative process, especially in the pursuit of originality. Diderot wrote in his Encyclopédie that: ‘Distraction arises from an excellent quality of the understanding, which allows the ideas to strike against, or reawaken one another’. How does this statement apply to areas such as writing, painting or film-making? Is writer’s block and procrastination a suspended state in which ideas are waiting to ‘reawaken’ or simply a result of laziness and denial?

Social Sciences

Although social media has given a platform to previously unheard voices, it is also susceptible to manipulation, as recent scandals have made clear. In this context, to what extent can social media still be considered a progressive platform for political action?  Should social media be regulated, and if so how, by whom and on what criteria? Does today’s open platform really represent shared global perspectives, or does it magnify the voice of those who already have power and influence? How does use of social media relate to dominant economic ideologies, and the ‘neoliberalisation’ of leisure time and social relations?

There is widespread concern that social media can be a major source of ‘mass distraction from real life conditions. Today’s technological advances raise a number of concerns: In what ways do social media influence public opinion and political participation, and do they provide channels for public deliberation? Is scepticism becoming dominant in response to the rise of the concept of ‘fake news’? Are social scientists equipped with adequate theoretical tools to make sense of the sociopolitical changes accompanying unceasingly evolving communication technologies?

Law and Criminology  

Distraction is also relevant to our legal and criminal justice system. Last year, the English High Court in Monroe v Hopkins [2017] EWHC had to decide what constitutes ‘serious harm’ following a Twitter war between Jack Monroe and Katie Hopkins. Legislatures around the world are examining Facebook’s internal policies and procedures as they relate to the dissemination of extremist material, hate speech and bullying. Constitutionally protected rights to freedom of speech and expression are clashing with individual claims asking for respect for private and family life.  What is becoming clear is that traditional legal frameworks regulating twentieth century media are not adapt to a twenty first century world. From this perspective, the law now needs to consider both ‘the distracted’ and ‘the distractor’. Inevitably, topics that critically engage with privacy and surveillance, control society and fundamental human rights need to be discussed.

Food and refreshments will be available.

The annual Birkbeck Graduate Conference is organised by the the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality. The Institutes’ interns for the current academic year take the lead on organising the conference.

Meet our interns for 2017-18: Azzam Al Kassir, Harooon Forde, Devin Frank, Pauline Suwanban.

We are currently recruiting PhD students to join the Working Party to help organise the conference. If you are a current Birkbeck PhD student and are interested in gaining the experience of organising an international conference please contact us on .

Previous conferences:

 

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