CFP: London Nineteenth-Century Studies Graduate Conference – December 14 2018

This year’s London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar Graduate Conference will take place on Saturday 19th January 2019 at Senate House, University of London.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Regenia Gagnier (Exeter): ‘Global Circulation and the Long Nineteenth Century’

We welcome proposals for ten-minute papers on any aspect of literature, culture, art, and history in the long nineteenth century.
Themes may include, but are not limited to:

– Media and technology
– Art, architecture, and aesthetics
– Social and cultural history
– Production of literary cultures
– Gender and sexuality
– Performance and the spectacle
– Religion and ethics
– Representations of Empire

The conference is intended as a cross- and inter-disciplinary forum where postgraduate researchers working on any aspect of the long nineteenth century can present and discuss their research in a supportive and stimulating environment.

Please send abstracts of 200 words, along with a short biography (50 words) to 19thGradSymposium@gmail.com by 14tDecember 2018. The committee will confirm your inclusion in the programme shortly after that date.

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CFP: Memory and Borders: Examining Nationalism and Identity Through Material Culture – Deadline 15 December

Call For Participants:

Memory and Borders: Examining Nationalism and Identity Through Material Culture

Borders, their effect and their history, have become a recurring theme of global politics today; Brexit and the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, diplomatic negotiations between North and South Korea and the history of the Berlin wall are examples of stories that have occupied discourse on the concept of borders. While nations may be a modern geopolitical category, their physical demarcations have had significant influence on the formation of memory and identity. Thus, to what extent are our shared or individual memories shaped or limited by borders? How do geopolitical boundaries influence a sense of national identity? What is the legacy of a national ‘border’?

This is a call for participants to engage in a workshop discussing memory and borders. Its purpose is to encourage cross-disciplinary discourse on the theme of memory and borders. Students, academics, designers, artists, philosophers, writers, journalists, filmmakers, thinkers and creators will come together to foster a conversation concerning the idea of the ‘border’ as a material or ideological barrier or impasse and the impact that these borders have on individual and collective memory. We will discuss ideas around the theme of “Memory and Borders” through material cultures, in a discursive format that includes work and research (-in progress) presentations, and round-table discussions. Abstracts of work, and work in progress can be based on, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • National identity and memory
  • Conflict and memory
  • Violence and trauma in memory
  • Material culture and memory
  • Materiality of borders
  • Nationalism, fracture, independence, identity and divisions through objects
  • Gerrymandering and democracy

Please send a (maximum) 150-word abstract to memoryandborders@gmail.com by 17:00 on December 15, 2018.

This event will be held on February 11, 2019 at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK. Participants that will be selected to present will be compensated for travel (from within London).

This event will be made possible with the generous help of the Design History Society Outreach & Events Grant.

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Satellite – School of Arts digital education subcommittee: Call for Proposals

Dear School of Arts,

Satellite – the School of Arts digital education subcommittee – is pleased to announce a Call for Proposals for exploratory events to take place in academic year 2018-19.

These exploratory events are an opportunity to explore more subject-, disciplinary- or problem-specific developments, innovations and issues related to digital education, and more generally the implications of new technologies for pedagogy and learning. You may, for instance, want to organise an event around alternative approaches to assessment that make use of techniques such as mobile video, social media or blogging. Or an event which considers innovative ways in-class learning experiences can be blended with online activities in-between sessions. Or the ways in which the digitalisation of our research objects or methods might shift how we teach and assess our subject areas. These examples are not exhaustive, and there are many other possibilities.

Exploratory events can be proposed by School academics, teaching and scholarship staff, administrative staff, as well as postgraduate research students. We are particularly keen to see more proposals from research students this year, so could doctoral supervisors please forward this on to their students – it’s a good opportunity for professional development.

Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis, through funds are limited. Your proposal must include the following:

  • Event Title
  • Event Convenor(s) (name and short bio / link to web profile)
  • Event Description (no more than 300 words)

Requested funding amount and its purpose(s) (e.g. catering costs – please specify if Satellite funding will be complemented by other funds, e.g. from department or research centre)

Please submit your proposal to Scott Rodgers at s.rodgers@bbk.ac.uk. Feel free to get in touch with Scott should you have any questions, or if you would like to discuss a potential idea further.

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CFP: Imagining the Apocalypse Saturday 12 October 2019

IMAGINING THE APOCALYPSE: CALL FOR PAPERS

12 October 2019, The Courtauld Institute of Art

Shaped by different religious traditions, the apocalypse has been called upon throughout history to articulate collective anxieties, act as a warning, or a yearned-for spiritual salvation. These contradictory and competing aims behind imagining the end of the world in specific cultural moments make it a fertile ground for analysis. This conference will ask: what are the politics of picturing annihilation, from the early Christian Church to climate change today? This call for papers welcomes submissions from all historical periods and geographic regions. From medieval mosaics to Hieronymus Bosh, Albrecht Dürer’s woodcut The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1498) to Keith Piper’s critique of Thatcherite-era racism, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1984) – culture has played a crucial role in imagining the apocalypse.

 

Claiming the end is nigh has always been political. The Democratic Unionist Party’s 1970s ‘Save Ulster from Sodomy’ campaign, for example, invoked the threat of Biblical floods: “The legalising of homosexuality would open the floodgates of immorality … The consequences of such a deluge would be grim”. What does this nightmarish vision tell us about the way we direct violence at others when fearing for our own survival? Rather than call for a saviour and salvation, could there also be an opportunity to contemplate and perhaps even come to terms with feelings of powerlessness in the face of our own annihilation? If the apocalypse is employed as a metaphor – a framework for conceiving reality, rather than a faithful portrait of it – it is regularly used to describe situations that are not literally the end of the world.

 

If we scratch under the surface, doomsday is often evoked time and time again to articulate a worldview of ‘us’ versus ‘them’: the desire to re-establish a sense of mastery over those perceived to be threatening. In 2017 The Sun claimed Jeremy Corbyn “would be a disaster in No10” – printing 1970s photographs of warehouses filled with coffins and rubbish piled high in the streets; while The Guardian wondered “How soon will the ‘ice apocalypse’ come?” and “are we sleepwalking towards a technological apocalypse?” – telling readers to look out for “Seven signs of the neoliberal apocalypse”. In January, online blogs asked “Is the fatberg apocalypse upon us?” – and in June The Sunday Times reported a UK government “Doomsday” plan for Brexit. By August, The Times reeled in horror at the “End of days feel in Westminster”.

 

Twenty-four hours later, historian David Olusoga warned: “Just as today’s historians are struck by the parties and general joviality that characterised the long hot summer of 1914, future scholars might wonder how we remained so calm as we approached the edge of the cliff”. The fear that underscores these catastrophic accounts may be sincere, but if we take a step back from the immediate sense of dread they provoke – how can we unpack the politics and psychoanalytic stakes at play? Can we look across time and space to make sense of how such anxieties are intimately bound up with their specific historical moments, and that considering them comparatively can throw into relief how power and violence often fuel these fantasies of disaster? This interdisciplinary conference welcomes proposals that consider imaginative representations of the end of the world from antiquity to the present day.

 

Potential topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Gender studies, LGBTQ+ politics, heterosexuality
  • Migration, racism, empire, whiteness
  • Industrial Revolution, fossil fuels, nuclear meltdown/war, climate change
  • Food, eating, starvation, stockpiling
  • Financial crisis and disaster capitalism
  • Religious art
  • Technological change (e.g. the invention of telecommunication/artificial intelligence)
  • The Gothic, nightmares, monsters, magic, zombies, contagion, disease, the occult, spiritualism
  • Nationalism, conflict, civil war, group identity and collective violence, terrorism, anti-war activism
  • Generational change and inter-generational conflict
  • Visions of the future and science fiction
  • Moral panics, addition as metaphor, fears of societal collapse
  • Dark tourism and the entertainment industry

Please send a short bio with proposals of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers to edwin.coomasaru@courtauld.ac.uk by 14th January 2019.

 

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CFP: Annual Tennyson Society Conference, Christ Church, Oxford – Deadline: 12 October 2018

Annual Tennyson Society Conference, Christ Church, Oxford

30-31 March 2019

Keynotes: Professor Michael O’Neill (University of Durham)
Professor Leonée Ormond (King’s College, London)
Professor Seamus Perry (University of Oxford)
Dr Jane Wright ()
Convenor: Dr Michael Sullivan (University of Oxford)
Location: Christ Church, Oxford
Deadline: 12 October 2018

The 2019 Annual Tennyson Society Conference will be hosted at Christ Church, Oxford – the college of Henry Hallam and of William Gladstone, who was instrumental in securing Tennyson’s peerage.
The conference will include keynote lectures by Professor Michael O’Neill (Durham), Professor Leonée Ormond (King’s College, London), Professor Seamus Perry (Oxford), and Dr Jane Wright (Bristol).
Their lectures will be accompanied by three panels of twenty-minute papers on topics relating to any aspect of Tennyson’s works, reception, and literary circle. Those interested in speaking are invited to submit proposals of no more than 300 words, alongside a short biographical statement, to the conference convenor by 12 October 2018 (at michael.sullivan@chch.ox.ac.uk).

Christ Church has a rich literary history, including links to W. H. Auden and to Lewis Carroll, collections of whose manuscripts are kept in the Upper Library. Founded in 1546, the college is home to Oxford’s cathedral and houses a picture gallery, which displays paintings by Filippino Lippi, Tintoretto, Anthony van Dyck, and Frans Hals. On 30 March there will be a workshop in the college’s Upper Library, and a conference dinner in the college Hall. Accommodation in the college will be available for the nights of the Friday and Saturday (29th and 30th March).
We are especially keen to encourage postgraduates and early career academics, and plan to convene a panel for new researchers. All speakers and delegates would be asked to join the Tennyson Society (£14/€20/$40 for personal membership), which includes access to the latest Tennyson research through the Tennyson Research Bulletin, the society’s occasional papers, and digital delivery of its newsletter.

If you would like to receive a notification when registration opens, please let us know at
michael.sullivan@chch.ox.ac.uk.

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CFP – Sound and Silence – GLITS – 4 May 2018

GLITS Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference 2018:

Sound and Silence

Date: June 8th 2018

Venue: Goldsmiths, University of London

Website: https://glits4.wixsite.com/mysite 

 

Plenary speaker: Dr Holly Pester, University of Essex

Holly Pester is a poet and lecturer at the University of Essex, working in sound, song and speech-based poetics.

“I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.”

Audre Lorde, Your Silence Will Not Protect You

“I came to think that silence may be the only ‘place’ in which the boundaries of the autonomous self can dissolve, can be penetrated without breaking.”

Sara Maitland, A Book of Silence

Sound and silence occupy an inherently complex and paradoxical relation to meaning, as both its antithesis and its very essence. Sound figures as both Pope’s “echo to the sense” and the irrefutable noise of the Real. Silence designates absence and the impossibility thereof, as Cage famously proclaimed, “I have nothing to say and I am saying it.” How these sonic signals are interpreted and contested determines who can speak, who makes noise, who is silenced – which subjects are permitted and legitimised and which are discredited and repressed.

Anne Carson sees the dichotomy of sound as irrevocably gendered due to the patriarchal insistence toward logos, whereby male speech is valorised as the standard-bearer for rationality and female “noise” is perceived as dangerous and disruptive. For Friedrich Kittler, the advent of mechanical storage signals not just a shift in technics but the arrival of a new episteme. Since mechanical ears do not differentiate acoustic events like human ones are trained to, the meaningless and the accidental become as relevant as the deliberate and the symbolic. Psychoanalysis, then, finds its epistemology a matter of phonography, redoubling the policing of human sounds as either normative or pathological.

Harold Pinter once said, ‘I think that we communicate only too well, in our silence, in what is unsaid, and that what takes place is a continual evasion, desperate rearguard attempt to keep ourselves to ourselves.’ Culturally and politically, silence represents the interstices between thought and language, where that which is refused expression is captured in a state of iteration. Phonic expression, then, is threatening both for its capacities and its limitations.

Sound and Silence is an interdisciplinary postgraduate conference held on 8 June 2018, hosted by the Goldsmiths Literature Seminar (GLITS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, bringing together scholars across multiple fields to ask: how do we recognise, break and rebuild boundaries through phonic utterance and expression? What part does silence play in psycho- and socio-logical development and how do we attune ourselves to its cacophony of meanings?

We invite proposals from various disciplines and historical periods – papers, creative pieces, readings – covering such possible topics as:

  • Sound and silence in the humanities
  • Architecture
  • Identity
  • Race
  • Soundscapes/silentscapes
  • Phono-semantics
  • Textual methodology
  • Spoken word
  • Speech: dialects/accents
  • Gender
  • Religious
  • Speaking out and speaking back
  • Acts of silencing

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words or examples of creative work along with a brief bio to glits@gold.ac.uk by Friday 4th May.

 

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CFP: Waste: A Symposium 21 September 17 (cfp deadline 1 May 2017)

Waste: A Symposium

Papers on Disposability, Decay, and Depletion    

A one-day event to be held at Birkbeck College, University of London, on 21 September 2017.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Professor Esther Leslie (Birkbeck, University of London)
  • Dr Leo Mellor (University of Cambridge)
  • Dr Rachele Dini (UCL / University of Cambridge)

Conference overview:

This one-day interdisciplinary event will make visible the untold story of waste by exploring its representations, both material and metaphorical, within contemporary culture. Through an investigation of waste’s presence (or lack thereof) within modern life, this conference will disrupt the entrenched value judgements surrounding objects, places and people otherwise deemed redundant. By exploring how we create, classify and treat waste material this discussion will simultaneously review and challenge the ethics of human waste(-ing); the marginalisation of populations rendered disposable within a globalised socio-economic framework. Calling on related discourses from the arts, social sciences, medical humanities and beyond, this symposium will bring together a diverse mix of academics, artists and industry experts to share insights on a (waste) matter that impacts and implicates us all.

The event will be free to attend, with lunch and refreshments provided on the day and a drinks reception for attendees and speakers in the evening.

Call for papers:

Proposals are invited for twenty minute papers which will be presented in panels of three. Abstracts of up to 500 words should be submitted to:

wasteconference2017.mailbox@bbk.ac.uk by the 1st of May 2017. Please also include a short bio (no more than 150 words), contact details, and any institutional or industry affiliation.

Possible paper topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Pollution and toxicity (e.g. physical / metaphorical, environmental, social)
  • Junk, dirt and rubbish (e.g. the abject, hygiene, creation of)
  • Decomposition and decay (e.g. illness, corpses, physical ‘wasting’)
  • The temporality of waste (e.g. ‘wasting time’, aging and depletion)
  • The geography of waste (e.g. LULUs, derelict spaces, wastelands)
  • Literatures of waste (e.g. fiction about waste, recycling, printing)
  • Human waste / Wasted humans (e.g. bodily matter, biopolitics of disposability)
  • Petrocultures and industrial waste (e.g. extraction, environmental damage of)
  • Economies of waste (e.g. commodification, the cost of waste, disposal industries).

Following the conference, there will be the opportunity to submit papers for a Special Collection in the Open Library of Humanities (8000 words, peer reviewed) and Alluvium Journal (2000 words, non-peer reviewed).

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DANDELION: Call for Submissions on The Contemporary

Call for Papers: Dandelion Journal

The Dandelion editors seek submissions on the theme of THE CONTEMPORARY for their forthcoming issue.

When will the contemporary end? When did it begin?

Contemporary cultural production and questions about the nature of contemporaneity itself have become dominant in recent scholarship but just what is ‘the contemporary’? What type of creative and scholarly work is being done under its aura? Should we apprehend the contemporary as a noun, offering definition and order to a discrete period in history; or is it rather as an adjective, traced with a particular structure of feeling, an interdisciplinary apprehension to what is happening Now and an anxiety towards what comes next?

We seek submissions that address how the social, political and aesthetic dilemmas that characterize our present are made manifest in the twenty-first century’s cultural production. For instance, if the contemporary is the cultural logic of neoliberal capitalism made tangible, then how can its ‘common sense’ be registered, revised, or resisted? Is the contemporary experienced similarly across the globe, or are its pressure points, modes and sites of dissent different depending on their location? How might we pull on the emergency brake?

We are also keen to examine emergent methodologies and debates that offer a barometer of the contemporary in humanities scholarship. For example, how to explicate ‘the contemporary’ is a matter of anxiety for art history: does the term simply denote a period that came after the modern, or were all works of art once contemporary? And what are the conceptual tools and interpretive frameworks we need to study contemporary writing in the present age? As literary scholars have noted, one of the defining features of twenty-first century fiction is the return of the novel about time. How, might we ask, are time and space to be negotiated in an era of transnational literary form and planetary ruination? Finally, we wish also to consider the fate of the humanities, and academic labour itself, inside the contemporary University.

The journal invites submissions from postgraduate students and early career scholars that address the theme of the contemporary across the spectrum of Arts and Humanities research.

Topics could include, but are by no means restricted to:

  • Periodisation and the competing temporalities of ‘the contemporary’ across the humanities: Beyond –modernisms, ‘Post-Post’?
  • Methodological shifts in the humanities: Digital Humanities, Medical Humanities, World Literature, Post-Critical.
  • Tone and the contemporary’s affective intensities: Hope and Pessimism, Anxiety and Belonging.
  • The Anthropocene: Environment and Ecocriticism.
  • Mapping the networks and flows of Late Capitalism and Neoliberalism: Towards a contemporary realism?
  • Contemporary Resistances: Digital Commons, the Hacker, Occupy, Black Lives Matter, Indigenous Social Movements.
  • Human, Non-Human, Post-Human: Artificial Intelligence, Prosthetics, and Augmented Reality; Embodiment and Subjectivity.
  • The Future of the Novel: Transnational, Graphic, Documentary, Historical, Science Fiction.
  • The Production, Philosophy, Criticism, and Curating of Contemporary Art.
  • The Relation between Contemporary Art and Art History.

Submission guidelines

We welcome short articles of 3000-5000 words, long articles of 5000-8000 words and critical reviews of books, film, and exhibitions. We also strongly encourage submissions of artwork including visual art; creative writing; podcasts and video footage (up to 10 minutes). We would be happy to discuss ideas for submissions with interested authors prior to the submission deadline.

Please send all completed submissions to mail@dandelionjournal.org by 6th February 2017.

Please also include a 50-word author biography and a 200-300-word abstract alongside your submission. All referencing and style is required in full MHRA format as a condition of publication and submitted articles should be academically rigorous and ready for immediate publication.

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