Screen Studies Group: Screen and Film Research Methods Today – 17 November

Screen Studies Group

Screen and Film Research Methods Today

Saturday 17 November

Venue: Safra Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Strand Campus, King’s College London

Screen and Film Research Methods Today relaunches the Screen Studies Group annual postgraduate training day.  The day has two major goals.  The first is to bring together all new film and screen studies doctoral students in London and the environs. It will enable network building around shared specialisms beyond your home department.  Second, it will provide foundational training in methods that are relatively new to this field and which home institutions often cannot provide.  

 This is a one-day session presenting research methods for all new doctoral students. We will address a variety of topics that now concern Screen and Film Studies such as online research, dating mining, social media; live television; installation work; music videos, gaming, AV/PhDs, Production cultures, media industries, creative practice, and live cinema.  The day include a panel on archives available for under researched or previously excluded cinemas and communities.

The Event is funded by LAHP And CHASE, but all post-graduate students are welcome.

Free. Registration Required: https://www.chase.ac.uk/screen-studies-group/

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Murray Seminars Autumn Term 2018-19

I’m writing with details of this term’s Murray Seminars on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck. These advanced research seminars are open to all, and attract interested members of the public, staff and students from other London colleges and beyond.  They are an opportunity to hear and contribute to cutting-edge research, often at the very early stages of work in progress.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

This term’s seminars are:

16 October, Lisa Monnas

Vestments and Textiles in Hans Memling’s ‘God with Singing and Music-making Angels 

Three large panels in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, painted by Hans Memling in the 1480’s, represent a heavenly scene framed by clouds, which part to reveal the central figure of God attended by sixteen singing and music-making angels. Thye once formed the top of the high altarpiece of the Benedictine Abbey of Santa Maria la Réal in Nájera, in Spain. In the central panel, God is depicted vested as priest and ruler, and the angels in this and in the flanking scenes wear clerical dress. The work has been interpreted as relating to the Good Friday liturgy and the Exaltation of the Cross, but since the panels originally formed the top of an altarpiece whose main subject was the Assumption of the Virgin, this is open to doubt. This paper will re-examine the vestments and textiles in the newly conserved panels, assessing their ‘realism’ and their contribution to the heavenly scene. It will also consider them in the wider context of some of Memling’s other works.

14 November, Jana Gajdosova

Sculpted Genealogies: The Effigies of Bohemian rulers in Prague Cathedral  

With the death of Wenceslas III, the Přemyslid dynasty, which had ruled Bohemia for over four centuries, came to an end. The murder of the young king created chaos in the kingdom for several decades; however, after the marriage of Elizabeth of Přemyslid and John of Luxembourg and the subsequent birth of Charles IV (1316 – 1378), Bohemia reached the height of its political and cultural power in Europe. Charles IV saw himself as a bridge between two Bohemian dynasties – the Přemyslids of the past and the Luxembourgs of his envisioned future. This link was communicated with painted genealogies in at least three of Charles’ castles, and with staged genealogies across Prague. The fascination that Charles had with re-imagining and visualizing his role within the dynastic shift that occurred also found expression in the sculpted genealogies which are the subject of this paper—specifically the effigies of Přemyslids rulers commissioned by Charles IV for Prague Cathedral, which were made to communicate these ideas in sculpture and across real space.

5 December, Marie-Louise Lillywhite 

Blood is Thicker than Water: Artists, Friends and Family Alliances in Seventeenth-Century Venice

How did Venetian artists forge alliances to advance their interests and ensure the continuation of their workshops? Focusing on the painter Palma il Giovane, this paper explores his concerted efforts to continue his family name through strategic marriages, and safeguard his success through advantageous friendships. This study will demonstrate how these potentially positive relationships impacted artistic production in Venice for better, or indeed worse.

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School of Arts Research Student Writing Sessions 2018-19

The School of Arts Writing Sessions will be running again this year, on Mondays and Fridays from 10am to 1pm. All research students and staff are welcome to attend: the sessions are designed to give researchers at all levels some time, space and peer support for focused work on extended writing projects.

You can attend as often as you like: if you think you would like to come at any point, email Sophie Jones to be added to the mailing list. Every Friday, Sophie will send out a sign-up sheet for the following week with details of the room.

More information about the structure of the sessions is available on the group’s web page.

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GRiT: Graduate Research in Theatre 2018-19 programme of events

We would like to invite you to this year’s GRiT: Graduate Research in Theatre events. GRiT is our termly research seminars, featuring presentations by visiting scholars, faculty and graduate students.

Please note down the dates below, and let me know if you have any questions: s.ilter@bbk.ac.uk

  • 28 Nov, 4-5pm (Keynes Library): Prof Dr Alyson Campbell (University of Melbourne)
  • 13 Feb, 4-5pm (Room 106): Daragh Carville (Lecturer in Creative Writing at Bbk, playwright and screenwriter)
  • 20 March, 4-5pm (106): Sasha Dovzhyk (PhD at Bbk – working on the Victorian artist Aubrey Beardsley in early 20th century Russia)
  • 8 May, 4-5pm (106): Hannah Barton (PhD at Bbk – working on internet memes as discourse strategies within a networked culture)

It would be wonderful to see you at these events, and I’d appreciate if you could circulate it amongst your peers.

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Poetry against Slavery: guided tours in October and November 2018

Poetry against Slavery: guided tours in October and November 2018

This guided tour takes place at 12pm and 3pm on Thu 4 October (National Poetry Day), Sun 14 October, Sun 21 October, Thu 25 October, Sun 18 November, Thu 22 November and Sat 24 November. Venue: Museum of London Docklands, No. 1 Warehouse, West India Quay, London E14 4AL. The tour and museum entry are both free. All welcome with no need to book.

The London, Sugar & Slavery gallery at the Museum of London Docklands is a unique resource for exploring London’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade, and for understanding the trade’s present-day legacies. As part of the museum’s Black History Month programme in October, and during the nationwide Being Human Festival in November, Matt Martin (Stuart Hall Research Scholar and PhD student in the Contemporary Poetics Research Centre at Birkbeck) will lead one-hour guided tours of the gallery, showcasing his research into how poetry has galvanised resistance against the oppression of African, Caribbean and Black British people.

From Africa’s rich heritage, through preservation of cultural legacies during slavery, to recent political activism, you will encounter and discuss poems that give voice to objects and images in the museum. Discover how African cultural origins have influenced language and poetry in the Caribbean, how poems inspired anti-slavery action in the Caribbean and the UK, and how later poets have drawn upon this history to oppose continuing racial injustices. The spoken and written word will emerge as powerful ways to build solidarity among and between communities. No advance reading required – all texts will be provided on the day.

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Apply Now: CHASE – ‘Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The Material Cultures of Postcolonial History’ deadline 15 October 2018

INTERNAL COMPETITION FOR CHASE PHD PROGRAMME:

‘Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The Material Cultures of Postcolonial History’

We have 1 place reserved for a Birkbeck PhD student on a fully funded CHASE

doctoral training programme entitled ‘Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The

Material Cultures of Postcolonial History’.

This is a series of six workshops across the year which explore global, transnational and postcolonial pasts by engaging with material collections and texts or objects in museums and exhibition spaces across London, as well as training in creating vlogs and media projects. For full details see below.

Travel costs, participation costs and refreshments are all included and funded by CHASE.

To apply for this programme, please send the following to Kat Hill by Monday October 15th (midnight). (katherine.hill@bbk.ac.uk)

  • 1000word statement explaining why you would be a suitable candidate and how it will enhance your research.
  • Short supporting statement from your supervisor
  • Personal Information required:
    • Name
    • Email
    • Programme of Study
    • Department
    • Year of PhD
    • Title/Area of Research
    • Supervisor

Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The Material Cultures of Postcolonial

History

Kat Hill and Rebecca Darley (History, Classics and Archaeology – Birkbeck)

Suzanna Ivanic (Kent)

Luke Lavan (Kent)

Liz James (Sussex)

A series of six workshops across the year which explore global, transnational and postcolonial pasts by engaging with material collections and texts or objects in museums and exhibition spaces across London. The journeys of objects or the changing shape and use of spaces can offer a powerful means of unpicking, understanding and then conveying meaningfully and compellingly to a range of audiences the processes and legacies of empires. Encountering the objects and spaces proposed in these workshops emphasizes not only the intellectual perspectives of post-colonial theory upon the past, but also brings to light in the most concrete terms those shadows of empire in the present that post-colonial theory was developed to expose and challenge.

These workshops will include one international conference, four object-based sessions making use of London’s unparalleled collections, and two sessions dedicated to the processes of translating research into different arenas. You will have the chance to examine a range of material and objects in dedicated study sessions with curators and experts, and over the course of the series, you will produce a video, blogpost or other public-facing reflection, drawing on your own research and the materials in these workshops. You will receive training from the Derek Jarman Lab, Birkbeck’s media department, on how to produce an effective media project and have the opportunity to contribute to a podcast with a top broadcaster, as well as present your ideas on the sessions to a non-academic audience.

The focus in all of the workshops will, therefore, be on the complex material histories of empires, as vehicles for migration, trade, translation and the imposition of political authority, and simultaneously on developing a constant awareness of the sub-structures of knowledge creation that underpin any approach to the past. They will combine to give you fresh ways to think with objects and to challenge categories and ideologies of colonialism, not only as they were historically constructed, but also as they continue to shape the world today.

Places are limited. Registration will be open soon via the CHASE website.

For any questions please contact Kat Hill (katherine.hill@bbk.ac.uk) or Rebecca Darley (r.darley@bbk.ac.uk)

What will you get from these sessions?

  • Engage with materiality and object-based history
  • Engage with diachronic global and transnational histories
  • Think about place and space as historical concepts
  • Develop presentation and public engagement skills
  • Broaden knowledge of heritage spaces and public museums
  • Network with other researchers, senior scholars and other stakeholders

What’s included?

  • All the sessions, time and resources
  • Lunch and refreshments for each day
  • Travel to and from the workshops
  • Overnight accommodation if coming outside London for session 1 (Conference and Mithraeum)
  • Payment for 2 students to tweet and blog about the Late Antique Archaeology conference

 Indicative Programme (all are full day events)

Workshop 1: November 30 and December 1 2018: Tour of the Mithraeum and Archaeology Conference

  • Opportunity to attend the Late Antique Archaeology (this is not compulsory)
  • Tour of the Mithraeum site
  • Discussion with a researcher who has worked with the Mithraeum of the moveable objects found within the site and the decision to house these in the Museum of London
  • Panel discussion on the role of Bloomberg in the conservation and future of the Mithraeum site

Workshop 2: January 2019: Training with the Derek Jarman Lab

  • Training session on vlogs, blogs and media

 Workshop 3: February 2019: The British Library

  • Tour of the map room of the British Library
  • Discussion with a researcher working on the British Library collections and on maps of the Middle East in particular
  • Opportunity to see and spend time examining, collectively and in small groups, a sequence of maps showing the Middle East and to discuss their changing representations of this space

Workshop 4: March 2019: The British Museum

  • Tour of the Waddesdon Bequest, the Renaissance treasures (and some fakes) collected by Baron Rothschild
  • Discussion with a researcher working on the Renaissance collections at the British Museum about the origin and nature of this collection, in relation to the wider Renaissance holdings of the museum
  • Opportunity to see and spend time examining, collectively and in small groups, a selection of objects in the Waddesdon Bequest, chosen to reflect contested, disruptive or hidden histories of colonialism.

                                                                      

Workshop 5: May 2019: The V and A

  • Tour of the photographic archive of the V&A examining material from the nineteenth century, such as Creswell photographs of Syria, Palestine, and Cairo, albums of missions and expeditions to Pacific Islands, and records of hierarchies in India
  • Discussion with a researcher working on the digitization of the photographic archive
  • Opportunity to see and spend time examining, collectively and in small groups, images from the Tripe collection. To investigate the unique nature of photographs as documentary sources constructed out of intentional and unintentional preserved elements, and the value of this in developing new narratives of past spaces.

Workshop 6: June 2019: Westminster Kingsway College

  • presentation of blogpost/video-post (to a group of students from Westminster Kingsway College, a sixth-form college in partnership with Birkbeck and a panel discussion to include Nigel Warburton (Philosophy Bites and AEON magazine founder) and Dr. Charlotte Joy (lecturer in anthropology at Goldsmiths and curator of the Horniman Museum)

 

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Senate House: Publishing Queer / Queer Publishing 11 October 2018

Following the ‘Queer Between the Covers’ season earlier this year, Senate House Library is hosting a one-day conference on October 11th 2018 entitled ‘Publishing Queer / Queer Publishing’.

Papers will be presented exploring queer publishing from the 19th century onward, encompassing canonical authors, fan fiction and artistic interventions.

For a full list of papers, speakers, and how to book see here https://bit.ly/2N4zC9G

Lunch will be provided.

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Volunteer Opportunity: London Science Fiction Conference 14/15 September 2018

The London Science Fiction Research Community (LSFRC), run by fellow research students Aren Roukema and Rhodri Davies, is in need of people (or self-identifing AIs) to assist with its 2018 conference, “Sublime Cognition: Science Fiction and Metaphysics”.

Interested parties would be able to help in a number of different areas, including setup, welcome and registration, refreshments, technical assistance and chairing of panels (if suitable research experience). This opportunity would be particularly valuable for students looking to gain conference organisation experience and make new contacts in science fiction studies and related fields. Free admission will be provided.

“Sublime Cognition” will take place 14–15 September at Gordon Square. The conference will feature keynotes from Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck) and Helen de Cruz (Oxford Brookes), as well as a roundtable with SF authors Justina Robson, Jeff Noon, and Fiona Moore, and panel presentations from more than 30 speakers.

Please contact Aren Roukema or Rhodri Davies at lsfrcmail@gmail.com.”

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From Field to Page: Core Skills in the Medical Humanities 5 July and 8 November 2018

From Field to Page: Core Skills in the Medical Humanities 

CHASE Cohort Training Days

July 5th & November 8th 2018

Keynes Library

School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Medical humanities continues to emerge as a live and transforming field of enquiry.  The core work of this field seeks to explore and critique biomedical science and its histories through the various critical frameworks of the humanities disciplines.  Medical humanities research presents scholars with the particular challenges of transdisciplinary research undertaken across the radically different domains of medicine and the humanities’ academic disciplines.  Across the CHASE institutions there is a diverse cohort of medical humanities doctoral researchers that incorporates students from both clinical and non-clinical, humanities backgrounds. As such the cohort represents a broad range of skills-sets, work, academic and training experiences, and previous exposure to the critical methods central to the humanities disciplines. Clinicians come into the field of research with substantial situated knowledge of the real-life settings and practices of medicine and surgery but often with the need to acquire, through training the requisite skills of critical thinking and writing.  Conversely, non-clinicians and humanities’ scholars are much better versed in critical practice and inquiry, but lack the grounded, lived experience of clinical practice. The range of research projects undertaken in the field is markedly diverse, ranging from practice-led (examining the nature of clinical practice), to practice-based (using clinical practice as research), to purely analytic (discursive analysis) modes of inquiry but all undertake to situate medicine, disease, patient experience, clinical practice and medical education within socio-cultural and/or historical contexts in such a way that critical analysis and discursive understandings may be produced. The aims of medical humanities theses may, or may not, have the avowed intention of contributing to the practical fields of clinical practice, delivery of healthcare or medical education. All medical humanities theses must adhere to the core methodologies and practices of the humanities disciplines and this means that critical thinking and writing skills are key requirements of the medical humanities doctorate.

The CHASE Consortium will deliver two training days, which map the core skills required of medical humanities doctoral research and support doctoral researchers as they undertake their projects.

Registration for both days is free and open to all PhD students at CHASE institutions.

There are 10 travel bursaries available for students without CHASE funding, these will be awarded on a first come, first served basis.

To register, please contact Jo Winning, j.winning@bbk.ac.uk by 25th June 2018

Programme

Day 1, July 5tth 2018

10.15-10.30am:  Coffee and Registration

10.30-11.15am:  Keynote Lecture 1: Mapping the field (Jo Winning, Birkbeck)

11.15am-12.30pm:  The challenges of transdisciplinarity and the problems of language (Birkbeck/Wellcome ISSF Medical Humanities Fellows)

12.30-1.30pm:  Lunch

13.30-2.30pm:  Open Space to discuss the morning sessions

2.30-3.45pm:  Working with stakeholders: public engagement and impact (Ross Macfarlane, Wellcome; Deborah Padfield, St George’s Medical School; Wendy Earle, Birkbeck Impact Officer)

3.45pm-4pm:  Coffee

4-5.15pm:  Breakout group sessions to discuss intersections of the sessions with individual research projects

5.30pm:  Happy 70th Birthday NHS, Drinks Reception, followed by evening tour of the Wellcome Collection

 

Day 2, November 8th 2018

10.15-10.30am:  Coffee and Registration

10.30-11.15am:  Keynote Lecture 2: From academy to clinic, and back again (tbc)

11.15am-12.30pm:  Medical Humanities and Ethics (tbc)

12.30-1.30pm:  Lunch

13.30-2.30pm:  Open Space to discuss the morning sessions

2.30-3.45pm:  Putting theory into practice: medical humanities as practice-based research (tbc)

3.45pm-4pm:  Coffee

4-5.15pm:  Breakout group sessions to discuss intersections of the sessions with individual research projects

5.30pm:  Panel discussion and Drinks Reception, hosted by Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities

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CFP: DISTRACTION Birkbeck Institute for Social Research Graduate Conference – deadline 7 May 2018

The Call for Papers for the BISR annual graduate conference has been extended! The theme this year is DISTRACTION.

This conference aims to involve PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines and institutions. It is funded by the Birkbeck Institutes of Social ResearchGender and Sexuality, and Humanities

Dates: 8-9 June 2018

NEW DEADLINE: 7th May 2018. Please send 200 word abstracts and 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk. If you are also interested in taking part in the running of the event such as chairing a panel, please get in touch via this email.

We are delighted to confirm Prof. Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford) and Dr. Sophie Jones (Birkbeck, English) as our keynote speakers.

 

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/fellows-and-academic-staff/d/carolin-duttlinger

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/sophie-jones

 

Full details: http://bit.ly/2hCcxuq

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