Symposium: Conversations on Care and/in the Community – 6 June 2019

Conversations on Care and/in the Community

 

Keynes Library, 6th June 2019, 12.30-6.30pm

Experiences and practices of care have changed dramatically in the past three decades. Since the passing of the NHS and Community Care Act (1990), healthcare, social care and short-term psychiatric care have been increasingly decentralised and delivered ‘in the community’. This shift has been both practical and discursive: altering the pathways by which care is accessed and the sites in which it is received; and changing perceptions surrounding the role of those receiving care in wider society. In the case of mental healthcare for example, it has led us to move from the ‘mental patient’ to the ‘service user’ as labels that define the relationship between persons receiving care and those providing it.

Thirty years on, community care continues to be a fraught subject. On the one hand, it has been seen as having a democratizing influence, opening up the possibility for greater patient choice, and of integrating patients’ and service-users’ voices into care provision. On the other, it continues to be viewed as a chaotic cost-cutting exercise which leaves vulnerable people to fall through the cracks.

‘Conversations on Care and/in the Community’ symposium invites researchers to engage in a series of conversations surrounding these new social and spatial conditions of care in the twenty-first century.

Register for a free space here: http://bit.ly/careandincommunity

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MIROnline Workshop – 25 May 2019: Fran Lock and Simon Coltman

MIROnline’s next workshop, poetry and meditation with Fran Lock and Simon Coltman, takes place on Saturday, May 25th. This is a free event but places are limited. You can book your place on our Eventbrite page:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/poetry-and-meditation-with-fran-lock-and-simon-coltman-tickets-60940146619

Exploring ways to improve focus, access new images and ideas, and turn those ideas into poetry, this afternoon will provide you with the tools you need to use meditation and free writing in your own poetic pursuits. Writing and editing poems will also be of great use to prose writers due to the focus on the lyric nature of language.

The workshop will begin with a mindfulness meditation session and will involve shorter and more focused mediation throughout the afternoon. There will be a series of exercises aimed at generating, structuring and editing poems. Editing meditations will provide the opportunity to view your writing as a reader would.

The afternoon will culminate in a feedback session facilitated by Fran and Melanie. All participants will be offered the opportunity for more detailed feedback via email after the session. Work produced may also be considered for publication on our website or performance at one of our live events.

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In-Jokes and outsiders: Considering internet memes as displaced performances’: GRiT (Graduate Research in Theatre) event. 8 May 2019

All are welcome to attend this year’s fourth and final GRiT (Graduate Research in Theatre) event. 

Film, Media and Cultural Studies doctoral student Hannah Barton’s talk ‘In-Jokes and outsiders: Considering internet memes as displaced performances’ will take place on Wednesday, 8 May  (4-5 pm) in Room 106 (43 Gordon Square). We look forward to seeing you there!

In-Jokes and outsiders: Considering internet memes as displaced performances’:

From LOLcats to Distracted Boyfriends, Galaxy Brain to SpongeBob, internet memes have been described as the lingua franca of social media. Commonly conceptualised as ephemeral visual (and sometimes aural) artefacts, memes tend to be ‘read’ in terms of form and content. However, memes are not simply proliferated artefacts; they are highly contextual and associative communicative events; shared as performances between creators and audiences, and mediated by technologies. As social and technological contexts iterate, so do the practices of meme production. Put otherwise, the experience of creating or encountering a meme can be markedly different from one week to the next. This dynamism poses interesting challenges for researchers. Can internet memes be comprehensively theorised once they become displaced from the technosocial conditions in which they were created? This seminar will discuss these points, and suggest that theoretical positions drawn from performance studies provide strategies for acknowledging – and where possible capturing – the technosocial context in which a meme was created and proliferated.

Hannah Barton is a doctoral student in Birkbeck’s Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies, where she is researching the cultural history of internet memes. She is also Digital Project Manager at Tate, and an occasional writer.

 

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Films with a Mission: Medical Films from the Catholic Mission Archives – 11 May 2019

Films with a Mission

Medical Films from the Catholic Mission Archives

1930s-1960s 

Saturday 11 May 2019, 1.00pm  – 5.00pm.

Birkbeck Institute of the Moving Image

Gordon Square Cinema

43 Gordon Square

London WC1H 0PD 

Films with a Mission, for its third screening event, will extend its focus this year to films on medical subjects from the Catholic missionary archives. The films were widely circulated and exhibited on their release and over subsequent decades, not only in Ireland and Britain, but also across the US. The afternoon symposium will explore some of the key issues and questions in historically assessing missionary film archives. It will discuss how we can gain new perspectives in understanding the motivations, reach and transnational impact of these productions on local and global audiences.

Screening rarely shown films from the Irish Film Institute (IFI) and the British Empire and Commonwealth collection at Bristol Museums, the symposium will discuss how Catholic medical orders used film to promote medical research and hospital practices. These films are part of a broader emergence of educational film at the time. They are significant for their involvement of filmmakers trained in documentary film in Britain during the 1930s and 1940s.

Amongst the films shown will be:

Visitation: the Story of the Medical Missionaries of Mary (Andrew Buchanan, 1947, 60 mins) about the medical work of a women’s religious order: the Medical Missionaries of Mary, at their mission in Nigeria, Africa;

Aran of the Saints (London Catholic Film Society, 1930s, 21 mins) made on the island of Aran, Ireland, by the Missionary Sisters of the Divine Motherhood, and produced by the London Catholic Film Society, after the release of Robert Flaherty’s film Man of Aran (1934);

Ecce Ancilla Domini  (FMDM,1950s; 54 mins) a recruitment film about the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Divine Motherhood (FMDM), Ladywell, Surrey, at their medical and educational missions in Northern and S. Rhodesia (Zambia, Zimbabwe), Nigeria, Singapore and Malaysia.

Speakers include: Dr. Emma Sandon, film historian and Dr. Carmen Mangion, historian of women religious, at Birkbeck, and they are joined by independent researcher, Edel Robinson, who catalogued the films in the IFI archive, and Isabelle Smyth, Writer in Residence, Medical Missionaries of Mary.

This event is run in collaboration with the Christian Missions in Global History seminar group, Institute of Historical Research, University of London; and supported by the Birkbeck Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund.

To book on Eventbrite please follow the link:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/films-with-a-mission-tickets-60371587042

The full timetable and programme of screenings and presentations for the afternoon will be released shortly.

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Napoleon Harlequin: Theatre and the Battle for Legitimacy, 1814-15 – 10 June 2019

Lecture by Professor Katherine Astbury

 Napoleon Harlequin:

Theatre and the Battle for Legitimacy, 1814-15

 6 -7.30pm, Monday 10 June 2019

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square. WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a forthcoming lecture by Kate Astbury, Professor of French Studies, University of Warwick.

After the allies entered Paris at the end of March 1814, the city witnessed a flood of pamphlets and prints denouncing Napoleon as ‘tyrant’, ‘monster’, ‘assassin’ and ‘comedian’. This final ‘crime’ might, at first sight, seem somewhat out of place but the battle for legitimacy that was taking place hinged on who had the greater claim to rule France, Napoleon or Louis XVIII. To accuse Napoleon of being a charlatan and an actor merely playing a part was to undermine his right to reign and it thus becomes a repeated element of royalist attacks on the person of the Emperor.  It would however, also be a weapon Napoleon’s supporters could turn to their advantage and this paper will outline the ways in which theatrical metaphor was used by both sides in 1814-15.

The lecture will be followed by questions, and drinks.

All are very welcome!

For further information, please contact Dr Ann Lewis: a.lewis@bbk.ac.uk

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Thinking (about) Automata in Descartes, Shaftesbury, and Diderot – 20 May 2019

Lecture by Dr. James Fowler

Thinking (about) Automata in Descartes, Shaftesbury, and Diderot

6 -7.30pm, Monday 20 May 2019

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square. WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a forthcoming lecture by James Fowler, Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Kent.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, discussions of the soul in the secular sphere involved thinking about automata, and whether they might think. Breaking with Aristotle, Descartes uses the cultural phenomenon of automates (such as those he viewed at Saint-Germain-en-Laye) to suggest that, quite simply, all non-human animals are ‘bêtes-machines’. Shaftesbury is strongly opposed to this: refuting Descartes and Malebranche, he argues that all animals – including humans – should only be viewed as ‘clockwork’ when they are seized by fits. By contrast, Diderot (an admirer of Vaucanson) argues, in support of materialism, that humans can usefully be imagined as animal-machines – or indeed as living statues. This tendency in Diderot can be traced in his early (1747) translation of Shaftesbury, in which the automaton, as ‘automate’, is introduced where it least belongs: in the English Earl’s thought experiment concerning a ‘solitary creature’.

 

All are very welcome! Please note: this event is part of Birkbeck Arts Week 2019.

To reserve your free place, and to see the full programme of events, please go to:

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/annual-events/arts-week/arts-week-2019

 

For further information, please contact Dr Ann Lewis: a.lewis@bbk.ac.uk

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Corkscrew Podcasting Lecture – 30 May 2019

Corkscrew Podcasting Lecture
Led by Dr. Dario Llinares (d.llinares@brighton.ac.uk)
Thursday 30 May 2019, 12-13.15pm
Location: GORB03

12:00 PUBLIC LECTURE by Dr. Dario Llinares: Podcasting Praxis: Questions of Research and Knowledge through Aural Mediation.

Bio: Dario Llinares is Principal Lecturer in Contemporary Screen Media at the University of Brighton, UK. His current research focuses on the status and practice of cinema-going in the digital age, and on podcasting as a practice-research method. He is co-editor of Podcasting: New Aural Cultures and Digital Media (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) and co-founder and co-host of the very popular and esteemed Cinematologists podcast.

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Screening and Symposium about the film 120 BPM – 10 May 2019

Screening and Symposium about the film 120 BPM

10 May 2019 – 6.00 – 9.00pm

The screening takes place at Queen Mary, University of London on Friday the 10th of May. It will be followed by a roundtable with a fantastic lineup of speakers and a wine reception. See speaker details below.

– Ben Walters (a writer who blogs about moving-image, queer and DIY cultures @not_television & recently completed a PhD on nightlife collective Duckie at Queen Mary)
-Ray Malone (co-founder of the NHS Anti-Swindle Team, the founder of The Fallout Club and ACT UP activist)
-Lo Marshall (who works with the UCL Urban Laboratory on a project researching LGBTQI nightlife spaces in London from 1986 until the present).

The symposium will take place at King’s College, London on Saturday the 11th of May and will focus on diverse and interdisciplinary responses to 120 BPM, including panels on ‘Queer Histories / Activisms’, ‘Colour’, ‘Dance, Sound, Rhythm, Community Building’, ‘Digital Technologies and Virtual Reality’ and ‘Death, Dust, & Plastics’ and a keynote by Dr Fiona Johnstone, whose publication AIDS & Representation: Portraits and Self-Portraits During the AIDS Crisis in America is forthcoming in 2019.

FILM SCREENING:

Friday, May 10th

6.00 – 9.00pm at the Hitchcock Cinema, ArtsOne, Queen Mary, University of London.

FREE, BOOK HERE:   https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/120-bpm-film-screening-and-panel-tickets-59883719818?aff=erelconmlt

SYMPOSIUM: 

Saturday, May 11th
10.30-5 at the Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Kings College London
FREE, BOOK HERE:   https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/120-bpm-symposium-tickets-59883604473

We are extremely grateful for the support of our sponsors the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies (BAFTSS), The Society for French Studies (SFS) and The Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (ASMCF).

To find out more about the conference please go to 120BPMsymposium.wordpress.com or our twitter feed @120BPMSymposium.

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Other possible stories. Rethinking the collections of the Museo de Arte de Lima – 3 May 2019

The Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies and the Centre for Museum Cultures cordially invite you to the talk:

Other possible stories. Rethinking the collections of the Museo de Arte de Lima

Natalia Maljuf

Friday, 3 May, 2019

5PM-7PM

GOR 106, 43 Gordon Square

School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

This presentation attempts to account for the work carried out by a group of curators and experts at the Museo de Arte de Lima over the past two decades. It explores the challenges of incorporating historical and contemporary objects within a panoramic survey collection that spans cultural production in the Andean region from the pre-Columbian period to the present. This effort has confronted the museum with notions of art, time and place that establish oppositions between crucial categories of museological classification: high and popular culture, art and craft, history and ethnography, tradition and modernity, the local and the global. These issues are discussed through examples of specific collecting and research projects related to forms of cultural production traditionally excluded from the museum’s narratives.

Natalia Majluf, currently Simón Bolívar Chair at the University of Cambridge, 2018-2019, is an art historian who works on the long nineteenth century in Latin America, from the era of Independence to the early twentieth century. As Head Curator and Director of the Museo de Arte de Lima, between 1995 and 2018 she oversaw the renovation of the historic building that houses the museum and was responsible for enriching and broadening the scope of the collections. She has held fellowships from the Getty Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, D.C. She is editor, among others, of Los incas, reyes del Perú (2005), Luis Montero’s The funerals of Atahualpa (2011), José Gil de Castro, pintor de libertadores (2014) and has co-authored Tipos del Perú. La Lima criolla de Pancho Fierro (2008), Fernando Bryce. Drawing Modern History (2011), Sabogal (2013) and Chambi (2015), among other books and exhibition catalogues.

All welcome, attendance free but booking here necessary.

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New Approaches to Writing History – 9 May 2019

New Approaches to Writing History: A panel discussion with Bart Van Es, Sarah Knott, and Barbara Taylor,  jointly hosted by the IHR and the Raphael Samuel History Centre.

Thursday 9th May 2019, 6.30 – 8.00pm

Clore Lecture Theatre, Clore Management Centre, Birkbeck College, London WC1E 7JL

Reception to follow

 

Booking essential; book here (www.history.ac.uk/events/event/19545)

 

Join Costa Book winner, Bart Van Es, and the feminist and historian, Sarah Knott, to discuss new approaches to writing history.

Once characterized by its authorial distance and dispassion, history is open to ever-greater experiment as a written form. The rise of first-person narration, the merging of history with memoir, the appeal of ‘non-fiction fiction’, and the historian’s place as agent of research, or even subject within the past, are all reshaping how academic history is being written, read and enjoyed.

In this event we’ll discuss the reasons for, and outcomes of, this greater fluidity of form. How do we explain a new readiness to experiment; what does a fusing of genres mean for historical values; can form shape method and understanding of the past; and where next for experimental history writing? Commenting on these topics are three highly successful practitioners of innovative history.

Bart Van Es is professor of English Literature at Oxford University. His latest book, The Cut Out Girl: A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found (Penguin), won the 2018 Costa Book award earlier this year. Part memoir of friendship, part family history, The Cut Out Girl opens into a detailed study of the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands and the networks that supported the hiding of Jewish children. To the Evening Standard this is ‘a masterpiece of history and memoir’.

Sarah Knott is associate professor in history at Indiana University and the author of Mother. An Unconventional History, published by Penguin in March 2019. The study of mothering from the seventeenth to the late twentieth century, Mother is an ‘unconventional history’ in its use of first-person as the means to undertake historical research, and in its piecing together of past mothering from anecdotal fragments born of interruptions.

They’re joined by Barbara Taylor (QMUL) who will lead the conversation with Bart and Sarah. Barbara is professor of humanities at Queen Mary, University of London, and the author of The Last Asylum. A Memoir of Madness in our Times (Penguin, 2014).

 

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