Modernism from the Heart: Emotion, Sincerity, and the Novel. A One Day Symposium 28 May 2020 

“Modernism from the Heart: Emotion, Sincerity, and the Novel” 

A one-day symposium on 28 May 2020, 10:45am-6:45pm

Clifton Hill House, University of Bristol

Speakers: Derek Attridge | Doug Battersby | Andrew Bennett & Nicholas Royle | David James | Laura Marcus | Kirsty Martin | Ulrika Maude | Jean-Michel Rabaté

Registration is free, but tickets are limited so early registration is advised. Further info and registration details here: https://modernistemotion.wordpress.com/.

Please contact me at doug.battersby@bristol.ac.uk if you have any queries.

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CFP: Richard Stonley Symposium June 2020 – deadline 30 March 2020

Please find attached call for papers for the 2020 Richard Stonley Symposium taking place this June.

Organisers are keen to receive proposals from a wide range of scholars, on topics including:

  • the Tudor diarist Richard Stonley and his contemporaries
  • early modern reading, writing and diary-keeping
  • early modern work, households and family life
  • political and administrative figures in late-Tudor England
  • working with archival sources and engaging communities with early modern cultural heritage

The deadline for proposals is Monday 30 March 2020 and applications should be sent to: stonleysymposium@gmail.com

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Jenny Diski: A Celebration 7 April 2020

Jenny Diski: A Celebration

A one-day symposium on the wonderful writer Jenny Diski, will be held at the University of Oxford, on 7th April 2020.

Diski wrote in many genres, and was a prolific reviewer, who contributed regularly to the London Review of Books. Diski herself, though, refused to classify her writings, and it is as a writer, first and foremost, that she is appreciated by her many admirers. No reader of hers can fail to be dazzled by her style, or struck by her formal playfulness and innovation. Yet, perhaps owing to her refusal to be confined by boundaries, Diski has tended to slip under the radar, or between the gaps, in academic discussions. This symposium will bring her to the fore by recognising that it is precisely her difference from what we might expect that makes her so exciting, and by drawing together the many aspects of her work.

The keynote speaker for the symposium is the writer Blake Morrison. Jenny Diski’s daughter Chloe Diski will be delivering a paper, and her husband, the poet Ian Patterson, will give the concluding remarks.

Registration will close on 17th March 17:00, book now to secure your place!

Symposium website: https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/jenny-diski-symposium-2020

Contact: Dr Ben Grant benjamin.grant@conted.ox.ac.uk

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Call for Submissions – Destinations deadline 1 March 2020 (ORE)

OXFORD RESEARCH IN ENGLISH

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS ISSUE 11: DESTINATIONS

Destination – the word itself concerns both journey and journey’s end. For this issue of Oxford Research in English, we invite articles that delve into arrival and setting forth in literature, as well as the textual, intertextual and extratextual ways one can examine literary places and spaces. “Destination” derives from the Latin dēstināre—to resolve, to determine, to destine— before journeying into French and arriving in English.

Literary destinations are spatial as well as temporal, with memory and narrative being integral to how we make sense of where we are, and how we come to be. Destinations may be metaphysical or institutional, lieux de mémoire, or itinerant sites that emerge and vanish, in ways that illuminate literary production and interpretation. Texts travel through time: from mind to page, mind to mind, bookstand to bookshelf.

We are interested in submissions from any period or focus within literary studies and related fields that engage with the following topics:

  • Travel writing and journeys evoked in literature
  • Pilgrimage, predestination and fate
  • Temporality of memory and remembrance
  • Diaspora, nation and homeland
  • Circulation of texts, translation and reading across borders
  • Literary traditions genealogies, and the arrival of texts in canons
  • Literary networks and internationalisation
  • Theoretical approaches to readership and authorship – the text as performative site
  • Evolution of literary forms and genre conventions
  • The writer’s oeuvre as teleology, and analyses of an author’s early vs. late styles

Oxford Research in English (ORE) is currently seeking papers of 5-8,000 words for its eleventh issue, to be released in Autumn 2020. Please submit papers for consideration to ore@ell.ox.ac.uk by the deadline of 1st March 2020. We ask that submitted articles be formatted using MHRA.

For our style guide and previous issues of the ORE, please visit our website https://oxfordresearchenglish.wordpress.com/

Oxford Research in English (ORE) is an online journal for postgraduate and early career scholars in English, Film Studies, Creative Writing, and related disciplines. All submissions are peer-reviewed by current graduate students at, or associated with, the University of Oxford

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CFP: Journeys Across Media 2020: Sharing Stories deadline 14 Feb 2020

Journeys Across Media 2020: Sharing Stories

University of Reading, 3rd April 2020

In the White Album, Joan Didion writes that “we tell ourselves stories in order to live […] We look for the sermon in the suicide, for the social or moral lesson in the murder of five. We interpret what we see, select the most workable of the multiple choices” (1). The act of storytelling involves a process of choice making – we choose the details to include and exclude, we shape narratives depending on who we share our stories with and how. This conference is interested in exploring methods and approaches to sharing stories in theatre, performance, film, television and literary practice. We are also interested in innovative ways of disseminating research stories. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we seek to investigate connections between different modes of storytelling through the varied forms of current postgraduate and ECR research.

The conference seeks to draw together panels on topics included but not limited to:

  • Stories and identity
  • False/misleading narratives (propaganda, self-mythologising, “Fake news”)
  • Re-sharing (translation, provocation, distortion, representation) Interpersonal connections in story-making
  • Human connections in sharing
  • Stories of exclusion and exclusion from stories
  • Stories as commodities
  • Sharing research stories: documentary and documented practice
  • Sharing across borders, cultures and communities through reflective practice.
  • Methods of storytelling in theatre and film
  • Digital and DIY storytelling

As a conference, we are open to applications for the following:

  • 20 minute papers
  • Shorter provocations of 5-10 minutes
  • Full panels of 3 x 20 minute papers
  • Participatory Workshops (up to 30 minutes in length)
  • Practice as Research disseminations (up to 30 minutes in length)
  • Video essays (Up to 20 minutes in length)

Please send proposals of 200 words to jamconference2020@gmail.com by 14th February 2020. We would welcome bios of up to 50 words along with your abstracts.

Journeys Across Media: Sharing Stories is organised by members of the postgraduate community at the University of Reading in the Department of Film, Theatre and Television.

The JAM Organising Committee (Mag Mosteanu; Chloe Duane; Sarah Byrne; John Whitney).

Citations

Didion, Joan. The White Album. London: 4th Estate, 2017.

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Economies of Exhaustion I: The Ethics of Academic, Architectural, and Artistic Labour 5 Feb 2pm

Economies of Exhaustion I: The Ethics of Academic, Architectural, and Artistic Labour

Following the UCU strikes in many UK universities during December 2019, which raised pay and conditions as a pressing issue for the academic workforce, discussions of work and labour have risen up the agenda. A series of talks and conversations hosted by Jane Rendell and Peg Rawes, around the theme of ‘economies of exhaustion’, will draw on debates in critical university studies and feminism around care and precarity; as well as ecology, equity and ethics; cross-cutting with university EDI (equality, diversity and inclusivity) initiatives and current responses to the climate emergency, to explore contemporary concerns regarding work and labour.

The first conversation, chaired by Jane Rendell, through the Bartlett Ethics Commission, involves presentations from Igea Troiani, Claudia Dutson, Sophie Hope, Jenny Richards, David Roberts and others, and will focus on work and labour in art, architecture and academia.

Please join us, from 2-5pm on Tue 5 Feb, in Room 6.02, The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, 22 Gordon St, London, WC1H 0QBThe Bartlett School of Architecture.

All welcome.

 

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CFP: Critical Race Studies and the Premodern – deadline 24 Jan 2020

Call for Papers

Critical Race Studies and the Premodern: Archive and Seminar

Funded by the CHASE Consortium, the Universities of East Anglia and Sussex are hosting two postgraduate training workshops on critical race studies and the pre-modern. The first of these will be held at the University of East Anglia, 23-24 March 2020, and will focus on teaching and pedagogy; the second will be held at The University of Sussex, 8-9 June 2020, and will focus on research. Both events are designed to develop students’ professional skills. We invite expressions of interest from all postgraduates working in the Humanities (giving papers, designing and chairing sessions, attending).

This collaboration seeks to foster dialogue around race in the scholarship and pedagogy of medieval and early modern studies, within the context of decolonising the curriculum. Race is an area of intense interest and concern for academics and undergraduates, but also for doctoral students negotiating questions of race in their own research and early teaching experiences. It is often assumed that the initiative to decolonise universities and their curricula began with activist demands to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes from the University of Cape Town (in 2015), a movement then rapidly taken up in Britain. Yet whether in explorations of the ‘post-colonial Middle Ages’ (Cohen, 2000) or the ‘darker side of the Renaissance’ (Mignolo, 1995), or earlier initiatives, the scholarly study of earlier periods has long confronted such questions (see, more recently Geraldine Heng, 2018). In medieval studies, following the lead of Medievalists of Color in light of recent controversies, these debates have started. For early modern studies, initiatives such as RaceB4Race are also opening the conversation in the US. Our initiative creates the opportunity for postgraduates to participate in an urgent conversation and to intervene at a critical moment for the discipline.  The events will reassert the importance of the medieval and early modern periods for any understanding of ideas underpinning conceptions of race and coloniality. They will explore how these periods can be taught and researched in ways that inform contemporary debates about the legacies of imperialism and slavery, and the historical construction of whiteness. This will involve questions of the coloniality of power, gender, and ideology, the nature and extent of the canon, critical languages, materiality and curatorial practices, as well as the histories, current states, and futures of our disciplines.

An indicative outline of session topics for each event is as follows:

East Anglia: Teaching Race:

Confirmed Plenary Speaker: Mary Rambaran-Olm

Critical Vocabulary

Decolonising The Curriculum (theoretical, conceptual, historical; disciplinary self-consciousness/history of the discipline)

Canonicity and Anthologising

Decolonising the Curriculum (Practical)

New Resources

New Directions (conclusion, summary)

Sussex: Researching Race:

New Perspectives on Research into Race

Recovering Race from the Archive

Race and Religion

Staging Race

Material Cultures

The Way Forward

Each session will be led by a postgraduate (or postgraduates), with a designated faculty member as support.

If you wish to attend either or both please send expressions of interest, ideas, comments, alternative themes the contact addresses below by Friday 24 Jan. Please accompany your comments with a statement of your research interests. We actively encourage and welcome proposals and enquiries from BAME students.

For the East Anglia event: W.Rossiter@uea.ac.uk

For the Sussex event: a.hadfield@sussex.ac.uk

  1. B. CHASE students are eligible for funding to attend this event: see the CHASE website for further details.

 

 

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Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group: 12 February 2020 12-1.30pm

Wednesday 12 February, 12-1.30pm

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square.

‘Skill and Narrative Form in Early Eighteenth-Century Adventure Fiction’

Robert Stearn

In this session we will look at how a passage from Defoe’s The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719), is treated in an early abridgement of the novel, undertaken for Edward Midwinter by the jobbing printer Thomas Gent, and published in 1722. Readings from these two books will be compared with a brief excerpt from The Adventures, and Surprizing Deliverances, of James Dubourdieu, and his Wife (1719) – a short novel of unknown authorship, published within months of the first two volumes of Robinson Crusoe and addressed to the same world of maritime adventure as Defoe’s fiction. The first of many similar works, Dubourdieu sought to capitalise on the success of Crusoe, while offering an intriguing revision of Defoe’s narrative poetics and ideological investments. A number of the men involved in printing and selling it would go on to publish and – in the case of Willian Chetwood – write further volumes of adventure fiction.

Taking together Defoe’s continuation of his novel, a re-written version of Crusoe, and a newly-composed piece of prose fiction that was advertised as ‘proper to be Bound up with Robinson Crusoe’, we can ask: what might the alternations made to Crusoe by abridgements and supplements tell us about eighteenth-century ways of reading in general, and about critical assessments of Defoe’s fiction in particular? How might the formal choices of Defoe, Gent, and the author of Dubourdieu  – including their decisions about the representation of speech and audience and about the segmentation of narrative episodes – produce or reflect different concepts of skill and practical knowledge? How are these ideas about skill shaped by their elaboration in relation to imagined colonial violence? And, how should we understand the place of commercial and material constraints in all these choices?

Robert Stearn is a PhD student in English at Birkbeck, working on skill and service in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. His thesis draws on a range of verbal and visual sources – visual satire, material culture, life-writing by employers and servants, poetry, and prose fiction – in order to chart the changing shapes of skill and its everyday, non-artisanal and non-professional, consistency.

Readings: if you would like to attend this Reading Group, please email Kate Retford, at k.retford@bbk.ac.uk, to be sent a PDF copy of these texts

  1. Daniel Defoe, The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (London, 1719), pp. 120-24.
  2. The Life And most Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner (London, 1722), pp. 252-55.
  3. ‘Ambrose Evans’, The Adventures, and Surprizing Deliverances, of James Dubourdieu and his Wife (London, 1719), pp. 1-16
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Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies – Programme of Events Spring Term 2020 

Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies

Programme of Events Spring Term 2020

Wednesday 5th February, 6.00 pm. Alison Booth (Virginia): ‘George Eliot Where She Lived: Illustration and Topo-Biography.’

A close reading of illustrations of George Eliot’s complete works after her death reveals a discourse of literary topo-biography (see Booth’s Homes and Haunts [Oxford UP 2016]) that encodes gender, class, and national heritage as well as tourism. We can connect such textual and cultural studies with the findings of mid-range reading, as practiced in Collective Biographies of Women. Short biographies of George Eliot circulated in twenty-seven volumes of assorted female lives, such as Women Novelists of Queen Victoria’s Reign and Lives of Girls Who Became Famous. With the varied methods of textual criticism and digital analysis, this talk draws out spatial and collective dimensions of life narrative, standing back from ostensibly objective geolocation and biographical facts and challenging genre distinctions of fiction and nonfiction. Versions of one woman’s life reveal the circulation of anecdotes and tropes as well as reliance on punctuating moves to new houses, cities, countries, and social circles. In particular, the great woman writer may be placed in the typical provincial cottage or a specific middle-class country house; Dorothea Brooke’s ordeal in Rome may be illustrated with a photograph captioned “A View of Middlemarch (Coventry).” If the Complete Works try to preserve an English Midland, biographies of Eliot among many women can point us toward a cosmopolitan, intersectional reading of representations of mobility and change in women’s lives.

Wednesday 11th March, 6.00 pm. Deborah Lutz (Louisville): ‘Marginalia and Other Forms of Graffiti.’

This talk considers volumes from writers’ libraries that they have marked, autographed, and supplemented with matter such as pressed plants, feathers, and locks of hair. These haptic texts, thickened with time and adaptation, gained singularity, with meaning developing when samples of the real were left behind. George Eliot used some of her books to memorialize—to observe a passing moment, to remember a personal exchange—while in others she wrote comments, indexes on their endpapers, and other glosses of a scholarly nature. Charlotte and Emily Brontë, contrarily, penned diaries in their books, doodled in them, and generally defaced them. This thinking of the published, printed volume as paper with blank spaces inciting script, as a bearer of relationships and memory, as a magical object set in place and time, and as a space that could be inhabited, shaped these writers’ own creative acts. The paratextual for them stretched far outside the more traditional definition of the term, jumping the boundary of the book and the page altogether.

All are welcome to join us for these events, which will take place in the Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square.

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Audio-Visual Practice as Research – Derek Jarman Lab Training Courses

The Derek Jarman Lab offers a new short course: Audio-Visual Practice as Research

This intensive short course teaches attendees how to make effective use of moving images in the context of their academic research. Starting off with a survey of the types of filmmaking that lend themselves to a research-led approach (documentary, video essay, video art, ethnographic film, and digital anthropology), we then move on to a series of hands-on practical exercises in using cameras and editing digital footage. The course includes a range of activities and class discussions, and at the end of it each participant will complete their own essay film. The training is designed to be introductory, and no previous knowledge of film practice is required. Participants work in small groups and learn how to use widely available digital cameras and popular editing software to create visually stimulating and intellectually engaging videos. An integral part of the training is discussing participants’ research interests and how audio-visual methods can be used in the context of their field of work.

The course fee is £400.

Upcoming course dates:

Spring Term

17 January 2020 (6pm-9pm),

24 January 2020 (6pm-9pm),

25 January 2020 (10.30am-6pm),

31 January 2020 (6pm-9pm),

7 February 2020 (6pm-9pm)

If you are interested in signing up, please send an email to bartek.dziadosz@bbk.ac.uk

More information can be found here: jarmanlab.bbk.ac.uk

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