CFP: Eight Early Modern Symposium – The Courtauld Institute deadline 31 August 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – SUBMIT BY 31 AUGUST 2018

In recent years, a renewed interest in Early Modern rituals, festivals, and performances has prompted a reconsideration of ceremonious processions with a particular focus on their impact on social, cultural, artistic and political structures and practices. Simultaneously, scholars have increasingly acknowledged the mobility of Early Modern artists across geographical, religious and cultural borders. Although processions were witnessed by natives and visitors alike and were therefore prime instances of cross-cultural encounters, their depictions by artists both local and foreign remain a lesser-studied body of visual material. This symposium proposes to explore the visual representations of processions that took place within cross-cultural encounters both within and outside of Europe.

A procession was an act of movement that was particularly charged with meaning; an ambulatory mode of celebration, it had a global resonance in the Early Modern period. Processionals impressed foreign dignitaries, established modes of rule, communicated traditions and negotiated power balances and were highly sensory occasions – as such they lent themselves readily to visual representation and were enthusiastically recorded in literature. Pageantries, military processions and Joyous Entries (Blijde Inkomsten) were recorded in a variety of media, as exemplified by the festival books celebrating the ephemeral constructions orchestrated for Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand’s arrival in Antwerp (1635) or the eighteenth-century paintings depicting Venice’s dazzling boat parades in honour of foreign dignitaries. Furthermore, ceremonial processions conceived for births, weddings, circumcision feasts and funerals occasioned visual representations such as the colourful Mughal miniature Wedding Procession of Dara Shikoh in presence of Shah Jahan (1740). In addition, the notion of procession can be expanded to encompass various expressions of mobility that could be understood and were often depicted as a procession. Both Jan van Scorel’s frieze-like painting of the knightly brotherhood commemorating their Holy Land pilgrimage (c. 1530) and the depiction of ambassadors travelling with their retinue to foreign courts and cities can be perceived as a form of procession. Thus, the structure of a procession was increasingly adopted in the Early Modern period to depict moments of exchange and motion propelled by the quest for knowledge, as much as diplomatic concerns and religious piety. Well-known examples include The Voyage to Calicuttapestry series (1504) as well as the highly detailed printed frieze of a merchant endeavour by Hans Burgkmair (The King of Cochin, 1508).

We welcome proposals for papers that engage with processions in the Early Modern period (c. 1500-1800) in the context of cross-cultural encounters, with the locations of cross-cultural interaction defined here as both inter or extra-European and beyond the “East meets West” dynamic. Participants are invited to explore artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary divides, and to examine drawings, prints, alba amicorum, painting, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture, and the intersections between them. Contributions from other disciplines, such as the history of science and conservation, are welcome. We invite 20-minute papers that explore, but are not limited to, the following questions:

  • How is the format of the procession used to structure visual representations of Early Modern ceremonial occasions and cultural difference?
  • How were processions perceived visually both by local and foreign artists?
  • Moreover, what audiences were interested in these visual representations and what scope did such a broad and diverse range of visual material serve? It is widely acknowledged, for instance, that Festival Books were not only designed for the audience of the spectacle, but also for armchair readers who could thus experience the procession as if they had been present.
  • In what way does the visual representation of a procession signify a means of negotiating between one’s own identity, heritage and outlook whilst in dialogue with another culture?
  • How did diplomatic encounters encourage the production of procession scenes both during and after the diplomatic mission, such as the depiction of gift-giving ceremonies? We strongly encourage speakers to also consider less conventional modes of processions. Could, for instance, the sequential depiction of costumes in costume albums also be interpreted as a procession of some sorts?
  • Through which visual strategies and spatial arrangements did the ephemeral decorations and arches erected on the occasion of glorious entries orchestrate a procession through the urban space, or thematise the idea of cross-cultural encounter?
  • What are the effects (both ephemeral and lasting) of these processions that sometimes involve the construction of specific architectural constructions and temporary settings (e.g. the Field of the Cloth of Gold, 1520)?

The Early Modern Symposium offers an opportunity for research students from universities both in the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. We invite proposals from graduate students, early career researchers, conservators, and curators. Talks that draw upon technical analysis and other theoretical approaches are equally welcome.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a short biography by 31 August 2018 to:

talitha.schepers@courtauld.ac.uk and alice.zamboni@courtauld.ac.uk

The aim of this postgraduate symposium is to provide a platform for Early Career Researchers and postgraduate students to share their research with peers. We may be able to provide a subsidy for travel and accommodation costs, but please be aware that this may not cover all of your expenses. We prioritise candidates from the UK and Europe. We will notify successful applicants by Monday 10 September 2018.

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CFP Elegy: New Approaches – Deadline for Abstracts: 3 August 2018

Elegy: New Approaches

Department of English Studies and the Centre for Poetry and Poetics

Durham University, September 14, 2018

Extended Deadline for Abstracts: 3 August 2018

Keynote Speaker: Professor Stephen Regan

Elegy, as Jahan Ramanzani observes, is the ‘mimesis of mourning’. It is the poetic form and distillation of our common response to loss, meeting the need for consolation and renewal in the face of death. It fulfils several cathartic requirements: the expression of grief, anger, and disbelief; the idealisation of what is lost; and the preservation of its memory. Elegy’s catalyst can emerge as the death of a loved one or exemplary figure (often a fellow poet, as in Alfred Tennyson’s ‘In Memoriam’), the loss of love itself, or the loss of values that have receded from the cultural consciousness.

Traditionally considered as a mode of consolation and reassurance, in modernity these tendencies have sometimes been questioned and rejected. How can the elegy function effectively, for example, in the era of police brutality and Black Lives Matter, or in the aftermath of the recent mass shootings at US high schools? Conversely, can elegy as a genre of response open up new ways of thinking about socio-political issues – can the homoerotics of certain Roman love elegies, for instance, help us explore the grief reaction to the AIDS crisis of the 1980s? For this conference, we seek papers that investigate new approaches to the elegy in its many forms, be it the elegies of the Civil Rights Movement, responses to political violence (such as the hauntingly beautiful poems of Seamus Heaney and Michael Longley), elegies of Diaspora, or the prominent elegies in the English tradition. We also welcome papers that consider the elegiac response as something that exceeds the poetic lyric: a diary entry of Woolf’s, for example, deliberates whether ‘elegy’ should supplant ‘novel’ when describing works such as To the Lighthouse, and traditions of ritual mourning such as keening can be approached as intersections of social and literary conventions. Our aim is to foreground these ‘texts’ as elegiac in their own right and to showcase recent research in this area.

This conference is envisioned as a forum for reflection on the current state of research on elegy and on potentially fruitful directions for future exploration. The organisers are especially keen to elicit proposals pertaining to new and emergent areas of interest, and/or which take an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. We also welcome proposals relating to elegies outside of the Anglophone tradition, although for the purpose of this conference all presentations must be delivered in English.

We invite proposals for 20 minute papers on the theme of elegy and the elegiac, broadly considered. Please send a 250 word abstract and a mini-biography (50-100 words) to Dr Laura McKenzie at elegy2018@gmail.com by 3 August 2018. For further details visit the conference website at https://bit.ly/2IMY5ya.

 

Contact Info: 

Dr Laura McKenzie

Department of English Studies

Durham University

 

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CFP: Frankenstein Unbound – deadline Monday 18th June 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Arts University Bournemouth

Frankenstein Unbound: An Interdisciplinary Conference Exploring Mary Shelley and Gothic Legacies

Dates: Wednesday 31 October and Thursday 1 November 2018

Venues: Conference – St Peter’s Church, Bournemouth

Keynote Speakers:

Sir Christopher Frayling, Chancellor, Arts University Bournemouth

Professor Elaine Graham, University of Chester

Professor Sir Peter Cook, CRAB Studios (TBC)

In 1849, Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley’s heart were brought to the graveyard of St. Peter’s Church in Bournemouth, where they were buried with the remains of Mary Shelley’s parents Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin.

In 2018, Arts University Bournemouth and St. Peter’s Church, in association with Bournemouth University, celebrate the bicentenary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s most famous work Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (1818) as part of the Shelley Frankenstein Festival. The academic conference, located at this unique venue, will offer new and re-situated perspectives on Mary Shelley and her writings, her family and circle, and her most famous work.  We are pleased to acknowledge colleagues at Bournemouth University for their organisational support.

We invite papers and presentations themed around, but not limited to, the following:

  • Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, and the Romantics
  • Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley
  • Mary Shelley beyond Frankenstein
  • The Shelley family: history and legacy
  • Monstrous Romantics
  • Frankenstein and the sea
  • Theology and Frankenstein
  • Frankenstein and philosophy
  • Frankenstein at home and abroad
  • Adaptations and afterlives
  • Frankenstein and medical humanities
  • The abject and the sublime
  • Frankenstein and emotion
  • Guilt and crime in Frankenstein
  • Interpretations of Frankenstein in the creative industries (Film, Art, Theatre, Dance, Writing etc)
  • Mary Shelley and Gothic legacies
  • Gothic architecture
  • The Gothic imagination

We welcome proposals for themed panel sessions (maximum three papers), individual twenty-minute presentations, or creative submissions from practitioners and scholars of all fields. We particularly encourage submissions from post-graduate students and Early Career Researchers. Please submit an abstract (300 words) and short biography (100 words) to frankensteinunboundconference@gmail.com by Monday 18th June 2018.

For more information and updates visit our website: https://frankensteinunbound.wordpress.com/

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CFP: Symposium of Sound, Durham University – Deadline 14 June 2018

Call for Papers

‘The rest is silence’

Symposium of Sound

Durham University

3rd-4th September 2018

Keynote speakers and performers:

Professor Helen Abbott, Department of Modern Languages, University of Birmingham

Dr Edward Allen, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Aurélia Lassaque, bilingual poet and singer in French and Occitan

The Symposium of Sound is a two-day conference supported by Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership. We invite abstracts for papers of twenty minutes in length on the theme of ‘sound’: its creation, imitation, and its relationship with language. Proposals may range across fields of study, with interdisciplinary approaches particularly welcome in areas such as literature, music, performance and creative practice, modern languages, and linguistics. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Utterance, verbal and non-verbal
  • Metre, rhythm, and rhyme
  • Timbre and voicing
  • Pitch and tone
  • Echo and imitation
  • Song and lyric in performance and on the page
  • Phonetics and phonology
  • Soundscapes and sounds in place
  • Orality and aurality
  • Dialect and vernacularity
  • Gossip, rumour and bruit
  • Noise
  • Sound media (including radio and film)
  • Repetition
  • Silence and the absence of sound

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words and a short biography to symposiumofsound2018@gmail.com by 14th June 2018.

You can find further information on our conference website.

Keep up to date with the latest conference news by following us on Twitter on @sound_symposium and liking us on Facebook.

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Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018/19 – deadline 18 June 2018

Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19

Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) is currently planning its programme of events for 2018-19.

We welcome proposals from researchers and students working in any discipline or field across the Schools of Arts, Law, SSHP, and Science.

We are very happy to work in collaboration with research centres and institutes at Birkbeck or at other institutions.

All our events take place in the Birkbeck Cinema, typically on Friday evenings 6-9pm and Saturdays 10-5pm.

We can show films in 16mm and 35mm, as well as a variety of digital formats.

We are especially keen to foreground film and other moving image material that is rarely screened in public.

If you would like to propose an idea for an event, please use the following form:

BIMI Call for proposals 2018-19 and send it to bimi@bbk.ac.uk – the deadline for submission is the 18th of June.

Looking forward to hearing about your ideas.

Michael Temple, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Essay Film Festival

Matthew Barrington, interim BIMI Manager

Sign up to our newsletter: bimi@bbk.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Birkbeck_BIMI

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Birkbeck-Institute-for-the-Moving-Image-542278625939273/

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CFP Action: Arrest – Performance, protest, and the law deadline 11 June 2018

Action: Arrest 

Performance, protest, and the law

A one-day symposium

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Doyle (University of California, Riverside)

Join us in exploring the role of action and arrest in protest, law, and performance. Taking place during the year of the Suffragette centenary, the fifty-year anniversary of the Paris ‘68 uprisings, and a period of burgeoning civil unrest and political uncertainty in the UK and worldwide, Action: Arrest looks to assess and reassess the relationship between performance, protest, and the law. Inspired by their compelling dualities, the symposium aims to open up a new set of questions that may further complicate the relationship between these terms.

Recent and ongoing people-led political movements – for example, the March for Our Lives against current US gun laws, Yarl’s Wood #HungerForFreedom hunger strikes and #Stansted15 activists fighting against inhumane detention in the UK, and global campaigns to fight gendered and sexual violence with #MeToo and #TimesUp – contribute to the sense that we are in a moment of global action, where national and international uprisings are opening up new alternatives for social and political futures. At the same time, disparities in media representation, state reactions, and police response to different forms of activism expose tensions between the hope for positive change and forward momentum and the recreation and reinforcement of existing oppressions and dynamics of power. This conference asks where performance intervenes in these tensions, examining the value of reading protest as performance, particularly as it intersects with the law and disciplinary structures of power. Grounding itself in the current political moment, we hope the conference will provide an opportunity to engage with current and historical protest in its varying forms and varying spaces – the street, the theatre, the courtroom, and the gallery, amongst others – to analyse the relationship between performance, protest, and the law.

Interdisciplinary in its aims, Action: Arrest draws together academics, artists and practitioners from varying disciplines and their intersections. Honouring the constitutive links between methodologies, content, and form, Action: Arrest resists the cloistering control of academic tradition and discipline and encourages diversity, collaboration, and dissent. We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers, 10-minute provocations, and collaborative and performative papers. We are also very open to suggestions for alternative formats or styles of presentation not listed here.

Proposals for contributions that bear directly on one or more of the above themes are welcome. These might address:

  • Explorations of action and arrest as bodily and affective, and considerations of how they define different bodies.
  • Racialised, gendered and sexualised bodies in performance, protest and arrest.
  • Thinking through the relationship between movement, action, arrest, and stillness, and their relationship to political uprisings and the law.
  • How does action catalyse change, and how is action used as a means of control?
  • Affect as protest, the body protesting itself through exhaustion, fatigue, boredom, irritation, sweat, and excitement.
  • (Non)/Spectacular violence and protest.
  • Protest in and outside the museum, gallery and/or institutional setting (e.g. WHEREISANAMENDIETA, Liberate Tate etc).
  • Protest as the duality and contradictions of arrest as a control of bodies, and as a protection of bodies.
  • Explorations of restorative and transformative justice, penal reform, and abolitionism.
  • The influence of legal structures and policies on recent or historical actions and protests, with particular focus on how this has been used as a regulatory and disciplinary tool.
  • Protest, legal action, and minoritarian feminisms.
  • Resistance to repressive politics through action, arrest, stillness and movement.
  • Considerations of police behaviour, civil unrest, and dissonance. Moments of action and stillness between dissenters and those attempting to exert state control. (e.g. riot police and protesters, state or police interventions in performance works).
  • The relationship between arrest as being taken into legal custody, and arrest as inaction or stillness.
  • The capitulation of radicalism under neoliberal/late capitalist regimes.
  • Languages of visual activism.

Please send 250 word abstracts and 100 word bios and/or artist statements to actionarrest@gmail.com by the 11th of June 2018.

Bryony White and Savannah Whaley

King’s College London

www.actionarrest.wordpress.com

Kindly supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership

 

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CFP: DISTRACTION Birkbeck Institute for Social Research Graduate Conference – deadline 7 May 2018

The Call for Papers for the BISR annual graduate conference has been extended! The theme this year is DISTRACTION.

This conference aims to involve PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines and institutions. It is funded by the Birkbeck Institutes of Social ResearchGender and Sexuality, and Humanities

Dates: 8-9 June 2018

NEW DEADLINE: 7th May 2018. Please send 200 word abstracts and 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk. If you are also interested in taking part in the running of the event such as chairing a panel, please get in touch via this email.

We are delighted to confirm Prof. Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford) and Dr. Sophie Jones (Birkbeck, English) as our keynote speakers.

 

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/fellows-and-academic-staff/d/carolin-duttlinger

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/sophie-jones

 

Full details: http://bit.ly/2hCcxuq

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Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19 deadline 18 June 2018

Call for proposals: BIMI programme 2018-19

Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) is currently planning its programme of events for 2018-19.

We welcome proposals from researchers and students working in any discipline or field across the Schools of Arts, Law, SSHP, and Science.

We are very happy to work in collaboration with research centres and institutes at Birkbeck or at other institutions.

All our events take place in the Birkbeck Cinema, typically on Friday evenings 6-9pm and Saturdays 10-5pm.

We can show films in 16mm and 35mm, as well as a variety of digital formats.

We are especially keen to foreground film and other moving image material that is rarely screened in public.

If you would like to propose an idea for an event, please use the attached form and send it to bimi@bbk.ac.uk – the deadline for submission is Friday 18 June.

Looking forward to hearing about your ideas.

Michael Temple, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, and Essay Film Festival

Matthew Barrington, interim BIMI Manager

Sign up to our newsletter: bimi@bbk.ac.uk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Birkbeck_BIMI

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Birkbeck-Institute-for-the-Moving-Image-542278625939273/

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CFP: Visualising Asia: Deciphering ‘Otherness’ in Visual and Material Cultures – deadline 3 June 2018

Visualising Asia: Deciphering ‘Otherness’ in Visual and Material Cultures

SOAS, University of London

21st September 2018

Confirmed Keynote: Dr Anne Witchard

Historically, Asia has been a contended space of exploration and domination, where both Asian and non-Asian agents sought to define themselves against others. Within this broad historical and geographical context, this international and interdisciplinary conference brings together various forms of visuals, such as films, cartoons, and objects, in their interaction with discourses of ‘other’.  The platforms of visualising Asia were assimilated into daily life and practices, feeding into narratives that transcend any single medium. Due to their visual impact, they became lasting repositories of imagined identities and thus have critical implications for those representing and those being represented. This conference invites discussions on the differing ways ‘otherness’ has been used in both Asian and non-Asian societies through visuals. We encourage the participation from postgraduates, career researchers, scholars, curators, practitioners, and archivists.  The aim is to bring together an array of visualities from across various disciplines in order to reflect on the importance of visuals in knowledge production and circulation within and across cultures and societies.

Wider themes include: empire, multiculturalism, identity, nation, ethnic and cultural minorities, integration, ‘othering’, inclusion, exclusion, power dynamics, representation.

Papers or panels are invited on any topic related to the themes and questions explored in the conference that include but are limited to the following:

  • Representations of Asia by non-Asian cultures across different historical eras.
  • Representations of Asian societies by their neighbouring Asian countries.
  • Representations of minorities within hegemonic discourses in Asia.
  • Gender, ethnicity and class in visual othering of Asia.
  • How and why did representation occur, and the significance and impact for those being represented and those representing.
  • The development of concepts of identity through the use of visual and/or material culture.
  • The politics involved in visual knowledge production.
  • Long-term effects and consequences of visual representations of Asia.
  • The relationship between power and representation. The limits of ‘othering’ and representation.
  • Images of Asia and the development of visual and material industries.
  • Approaches and/or practices in cataloguing images of Asia in archives..

Panels and individual submissions are welcomed.  Please send queries and abstracts of 250-350 words, along with a brief bio of no more than 100 words, to visualisingasia@gmail.com by 3 June 2018.

The conference convenors are Amy Matthewson (SOAS, University of London), and Dr Irene González-López (Kingston University).

 

 

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