CFP: Annual Tennyson Society Conference, Christ Church, Oxford – Deadline: 12 October 2018

Annual Tennyson Society Conference, Christ Church, Oxford

30-31 March 2019

Keynotes: Professor Michael O’Neill (University of Durham)
Professor Leonée Ormond (King’s College, London)
Professor Seamus Perry (University of Oxford)
Dr Jane Wright ()
Convenor: Dr Michael Sullivan (University of Oxford)
Location: Christ Church, Oxford
Deadline: 12 October 2018

The 2019 Annual Tennyson Society Conference will be hosted at Christ Church, Oxford – the college of Henry Hallam and of William Gladstone, who was instrumental in securing Tennyson’s peerage.
The conference will include keynote lectures by Professor Michael O’Neill (Durham), Professor Leonée Ormond (King’s College, London), Professor Seamus Perry (Oxford), and Dr Jane Wright (Bristol).
Their lectures will be accompanied by three panels of twenty-minute papers on topics relating to any aspect of Tennyson’s works, reception, and literary circle. Those interested in speaking are invited to submit proposals of no more than 300 words, alongside a short biographical statement, to the conference convenor by 12 October 2018 (at michael.sullivan@chch.ox.ac.uk).

Christ Church has a rich literary history, including links to W. H. Auden and to Lewis Carroll, collections of whose manuscripts are kept in the Upper Library. Founded in 1546, the college is home to Oxford’s cathedral and houses a picture gallery, which displays paintings by Filippino Lippi, Tintoretto, Anthony van Dyck, and Frans Hals. On 30 March there will be a workshop in the college’s Upper Library, and a conference dinner in the college Hall. Accommodation in the college will be available for the nights of the Friday and Saturday (29th and 30th March).
We are especially keen to encourage postgraduates and early career academics, and plan to convene a panel for new researchers. All speakers and delegates would be asked to join the Tennyson Society (£14/€20/$40 for personal membership), which includes access to the latest Tennyson research through the Tennyson Research Bulletin, the society’s occasional papers, and digital delivery of its newsletter.

If you would like to receive a notification when registration opens, please let us know at
michael.sullivan@chch.ox.ac.uk.

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CFP – Sound and Silence – GLITS – 4 May 2018

GLITS Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference 2018:

Sound and Silence

Date: June 8th 2018

Venue: Goldsmiths, University of London

Website: https://glits4.wixsite.com/mysite 

 

Plenary speaker: Dr Holly Pester, University of Essex

Holly Pester is a poet and lecturer at the University of Essex, working in sound, song and speech-based poetics.

“I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.”

Audre Lorde, Your Silence Will Not Protect You

“I came to think that silence may be the only ‘place’ in which the boundaries of the autonomous self can dissolve, can be penetrated without breaking.”

Sara Maitland, A Book of Silence

Sound and silence occupy an inherently complex and paradoxical relation to meaning, as both its antithesis and its very essence. Sound figures as both Pope’s “echo to the sense” and the irrefutable noise of the Real. Silence designates absence and the impossibility thereof, as Cage famously proclaimed, “I have nothing to say and I am saying it.” How these sonic signals are interpreted and contested determines who can speak, who makes noise, who is silenced – which subjects are permitted and legitimised and which are discredited and repressed.

Anne Carson sees the dichotomy of sound as irrevocably gendered due to the patriarchal insistence toward logos, whereby male speech is valorised as the standard-bearer for rationality and female “noise” is perceived as dangerous and disruptive. For Friedrich Kittler, the advent of mechanical storage signals not just a shift in technics but the arrival of a new episteme. Since mechanical ears do not differentiate acoustic events like human ones are trained to, the meaningless and the accidental become as relevant as the deliberate and the symbolic. Psychoanalysis, then, finds its epistemology a matter of phonography, redoubling the policing of human sounds as either normative or pathological.

Harold Pinter once said, ‘I think that we communicate only too well, in our silence, in what is unsaid, and that what takes place is a continual evasion, desperate rearguard attempt to keep ourselves to ourselves.’ Culturally and politically, silence represents the interstices between thought and language, where that which is refused expression is captured in a state of iteration. Phonic expression, then, is threatening both for its capacities and its limitations.

Sound and Silence is an interdisciplinary postgraduate conference held on 8 June 2018, hosted by the Goldsmiths Literature Seminar (GLITS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, bringing together scholars across multiple fields to ask: how do we recognise, break and rebuild boundaries through phonic utterance and expression? What part does silence play in psycho- and socio-logical development and how do we attune ourselves to its cacophony of meanings?

We invite proposals from various disciplines and historical periods – papers, creative pieces, readings – covering such possible topics as:

  • Sound and silence in the humanities
  • Architecture
  • Identity
  • Race
  • Soundscapes/silentscapes
  • Phono-semantics
  • Textual methodology
  • Spoken word
  • Speech: dialects/accents
  • Gender
  • Religious
  • Speaking out and speaking back
  • Acts of silencing

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words or examples of creative work along with a brief bio to glits@gold.ac.uk by Friday 4th May.

 

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CFP: Waste: A Symposium 21 September 17 (cfp deadline 1 May 2017)

Waste: A Symposium

Papers on Disposability, Decay, and Depletion    

A one-day event to be held at Birkbeck College, University of London, on 21 September 2017.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Professor Esther Leslie (Birkbeck, University of London)
  • Dr Leo Mellor (University of Cambridge)
  • Dr Rachele Dini (UCL / University of Cambridge)

Conference overview:

This one-day interdisciplinary event will make visible the untold story of waste by exploring its representations, both material and metaphorical, within contemporary culture. Through an investigation of waste’s presence (or lack thereof) within modern life, this conference will disrupt the entrenched value judgements surrounding objects, places and people otherwise deemed redundant. By exploring how we create, classify and treat waste material this discussion will simultaneously review and challenge the ethics of human waste(-ing); the marginalisation of populations rendered disposable within a globalised socio-economic framework. Calling on related discourses from the arts, social sciences, medical humanities and beyond, this symposium will bring together a diverse mix of academics, artists and industry experts to share insights on a (waste) matter that impacts and implicates us all.

The event will be free to attend, with lunch and refreshments provided on the day and a drinks reception for attendees and speakers in the evening.

Call for papers:

Proposals are invited for twenty minute papers which will be presented in panels of three. Abstracts of up to 500 words should be submitted to:

wasteconference2017.mailbox@bbk.ac.uk by the 1st of May 2017. Please also include a short bio (no more than 150 words), contact details, and any institutional or industry affiliation.

Possible paper topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Pollution and toxicity (e.g. physical / metaphorical, environmental, social)
  • Junk, dirt and rubbish (e.g. the abject, hygiene, creation of)
  • Decomposition and decay (e.g. illness, corpses, physical ‘wasting’)
  • The temporality of waste (e.g. ‘wasting time’, aging and depletion)
  • The geography of waste (e.g. LULUs, derelict spaces, wastelands)
  • Literatures of waste (e.g. fiction about waste, recycling, printing)
  • Human waste / Wasted humans (e.g. bodily matter, biopolitics of disposability)
  • Petrocultures and industrial waste (e.g. extraction, environmental damage of)
  • Economies of waste (e.g. commodification, the cost of waste, disposal industries).

Following the conference, there will be the opportunity to submit papers for a Special Collection in the Open Library of Humanities (8000 words, peer reviewed) and Alluvium Journal (2000 words, non-peer reviewed).

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DANDELION: Call for Submissions on The Contemporary

Call for Papers: Dandelion Journal

The Dandelion editors seek submissions on the theme of THE CONTEMPORARY for their forthcoming issue.

When will the contemporary end? When did it begin?

Contemporary cultural production and questions about the nature of contemporaneity itself have become dominant in recent scholarship but just what is ‘the contemporary’? What type of creative and scholarly work is being done under its aura? Should we apprehend the contemporary as a noun, offering definition and order to a discrete period in history; or is it rather as an adjective, traced with a particular structure of feeling, an interdisciplinary apprehension to what is happening Now and an anxiety towards what comes next?

We seek submissions that address how the social, political and aesthetic dilemmas that characterize our present are made manifest in the twenty-first century’s cultural production. For instance, if the contemporary is the cultural logic of neoliberal capitalism made tangible, then how can its ‘common sense’ be registered, revised, or resisted? Is the contemporary experienced similarly across the globe, or are its pressure points, modes and sites of dissent different depending on their location? How might we pull on the emergency brake?

We are also keen to examine emergent methodologies and debates that offer a barometer of the contemporary in humanities scholarship. For example, how to explicate ‘the contemporary’ is a matter of anxiety for art history: does the term simply denote a period that came after the modern, or were all works of art once contemporary? And what are the conceptual tools and interpretive frameworks we need to study contemporary writing in the present age? As literary scholars have noted, one of the defining features of twenty-first century fiction is the return of the novel about time. How, might we ask, are time and space to be negotiated in an era of transnational literary form and planetary ruination? Finally, we wish also to consider the fate of the humanities, and academic labour itself, inside the contemporary University.

The journal invites submissions from postgraduate students and early career scholars that address the theme of the contemporary across the spectrum of Arts and Humanities research.

Topics could include, but are by no means restricted to:

  • Periodisation and the competing temporalities of ‘the contemporary’ across the humanities: Beyond –modernisms, ‘Post-Post’?
  • Methodological shifts in the humanities: Digital Humanities, Medical Humanities, World Literature, Post-Critical.
  • Tone and the contemporary’s affective intensities: Hope and Pessimism, Anxiety and Belonging.
  • The Anthropocene: Environment and Ecocriticism.
  • Mapping the networks and flows of Late Capitalism and Neoliberalism: Towards a contemporary realism?
  • Contemporary Resistances: Digital Commons, the Hacker, Occupy, Black Lives Matter, Indigenous Social Movements.
  • Human, Non-Human, Post-Human: Artificial Intelligence, Prosthetics, and Augmented Reality; Embodiment and Subjectivity.
  • The Future of the Novel: Transnational, Graphic, Documentary, Historical, Science Fiction.
  • The Production, Philosophy, Criticism, and Curating of Contemporary Art.
  • The Relation between Contemporary Art and Art History.

Submission guidelines

We welcome short articles of 3000-5000 words, long articles of 5000-8000 words and critical reviews of books, film, and exhibitions. We also strongly encourage submissions of artwork including visual art; creative writing; podcasts and video footage (up to 10 minutes). We would be happy to discuss ideas for submissions with interested authors prior to the submission deadline.

Please send all completed submissions to mail@dandelionjournal.org by 6th February 2017.

Please also include a 50-word author biography and a 200-300-word abstract alongside your submission. All referencing and style is required in full MHRA format as a condition of publication and submitted articles should be academically rigorous and ready for immediate publication.

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