Murray Seminars Autumn Term 2018-19

I’m writing with details of this term’s Murray Seminars on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck. These advanced research seminars are open to all, and attract interested members of the public, staff and students from other London colleges and beyond.  They are an opportunity to hear and contribute to cutting-edge research, often at the very early stages of work in progress.

All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

This term’s seminars are:

16 October, Lisa Monnas

Vestments and Textiles in Hans Memling’s ‘God with Singing and Music-making Angels 

Three large panels in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, painted by Hans Memling in the 1480’s, represent a heavenly scene framed by clouds, which part to reveal the central figure of God attended by sixteen singing and music-making angels. Thye once formed the top of the high altarpiece of the Benedictine Abbey of Santa Maria la Réal in Nájera, in Spain. In the central panel, God is depicted vested as priest and ruler, and the angels in this and in the flanking scenes wear clerical dress. The work has been interpreted as relating to the Good Friday liturgy and the Exaltation of the Cross, but since the panels originally formed the top of an altarpiece whose main subject was the Assumption of the Virgin, this is open to doubt. This paper will re-examine the vestments and textiles in the newly conserved panels, assessing their ‘realism’ and their contribution to the heavenly scene. It will also consider them in the wider context of some of Memling’s other works.

14 November, Jana Gajdosova

Sculpted Genealogies: The Effigies of Bohemian rulers in Prague Cathedral  

With the death of Wenceslas III, the Přemyslid dynasty, which had ruled Bohemia for over four centuries, came to an end. The murder of the young king created chaos in the kingdom for several decades; however, after the marriage of Elizabeth of Přemyslid and John of Luxembourg and the subsequent birth of Charles IV (1316 – 1378), Bohemia reached the height of its political and cultural power in Europe. Charles IV saw himself as a bridge between two Bohemian dynasties – the Přemyslids of the past and the Luxembourgs of his envisioned future. This link was communicated with painted genealogies in at least three of Charles’ castles, and with staged genealogies across Prague. The fascination that Charles had with re-imagining and visualizing his role within the dynastic shift that occurred also found expression in the sculpted genealogies which are the subject of this paper—specifically the effigies of Přemyslids rulers commissioned by Charles IV for Prague Cathedral, which were made to communicate these ideas in sculpture and across real space.

5 December, Marie-Louise Lillywhite 

Blood is Thicker than Water: Artists, Friends and Family Alliances in Seventeenth-Century Venice

How did Venetian artists forge alliances to advance their interests and ensure the continuation of their workshops? Focusing on the painter Palma il Giovane, this paper explores his concerted efforts to continue his family name through strategic marriages, and safeguard his success through advantageous friendships. This study will demonstrate how these potentially positive relationships impacted artistic production in Venice for better, or indeed worse.

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Vacancy: BBK Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies seeks a Postgraduate Intern Deadline Extended 5th October 2018

Vacancy: BBK Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies seeks a Postgraduate Intern Deadline 5th October 2018

Vacancy: Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies:

Postgraduate Intern

Deadline Extended to 5th October 2018

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies seeks a Postgraduate Intern

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies invites applications from postgraduate research students studying at Birkbeck for an Internship to support and develop the activities of the Centre:

The Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

The Centre was first established in 1997 under the directorship of Professor Isobel Armstrong originally to bring together researchers in English, History of Art and History.  It has since developed a reputation for its diverse events that attract national and international scholars. It hosts the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies, which sees speakers coming to Birkbeck throughout the year; it runs the successful annual Dickens Day; and organizes and hosts major conferences, workshops and symposia. The Centre also supports Postgraduate students wishing to organise and run their own events.

THE POSITION

  • This Events Officer internship for the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies trains a student to develop, advertise, run, archive and curate a programme of public events:

PLANNING:

  • Collect and generate ideas about speakers, emerging questions, and formats for events (Nineteenth-Century Forum, workshops, day conferences, etc);

IMPLEMENTING:

  • Timetabling and scheduling, including liaising with Centre staff and speakers
  • AV/IT: identifying speakers’ needs, liaising with relevant school AV/IT staff, booking and setting up IT
  • Helping setting up speaker events in the Keynes Library and ensuring that it is returned to its original seating after the talk;
  • helping to organise refreshments where appropriate;
  • administering speaker expenses.

CENTRE’S WEBSITE:

  • Overseeing and updating the website on a weekly basis; ensuring that all events are listed with appropriate links and any other relevant material;
  • team-working skills: coordinating website updates with the editorial interns on the online journal 19 to ensure that the Centre and Journal websites support reach
  • developing a dedicated PG /postdoc area of the website to showcase/advertise p/g activities(entering student’s activities in the website, such as the 19th reading group, conferences, blogs, etc.).
  • Producing, archiving, and curating materials related to events and research activities

NETWORKS/PUBLICITY:

  • Developing and overseeing strategies for the Centre’s profile on social networks (twitter, Facebook, etc);
  • Producing, coordinating, and editing the Centre’s Blog, including commissioning and overseeing blog submissions, and liaising with relevant staff.
  • Networking and linking researchers at different stages in their career
  • Fostering and coordinating links between staff and the postgraduate community within the centre and its research clusters
  • Developing a publicity strategy (sending information of Centre’s activities to other nineteenth-century websites; identifying and contacting other communities of practitioners to enhance interdisciplinary reach of the Centre’s activities).

INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS:

  • Centre meetings – Attend and take minutes at termly Centre meetings; liaise with Centre Director/s about minutes/actions.

ELIGIBILITY:

  • We invite applications from postgraduate research students from across the College with interests in the nineteenth century. Applicants should expect to be enrolled as students at Birkbeck until end of September 2019

SELECTION CRITERIA

Essential

  • Research interests in Nineteenth-Century Studies
  • Organizational and clerical skills
  • Independence and initiative

Desirable but NOT essential

  • organization of research activities such as Reading Groups, Seminars or Conferences
  • Involvement in the activities of the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies
  • Social media skills

REMUNERATION:

£16 per hour. The hours will be agreed on a flexible basis with the Centre Directors (spread across three terms to work out at an average of 3.5 hours per week for 35 weeks)

APPLICATION:

Please email a letter of application, outlining your reasons for applying for the post, and a CV, together with the name of your supervisor, from whom we will require a reference, to Dr Victoria Mills (v.mills@bbk.ac.uk) in the School of Arts by 5.00pm on Friday 5th October 2018

Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed shortly thereafter (date tbc but likely to be Tuesday 9 October)

Please direct any enquiries to Dr Victoria Mills (v.mills@bbk.ac.uk).

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Vacancy C19: Postgraduate Editorial Intern in Academic Publishing Online – deadline extended 5 October 2018

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

seeks a Postgraduate Editorial Intern in Academic Publishing Online

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies invites applications from Birkbeck’s postgraduate research students for an Internship in Academic Publishing Online to manage our web journal:

19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century

(www.19.bbk.ac.uk)

Deadline for application: 5.00pm on Friday 5 October 2018

The Journal

Launched on 1 October 2005, 19 is an electronic publishing initiative originally designed to publicize and disseminate the research activities carried out by Birkbeck’s Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, and to provide practical research and professional development opportunities for the many postgraduate students undertaking research degrees in nineteenth-century studies at the College. The journal is now housed in the Open Library of Humanities https://www.openlibhums.org, allowing free and open access to its contents. It is fully peer-reviewed and aggregated with NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship). It is now recognized and respected as a leading journal in the field, known for exciting, leading research and as an innovative and field-setting example of Open Access practice.

The Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

The Centre was first established in 1997 under the directorship of Professor Isobel Armstrong originally to bring together researchers in English, History of Art and History.  It has since developed a reputation for its diverse events that attract national and international scholars. It hosts the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies, which sees speakers coming to Birkbeck throughout the year; it runs the annual Dickens Day; and organizes and hosts major conferences, workshops and symposia. The Centre also provides opportunities for Postgraduate students to organise and run events.

The Position

The postgraduate editorial internship in Academic Publishing Online trains a student to manage 19, working with another intern under the supervision of the journal’s General Editor, Dr Carolyn Burdett, its section Editor, Dr Victoria Mills, and the Editor for systems, Dr David Gillott, and with the guidance of the Editorial Board. The appointee will participate fully in the day-to-day running of the journal and help manage the Centre’s website.  Responsibilities include maintenance and resourcing of 19 and the Centre’s website; liaising with and between guest editor, authors and publisher; overseeing the smooth operation of the peer review system; supporting authors in securing image permissions; copy editing essays and other submitted materials; aiding the proofing processes; promoting and publicizing the journal; and taking an active role in web publishing initiatives, including innovation to increase the journal’s reach and influence. The postholder will be supported and mentored by an intern already in post and, in turn, will mentor the next intern. There will also be Centre-focused activity, including curation of the Centre’s presence in social media and elsewhere, and help with blog initiatives; contributing to the archiving of the Centre’s work; and participation in initiatives with postgraduate students working in the nineteenth century. Postholders will attend Centre meetings, and will be expected to be active participants and, where appropriate, helpers in the Centre’s programme of seminars, conferences and symposia.

Eligibility

We invite applications from postgraduate research students from across the College.  Research interests in the nineteenth century are desirable but not essential, though we would expect applicants to have some interest in the period. Applicants should expect to be enrolled as students at Birkbeck until end of the academic year 2019-20. Exceptionally, students in their first year of MPhil/PhD can be appointed but the norm will be for students to have completed their first year of study.

Selection Criteria

Essential

  • Excellent literacy skills
  • Organizational and clerical skills
  • Independence and initiative
  • Good communication skills

Desirable but NOT essential

  • Research interests in Nineteenth-Century Studies
  • Web authoring and design skills
  • Experience in electronic publishing
  • Editing experience
  • Organization of research activities such as Reading Groups, Seminars or Conferences

Remuneration

£16.00 per hour. The hours will be agreed on a flexible basis with the General Editor (spread across one calendar to work out at an average of 3.5 hours per week for 35 weeks)

Application

Please email a letter of application, outlining your reasons for applying for the post, and CV, together with the name of your supervisor, from whom we will require a reference, to Dr Carolyn Burdett (c.burdett@bbk.ac.uk) in the School of Arts by 5.00pm on Friday 5 October 2018.  Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed early on in the autumn term (date tbc).

Please direct any enquiries to Dr Carolyn Burdett (c.burdett@bbk.ac.uk).

 

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CFP: BRAKC Research Centre 2018-19: Deadline 30 September 2018

Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) is a research centre based in the School of Arts. We study the artistic representation of human belonging, of the human bond, in literature, film, photography, paintings, and other art forms. How is this bond presented across time and cultures, how is it analysed, deconstructed, reinvented? BRAKC was established ten years ago and since then we have organised many conferences, symposia, seminars, reading groups, exhibitions, interrogating the concepts of “family”, “kinship”, and “community”.

We would like to encourage interested research students in the School of Arts to play a prominent role in the activities of the centre. We invite proposals for research events in 2018-19. Some funding is available if needed for the organisation of these events. Although organisers will not be paid, they will have something to add to their CVs!

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words to Dr Nathalie Wourm, Director of BRAKC, by 30 September 2018. Selected proposals will be announced shortly after that, and the events will be organised in cooperation with BRAKC.

Email: n.wourm@bbk.ac.uk

Website: http://www.brakc.bbk.ac.uk/

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CFP: Eight Early Modern Symposium – The Courtauld Institute deadline 31 August 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – SUBMIT BY 31 AUGUST 2018

In recent years, a renewed interest in Early Modern rituals, festivals, and performances has prompted a reconsideration of ceremonious processions with a particular focus on their impact on social, cultural, artistic and political structures and practices. Simultaneously, scholars have increasingly acknowledged the mobility of Early Modern artists across geographical, religious and cultural borders. Although processions were witnessed by natives and visitors alike and were therefore prime instances of cross-cultural encounters, their depictions by artists both local and foreign remain a lesser-studied body of visual material. This symposium proposes to explore the visual representations of processions that took place within cross-cultural encounters both within and outside of Europe.

A procession was an act of movement that was particularly charged with meaning; an ambulatory mode of celebration, it had a global resonance in the Early Modern period. Processionals impressed foreign dignitaries, established modes of rule, communicated traditions and negotiated power balances and were highly sensory occasions – as such they lent themselves readily to visual representation and were enthusiastically recorded in literature. Pageantries, military processions and Joyous Entries (Blijde Inkomsten) were recorded in a variety of media, as exemplified by the festival books celebrating the ephemeral constructions orchestrated for Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand’s arrival in Antwerp (1635) or the eighteenth-century paintings depicting Venice’s dazzling boat parades in honour of foreign dignitaries. Furthermore, ceremonial processions conceived for births, weddings, circumcision feasts and funerals occasioned visual representations such as the colourful Mughal miniature Wedding Procession of Dara Shikoh in presence of Shah Jahan (1740). In addition, the notion of procession can be expanded to encompass various expressions of mobility that could be understood and were often depicted as a procession. Both Jan van Scorel’s frieze-like painting of the knightly brotherhood commemorating their Holy Land pilgrimage (c. 1530) and the depiction of ambassadors travelling with their retinue to foreign courts and cities can be perceived as a form of procession. Thus, the structure of a procession was increasingly adopted in the Early Modern period to depict moments of exchange and motion propelled by the quest for knowledge, as much as diplomatic concerns and religious piety. Well-known examples include The Voyage to Calicuttapestry series (1504) as well as the highly detailed printed frieze of a merchant endeavour by Hans Burgkmair (The King of Cochin, 1508).

We welcome proposals for papers that engage with processions in the Early Modern period (c. 1500-1800) in the context of cross-cultural encounters, with the locations of cross-cultural interaction defined here as both inter or extra-European and beyond the “East meets West” dynamic. Participants are invited to explore artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary divides, and to examine drawings, prints, alba amicorum, painting, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture, and the intersections between them. Contributions from other disciplines, such as the history of science and conservation, are welcome. We invite 20-minute papers that explore, but are not limited to, the following questions:

  • How is the format of the procession used to structure visual representations of Early Modern ceremonial occasions and cultural difference?
  • How were processions perceived visually both by local and foreign artists?
  • Moreover, what audiences were interested in these visual representations and what scope did such a broad and diverse range of visual material serve? It is widely acknowledged, for instance, that Festival Books were not only designed for the audience of the spectacle, but also for armchair readers who could thus experience the procession as if they had been present.
  • In what way does the visual representation of a procession signify a means of negotiating between one’s own identity, heritage and outlook whilst in dialogue with another culture?
  • How did diplomatic encounters encourage the production of procession scenes both during and after the diplomatic mission, such as the depiction of gift-giving ceremonies? We strongly encourage speakers to also consider less conventional modes of processions. Could, for instance, the sequential depiction of costumes in costume albums also be interpreted as a procession of some sorts?
  • Through which visual strategies and spatial arrangements did the ephemeral decorations and arches erected on the occasion of glorious entries orchestrate a procession through the urban space, or thematise the idea of cross-cultural encounter?
  • What are the effects (both ephemeral and lasting) of these processions that sometimes involve the construction of specific architectural constructions and temporary settings (e.g. the Field of the Cloth of Gold, 1520)?

The Early Modern Symposium offers an opportunity for research students from universities both in the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. We invite proposals from graduate students, early career researchers, conservators, and curators. Talks that draw upon technical analysis and other theoretical approaches are equally welcome.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a short biography by 31 August 2018 to:

talitha.schepers@courtauld.ac.uk and alice.zamboni@courtauld.ac.uk

The aim of this postgraduate symposium is to provide a platform for Early Career Researchers and postgraduate students to share their research with peers. We may be able to provide a subsidy for travel and accommodation costs, but please be aware that this may not cover all of your expenses. We prioritise candidates from the UK and Europe. We will notify successful applicants by Monday 10 September 2018.

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VACANCY: Art History Link Up – deadline is TOMORROW

Please find the attached call for teaching assistants on a terrific programme that is helping state school children study art history A level. The deadline is tomorrow, though there is some leeway on that – but if you are interested, you are urged to get in touch with the organiser as soon as possible.

Art History Link Up

AHLU teacher application form

AHLU teaching job pack

Job advertisement AHLU teacher 2018

 

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Funding: Venetian Research Programme: British and Commonwealth Applicants – deadline 1st May 2018

Venetian Research Programme:

British and Commonwealth Applicants

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation – British and Commonwealth Committee – announces its 2018-2019 programme of grants for study based on travel to and research in Venice and the Veneto and other territories of the former Venetian Republic.

Grants will be awarded for historical research on Venice and its empire, and for the study of contemporary Venetian society and culture. Applicants from all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences are eligible for areas of study including, but not limited to: anthropology; archaeology; architecture; art; bibliography; economics; history; history of science; law; literature; music; political thought; religion; theatre; film and television. Applications for research on the environment and conservation are welcomed. Other relevant research interests will be considered.

The application deadline for the British and Commonwealth Programme is 1st May 2018.

Applications should be submitted online at http://delmas.org/grants/venetian-program-grants/venetian-research-program-british-commonwealth/

The awards will be announced by the early summer.

Eligible applicants must:

  • Be citizens or permanent residents of Great Britain or the Commonwealth, and/or be enrolled for research at a British or Commonwealth university, and/or be permanent or affiliated members of a British or Commonwealth university. Experienced curatorial or conservation staff at British or Commonwealth galleries and museums are also welcome to apply.
  • Have experience of research at graduate level or equivalent. If a doctoral student, to have fulfilled all doctoral requirements before completion of the thesis.

Grants for the maximum amount – normally £5000.00 – are rarely awarded. Funding is granted primarily for transportation and accommodation, but additional research expenses may also be considered. Scholars who have already received and accepted a Delmas grant are eligible to apply for grants, normally for one month, to continue the work related to the previous grant, focused on Venetian material in libraries, archives, museums or galleries outside Venice. Applicants must not submit for funding for both grants within the same year.

Applicants must notify the Committee immediately upon receipt of any other grant for research in the same area.

Any person who has accepted three or more Delmas grants for Venetian research (regardless of amount or timing) will be ineligible for consideration for two programme years after the previous grant. Thereafter, the two-year hiatus continues to apply after each grant.

All successful applicants must submit a report to the Chairman within three months of completing their funded period of research. Failure to do so will render applicants ineligible for future Delmas funding.

How to apply

The Foundation is now using a two-step online application form.
Step 1: Register by providing your contact information and creating a login.
Step 2: Fill in the online application.  After your application has been submitted, you may log in to monitor the arrival of your Letters of Recommendation. Make sure you have given your referees ample notice of your intention to apply and the nature of your research.

 

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CANCELLED – ASSC: Designed in Parallel or in Translation? 2 March

Please note that Friday’s talk has been cancelled due to adverse weather.

Finola O’Kane Crimmins (UCD Dublin)

Designed in Parallel or in Translation? 

Plantation Landscapes from Ireland, Jamaica and Georgia 1730-1830

2 March, 6pm, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square

 

 

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Murray Seminar: Emmanuele Lugli – Tuesday 13 February 5pm

Dear Student,

I’m writing with details of next week’s Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art at Birkbeck. These advanced research seminars are open to all, and attract interested members of the public, staff and students from other London colleges and beyond.  They are an opportunity to hear and contribute to cutting-edge research, often at the very early stages of work in progress.  The timing allows you to attend and still go to classes on the same evening.  All this term’s seminars take place in the History of Art Department at Birkbeck (43, Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD) in Room 114 (The Keynes Library) at 5pm.  Talks finish by 5.50pm (allowing those with other commitments to leave) and are then followed by discussion and refreshments.  We hope to see you there.

Emmanuele Lugli  Tuesday 13 February

Chasing Absence: The Body of Christ and the Measures to Enter in Touch with it

This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the ‘mensura Christi,’ or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its marginalization in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the ‘mensura Christi’ relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationships of measuring practices, visual belief, and religious orders, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.

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