CFP: Richard Stonley Symposium June 2020 – deadline 30 March 2020

Please find attached call for papers for the 2020 Richard Stonley Symposium taking place this June.

Organisers are keen to receive proposals from a wide range of scholars, on topics including:

  • the Tudor diarist Richard Stonley and his contemporaries
  • early modern reading, writing and diary-keeping
  • early modern work, households and family life
  • political and administrative figures in late-Tudor England
  • working with archival sources and engaging communities with early modern cultural heritage

The deadline for proposals is Monday 30 March 2020 and applications should be sent to: stonleysymposium@gmail.com

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CFP: Journeys Across Media 2020: Sharing Stories deadline 14 Feb 2020

Journeys Across Media 2020: Sharing Stories

University of Reading, 3rd April 2020

In the White Album, Joan Didion writes that “we tell ourselves stories in order to live […] We look for the sermon in the suicide, for the social or moral lesson in the murder of five. We interpret what we see, select the most workable of the multiple choices” (1). The act of storytelling involves a process of choice making – we choose the details to include and exclude, we shape narratives depending on who we share our stories with and how. This conference is interested in exploring methods and approaches to sharing stories in theatre, performance, film, television and literary practice. We are also interested in innovative ways of disseminating research stories. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we seek to investigate connections between different modes of storytelling through the varied forms of current postgraduate and ECR research.

The conference seeks to draw together panels on topics included but not limited to:

  • Stories and identity
  • False/misleading narratives (propaganda, self-mythologising, “Fake news”)
  • Re-sharing (translation, provocation, distortion, representation) Interpersonal connections in story-making
  • Human connections in sharing
  • Stories of exclusion and exclusion from stories
  • Stories as commodities
  • Sharing research stories: documentary and documented practice
  • Sharing across borders, cultures and communities through reflective practice.
  • Methods of storytelling in theatre and film
  • Digital and DIY storytelling

As a conference, we are open to applications for the following:

  • 20 minute papers
  • Shorter provocations of 5-10 minutes
  • Full panels of 3 x 20 minute papers
  • Participatory Workshops (up to 30 minutes in length)
  • Practice as Research disseminations (up to 30 minutes in length)
  • Video essays (Up to 20 minutes in length)

Please send proposals of 200 words to jamconference2020@gmail.com by 14th February 2020. We would welcome bios of up to 50 words along with your abstracts.

Journeys Across Media: Sharing Stories is organised by members of the postgraduate community at the University of Reading in the Department of Film, Theatre and Television.

The JAM Organising Committee (Mag Mosteanu; Chloe Duane; Sarah Byrne; John Whitney).

Citations

Didion, Joan. The White Album. London: 4th Estate, 2017.

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CFP: Critical Race Studies and the Premodern – deadline 24 Jan 2020

Call for Papers

Critical Race Studies and the Premodern: Archive and Seminar

Funded by the CHASE Consortium, the Universities of East Anglia and Sussex are hosting two postgraduate training workshops on critical race studies and the pre-modern. The first of these will be held at the University of East Anglia, 23-24 March 2020, and will focus on teaching and pedagogy; the second will be held at The University of Sussex, 8-9 June 2020, and will focus on research. Both events are designed to develop students’ professional skills. We invite expressions of interest from all postgraduates working in the Humanities (giving papers, designing and chairing sessions, attending).

This collaboration seeks to foster dialogue around race in the scholarship and pedagogy of medieval and early modern studies, within the context of decolonising the curriculum. Race is an area of intense interest and concern for academics and undergraduates, but also for doctoral students negotiating questions of race in their own research and early teaching experiences. It is often assumed that the initiative to decolonise universities and their curricula began with activist demands to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes from the University of Cape Town (in 2015), a movement then rapidly taken up in Britain. Yet whether in explorations of the ‘post-colonial Middle Ages’ (Cohen, 2000) or the ‘darker side of the Renaissance’ (Mignolo, 1995), or earlier initiatives, the scholarly study of earlier periods has long confronted such questions (see, more recently Geraldine Heng, 2018). In medieval studies, following the lead of Medievalists of Color in light of recent controversies, these debates have started. For early modern studies, initiatives such as RaceB4Race are also opening the conversation in the US. Our initiative creates the opportunity for postgraduates to participate in an urgent conversation and to intervene at a critical moment for the discipline.  The events will reassert the importance of the medieval and early modern periods for any understanding of ideas underpinning conceptions of race and coloniality. They will explore how these periods can be taught and researched in ways that inform contemporary debates about the legacies of imperialism and slavery, and the historical construction of whiteness. This will involve questions of the coloniality of power, gender, and ideology, the nature and extent of the canon, critical languages, materiality and curatorial practices, as well as the histories, current states, and futures of our disciplines.

An indicative outline of session topics for each event is as follows:

East Anglia: Teaching Race:

Confirmed Plenary Speaker: Mary Rambaran-Olm

Critical Vocabulary

Decolonising The Curriculum (theoretical, conceptual, historical; disciplinary self-consciousness/history of the discipline)

Canonicity and Anthologising

Decolonising the Curriculum (Practical)

New Resources

New Directions (conclusion, summary)

Sussex: Researching Race:

New Perspectives on Research into Race

Recovering Race from the Archive

Race and Religion

Staging Race

Material Cultures

The Way Forward

Each session will be led by a postgraduate (or postgraduates), with a designated faculty member as support.

If you wish to attend either or both please send expressions of interest, ideas, comments, alternative themes the contact addresses below by Friday 24 Jan. Please accompany your comments with a statement of your research interests. We actively encourage and welcome proposals and enquiries from BAME students.

For the East Anglia event: W.Rossiter@uea.ac.uk

For the Sussex event: a.hadfield@sussex.ac.uk

  1. B. CHASE students are eligible for funding to attend this event: see the CHASE website for further details.

 

 

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CFP: Dandelion Journal – submission deadline 1 August 2020

Dandelion Journal

Call for Papers

Submissions are invited on the theme of

ANIMALS

“The main shortcoming of humanistic scholarship is its extreme anthropocentrism”, Edward O Wilson recently claimed, arguing that this was “a major cause of the alarming decline in public esteem and support of the humanities”. The humanities have begun to pay attention to the depredations of the Anthropocene and to our animality, our animal origins, in the work of Donna Harraway and Pierre Huyghe, to give two notable examples. However, it could also be argued that they have narrowed dramatically, to become obsessed with individual human identity, advancing the causes of particular, discrete groups of humans. A position one could say is hyper-Anthropocenic, one following the atomizing, conflict-generating logic of neo-liberalism, which one can in turn relate to an epidemic of self-obsession and narcissism in the mirror-world of the culture at large.

Can an increased concern in the humanities with animals and animality, and therefore with nature, and by extension science, offer a way out of this impasse? Animals are still at the centre of our culture; they have always answered out needs, and our attitude to them is as conflicted as it has always been. The anthropomorphism that still dominates our attitude to them often takes on sentimental forms, yet it developed as an entirely utilitarian way to aid hunting in prehistory. When we begin to consider animals and animality we enter a world of contradictions. We spend tens of millions on pet food, but still slaughter huge numbers of animals. We could not have survived the last Ice Age without their furs and skins, and it was increased consumption of their meat that led to the increased brain size that allowed our bipedalism to advance, and thus to the descent of the larynx, and thus language; in short, this almost-cannibalism, this never-ending slaughter, was essential to our becoming human.

George Bataille said that animals dwell in the world “like water in water”, in an unmediated, non-destructive, but utterly determined way, and that humans had also once dwelt in the world in this way. But at some point in prehistory, this changed, and our exploitation of Gaia began. Questions contributors may want to consider are where our differences from animals truly lay?  Where do we find what remains of our animalism? Are there times and privileged circumstances in which we too can dwell in the world ‘like water in water’, and how can we, and should we, create them? How much closer can we come to animals? Is there anything to be said for holding up something programmed to pursue its genetic interests, allowing nothing to stand in its way, without altruism, and beyond good and evil, as a redemptive model? What possibility is there of having genuine access to the umwelt of, and somehow experiencing the full ontological reality of what is biologically different in any case? Can insights about our animality help us exit the Anthropocene without disaster, and not just ensure our survival, but even our self-overcoming, and new way of being in the world?

The word ‘animals’ has many ramifications, various morphologies, histories, and synonyms and antonyms, all of which contributors are free to explore. Topics may be related, but are not limited, to:

  • Animal rights
  • The Anthroposcene/Post-Anthropocene
  • Anthrozoology
  • The post-human
  • The trans-human
  • Humanism and anti-humanism
  • Animal Studies
  • Animalism
  • Beastliness
  • Animal consciousness
  • The Chthulucene
  • The animal as trope
  • Anthropomorphism and totemism
  • The animal and animalism in philosophy
  • Anthropocentrism
  • Animal-human relations
  • Chimeras and monsters
  • The fabular
  • The apocalyptic and the revenge of nature
  • The animal in horror and science fiction
  • Becoming animal
  • Evolution
  • Extinction
  • Human as animal, animal as human

Submission guidelines

We welcome long articles (of 5000-8000 words), or shorter ones (of 3000-5000 words). We also welcome reviews of books, films, performances, exhibitions, and festivals (of around 1500 words).

We also publish interviews that you may wish to conduct with an author/artist, and artwork including visual art; creative writing; podcasts, and video footage (up to 10 minutes).

We would be happy to discuss ideas for submissions with interested authors prior to the submission deadline.

Please send your submissions to mail@dandelionjournal.org by 1st August, 2020

 

 

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CFP: Glasgow International Fantasy Conversations deadline for submission 12 Jan 2020

Glasgow International Fantasy Conversations

Beyond the Anglocentric Fantastic

28th-29th May 2020

In “Surviving Fantasy Through Post-Colonialism”, Deepa Dharmadhikari writes that she grew up “speaking Marathi with my family, and Hindi with schoolmates and neighbours, but the only children’s books I read were in English. Less than a handful were written by Indian authors about Indian characters.  . . . I grew up with half a tongue.” Her essay invites us to question our own habits: What language do we use when we read, watch, write, or think about Fantasy and the fantastic? What cultural traditions tend to be represented in the “Fantasy canon”? What ethnic and racial groups dominate Fantasy texts, in terms of characters and writers alike? What power dynamics shape the production, distribution, and reception of Fantasy texts? Many of the texts that have been used to define Fantasy are written in English and either set in or inspired by white-dominated spaces in the United States and the United Kingdom, from The Lord of the Rings to the works of George MacDonald, William Morris, L. Frank Baum, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett and J. K. Rowling. Fantasy scholarship has reinforced this tendency, dominated as it is by discussion of English-language texts.

This limited perception of Fantasy is reflective of two key concepts for this year’s symposium: Anglonormativity and Anglocentrism. Anglonormativity refers to the hegemony of the English language, which pressurizes creatives and scholars into using English and writing about English-language texts, and treats scholars and writers in other languages as niche and hence marginalised. Anglocentrism, in turn, refers to the practise of viewing the world through the lens of an English or Anglo-American perspective and with an implied belief, either consciously or unconsciously, in the preeminence of English or Anglo-American culture.

Anglonormativity and Anglocentrism can lead to either ignoring or appropriating the lengthy and rich traditions of Fantasy and the fantastic written in other languages and cultures, many of which predate the Anglophone tradition. Those non-Anglophone traditions have resulted in unique genres separate from Anglocentric Fantasy, others in subgenres like Afrofuturism, and still others in culturally-specific incarnations of Fantasy. Recent years have seen an increase in the publication and profile of works of Fantasy and the fantastic translated from a variety of languages (Chinese, Russian, Greek and Malay, to name but a few) as well as the output of English-speaking authors of colour such as Nalo Hopkinson and Kai Ashante Wilson, who bring their own backgrounds and language into their work. Within Anglophone countries, there has been a slowly growing tendency to centre the perspective of racially, culturally, and ethnically marginalised groups whose perspectives have historically been underrepresented in white Anglocentric fantasy. Indigenous authors are also starting to make their presence known in the fantastic, using the genre to examine the contested space of colonised land, and imagine escape from or alternatives to a history and present of oppression and erasure. Tolkien’s white British English may still be treated as the default for Fantasy, but as Dharmadhikari argues, “Dragons are not universal, and fantasies are not homogenous.”

GIFCon 2020 is a two-day symposium that seeks to examine and honour the heterogeneity of Fantasy and the fantastic beyond Anglonormativity and Anglocentrism. We welcome proposals for papers relating to this theme from researchers and practitioners working in the field of Fantasy and the fantastic across all media, whether within the academy or beyond it. We are particularly interested in submissions from postgraduate and early career researchers. We will also offer creative workshops for those interested in exploring the creative process.

We ask for 300-word abstracts for 20-minute papers, as well as creative presentations that go beyond the traditional academic paper. Regrettably, despite our desire to centre the non-Anglophonic, we are only able to accept papers presented in English.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Non-Anglocentric histories and traditions of Fantasy and the fantastic in all forms of media
  • The postcolonial fantastic, by authors such as Helen Oyeyemi, Salman Rushdie, N. K. Jemisin, Nalo Hopkinson, and Zen Cho
  • The use of real non-Anglophone languages in Fantasy
  • Translation studies and the fantastic
  • Accounts of non-Anglophone scholarship on Fantasy and the fantastic
  • Influence of Anglocentrism and Anglonormativity on the non-Anglocentric and non-Anglonormative
  • The non-Anglocentric European fantastic, e.g. Slavic, Nordic, Mediterranean, Gaelic
  • The (mis)use, exoticism, and appropriation of non-Anglocentric cultural traditions and fantasy lineages into the Fantasy ‘canon’
  • Indigeneity and indigenous self-determination in Indigenous forms of Fantasy
  • Deconstruction, decolonisation, and counterappropriation as topics within and movements surrounding Fantasy texts
  • Postcolonial reception of Anglocentric texts, e.g. the success of Harry Potter in India
  • Implications of “writing back” to Anglophone genres
  • Diasporic Fantasy and the fantastic
  • Relationship between Fantasy and non-Anglocentric genres and forms, e.g. magical realism, masala films, Africanjujuism, shenmo xiaoshuo, fantastique, kaiju, etc.
  • Fantasy and the fantastic in a non-Anglocentric medium, e.g. Bollywood fantasies, manga, anime, jrpgs, Karagöz shadow plays
  • Fan efforts to create space for non-Anglocentric experiences in Anglocentric texts
  • Marginalised traditions within Anglocentric fantasy, i.e. works of the fantastic about and by immigrant communities, religious minorities, and racial and ethnic minorities
  • Relationship between non-Anglocentric Fantasy and the regional cultural industries that produce them
  • The presence or lack thereof of non-Anglocentric Fantasy in Anglocentric spaces
  • Relationship between Fantasy and religious or spiritual beliefs in non-Anglocentric cultures

Please submit a 300-word abstract and a 100-word bionote to gifcon-submissions@glasgow.ac.uk by 12th January 2020 at midnight UTC. For further submission details, visit https://gifcon.org/gifcon-submission-guidelines/

 

 

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CFP: Movable Type UCL Journal

Call for Papers Volume 12 : Nostalgia Summer 2020 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON ENGLISH JOURNAL

Marcel Proust closes the first volume of À la recherche du temps perdu with the assertion that ‘remembrance of a particular form is but regret for a particular moment; and houses, roads, avenues are as fugitive, alas, as the years.’ To Proust, nostalgia for the past, no matter how powerful, can only ever be a pale imitation of previous lived experience.

Coined to describe feelings of homesickness experienced by soldiers abroad, the term nostalgia has since come to stand for sensations of loss with regards to the irretrievable nature of places, communities, and experiences that no longer exist as they once did. Indeed, as Svetlana Boym suggests, these may never even have existed in the first place. In her seminal work The Future of Nostalgia (2001), Boym describes the emotion ‘as a defense mechanism in a time of accelerated rhythms of life and historical upheaval.’ Nostalgia is often construed as a conservative force, one which seeks to revert to past certainties as a response to the mutability of the present. Nevertheless, the act of looking back can also lead to radical leaps forward. In certain circumstances, the retrieval of that which appears lost to the past has the potential to act as a catalyst for renewal.

As our current climate makes clear, the manipulation of nostalgia can have a significant impact on the social fabric, in terms of the way that we conceive of our place in history and our future trajectory.

Volume 12 of UCL English Department’s journal, Moveable Type, looks to explore the nostalgic impulse, broadly interpreted. In addition, we will consider artistic responses such as poetry, flash-fiction and short stories. Some potential topics may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Lost time: memory and temporality in literature
  • Life-writing/auto-fiction
  • Nationalism and revivalist literature
  • Lateness and late-coming
  • Looking back in anger: the dangers of nostalgia
  • The nostalgia of history, myth and folklore
  • Editing: the search for the Ur-text
  • Postcolonialism, decolonialization, and exile
  • Amnesia and forgetting
  • Iconoclasm and nostalgia: policing the past
  • Solastalgia – nostalgia for a prior ecological state
  • The retro
  • Sensory nostalgia
  • The nostalgic impulse in canon formation
  • Hauntological readings of nostalgia

Please send submissions to editors.moveabletype@gmail.com by 1 February 2020 (doc/docx files only), with a short abstract and bio in the main body.

Academic articles are limited to 3000-5000 words and should subscribe to MHRA referencing guidelines. Authors are limited to only one submission. We ask that creative responses do not exceed 5000 words, though they can be an interlinked series of poems or prose pieces. All academic submissions will be double-blind peer reviewed, and feedback will be provided for all submissions.

In case of any queries, please contact Niall Ó Cuileagáin or Sam Caleb at niall.culligan.15@ucl.ac.uk and sam.caleb.18@ucl.ac.uk respectively.

Call for Reviews
We are also accepting pitches for reviews of academic works relevant to the theme of nostalgia, broadly interpreted. Upon the acceptance of a pitch, writers will submit 700 to 1000 word pieces that critically analyse a recent monograph or edition. Potential books could include:
§ Critical editions of authors and texts § Theoretical works that focus on new or developing critical methodologies § Novels, poetry collections, films or dramatic texts § Secondary material on authors that are relevant to the theme of nostalgia

Reviews of recent digital resources are also desired. Books for consideration must have been published since 2017. If this is of interest to you, please send pitches to editors.moveabletype@gmail.com with the full bibliographical information and a few sentences explaining why you want to review the book by 31 December 2019. We do not limit pitches to academic texts only, and welcome pitches for reviews of all genres and media

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CFP: AB 2020: Beardsley Re-Viewed – deadline 30 December 2019

AB 2020: Beardsley Re-Viewed

28–29 May 2020, Bridewell Theatre, St Bride Foundation

Supported by the Alessandra Wilson Fund

Organised by Dr Sasha Dovzhyk

in association with the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

‘The Beardsley “craze”, indeed – if “craze” there be – is really just beginning’. (H. C. Marillier, 1899)

A ‘decadent fakir’ and ‘an intellectual Marcellus’, ‘the Fra Angelico of Satanism’ and ‘the only artist who knows what the dance of seven veils is, and can see that invisible dance’: Aubrey Beardsley was many things to many an observer. He ‘pictured’ some of the iconic volumes of the Yellow Nineties, including works by Ernest Dowson, George Egerton, and Oscar Wilde, and defined the style of the two key periodicals of the English Decadence, The Yellow Book and The Savoy. Exploiting the cheap, accurate, and speedy method of photomechanical reproduction, Beardsley’s black-and-white designs achieved, in his own words, ‘publicity without a frame, and beauty without modelling’. Provoked by his wanton line, the guardians of good morals, parodists, and imitators added fuel to the fire of the Beardsley Craze, while artists worldwide absorbed the lessons of his stylistic economy and near-abstract composition. Although his professional career spanned a mere six years, the aftermath of the 1890s Beardsley boom was felt throughout the twentieth century across the globe. With the publication of Linda Gertner Zatlin’s fundamental Aubrey Beardsley: A Catalogue Raisonné of 2016 to be followed by a major Beardsley exhibition at Tate Britain in 2020, are we in a new ‘Beardsley period’ today?

AB 2020: Beardsley Re-Viewed aims to reclaim the artist for the twenty-first century and revive the subversive and transformative potential of the Beardsleyesque. This two-day conference welcomes interdisciplinary approaches as interventions to established models for Beardsley scholarship and invites debate about academic and museological narratives that have shaped Beardsley’s reputation. In keeping with the transnational turn in the humanities, we will explore responses to Beardsley’s work from a variety of cultural locales and across the arts. We are curious about the metamorphoses of Beardsley’s imagery and styles in the work of Mina Loy and Pablo Picasso, Claude Cahun and Leon Bakst, Vladimir Nabokov and Alexander McQueen, as well as lesser-known cultural figures and movements. While highlighting new archival work, we seek to reassess Beardsley in relation to the urgent debates around mediality, queerness, disabled identities, and camp aesthetics. Finally, we are eager to view and review the largest exhibition of Beardsley’s original drawings scheduled for Spring 2020 at Tate Britain and scrutinise the current ‘Beardsley period’ from within.

Forms of participation

  • Conference papers

We welcome 400-word abstracts for 20-minute individual papers which may reflect on the following themes:

  • AB as camp, AB in camp
  • AB and the economics of artistic freedom
  • Beardsley Women, Beardsley Men
  • AB’s sexuality and sexual iconography
  • Line process in relation to AB
  • Transnational Beardsleyism, global Beardsleyana
  • AB and the mythologies of the artist
  • Bibliophiles, collectors, Beardsleyites
  • AB within New Decadence and New Modernist Studies
  • AB and Medical Humanities
  • Queer perspectives and appropriations of AB

 

  • Contributions to the roundtable on Tate Britain’s Beardsley show

We accept 150-word expressions of interest from potential participants in the roundtable discussion of the upcoming exhibition at Tate Britain.

  • Creative responses

We are interested in featuring creative works that in any way engage with or draw on Beardsley and the Beardsleysque. The projects may include but are in no way limited to installations, readings, performances, photography, textile art, printmaking. Proposals should include a 500-word project descriptions, artist’s CV or Resume, up to 6 links or images of previous/related work.

Please email submissions and 50-word biographies to sasha@sashadovzhyk.com by 30 December 2019.

AB 2020: Beardsley Re-Viewed is generously supported by the Alessandra Wilson Fund.

Alessandra Wilson (1943–2007) was an outstanding teacher and a dedicated comprehensive head, who served 21 years, first at Walsingham School on Clapham Common and then Hampton Community College. Alessandra’s entire professional career was devoted to pursuing the ideal of equal opportunity. In keeping with this vision, we are delighted to offer free attendance to all as well as travel bursaries to students and early-career participants of the conference.

 

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CFP: British Orientalism at Royal Holloway and the Watts Gallery – deadline 31 July 2019

Call for papers

To coincide with Watts Gallery – Artists’ Village (WG-AV) exhibition John Frederick Lewis: Facing Fame (9 July – 3 November 2019) this interdisciplinary event aims to explore new perspectives on the intersection between Orientalism and visual culture across the nineteenth century. Alongside WG-AV’s John Frederick Lewis exhibition, the collection of so-called ‘uncomfortable pictures’ at Royal Holloway (which includes Edwin Long’s Babylonian Marriage Market) will act as a catalyst for wide-ranging debates around Orientalism’s place within British scholarship today. This conference invites contributions that explore the visual material of the Orient in the contexts of transculturation, imaginative geographies, and cultural border crossing in both directions. This event hopes to attract a wide range of perspectives and invites proposals from scholars in all sub-fields of the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Deadline for submissions: 31 July 2019

Please send submissions to Abbie Latham at Watts Gallery – Artists’ Village (curatorialtrainee@wattsgallery.org.uk) by 31 July 2019

Full details at:

https://www.wattsgallery.org.uk/eastern-questions-new-perspectives-british-orientalism/?edit&language=en-gb

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CfP – CHASE PG Journal Brief Encounters (deadline: 17 June)

The editors of Brief Encounters are pleased to open a call for papers for the journal’s fourth issue and warmly invite research students and staff to submit a short article, review or creative piece of work for publication. Submissions deadline: Monday, 17th June 2019.

Brief Encounters is an open access, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, postgraduate journal organised by CHASE. All postgraduate research students, regardless of their funding status, are welcome to submit to the journal as are staff.

For students in particular, publishing in the journal offers the opportunity to experience the peer-review process, to give their research exposure, and to build their publication record.

……………………………………………………………………………..

Call for Papers – Brief Encounters – Issue 4

URL: http://briefencounters-journal.co.uk/BE/pages/view/call-for-submissions

Brief Encounters is now open to submissions from research students and staff at CHASE-affiliated institutions (see below for the list). We welcome submissions in the form of academically rigorous and original articles (500–4,000 words), reviews (500–1,000 words) and creative works.

The deadline for submissions is Monday, 17th June 2019.

Brief Encounters welcomes submissions from any field. The journal’s aim is to improve the exchange of ideas between geographical or disciplinary boundaries. The journal provides a space where researchers can publish short articles and share findings which might not be long enough for publication in another journal. We also aim to help students in creative disciplines share their work and engage with other researchers (see below for more information about this).

There is no theme and all submissions will be considered on their own merits. In the past, articles have reflected the academic diversity of our author-base, with work touching on concepts like belonging, embodiment, sustainability, change, identity, space, deviation and division.

Submitting to the journal provides a valuable opportunity for authors to experience the peer-review process in a constructive environment – something especially valuable for postgraduate students and early-career academics.

What is Brief Encounters?

Brief Encounters is an open access peer-reviewed postgraduate journal, run by doctoral researchers from the CHASE doctoral training partnership to showcase the work of research students, staff and alumni of CHASE-affiliated institutions (see here for the list).

About reviews

Reviews can cover new publications, films, theatre productions, documentaries, and major exhibitions engaging with any aspect of the arts and humanities. Reflecting the ethos of CHASE, we are particularly interested in emerging scholarship and innovative interdisciplinary publications and productions.

About creative works

The editorial board is especially keen to receive submissions for its creative section; potential submissions could include (but are not limited to): video essays, creative writing, documentaries, posters, musical interpretations, and photography. These must be accompanied by a critical commentary of no fewer than 500 words.

Who can submit?

  • CHASE-funded students (see a list of institutions)
  • Postgraduate students at CHASE institutions (regardless of funding status)
  • Alumni of CHASE institutions
  • Individuals employed by CHASE institutions
  • Individuals employed by Non-HEI CHASE partners

Submission guidelines

Submission should be made by the deadline, Monday, 17th June 2019, through the Brief Encounters on-line submission process (see our step-by-step guide).

All submissions will follow MHRA style guidelines (footnotes and bibliography). Please see our style guide for further details.

Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting or, if already registered, can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Along with your article, please submit an abstract (max. 300 words), and a list of key words (max. 5). When you register as an author on the website, please provide a brief bio statement (max. 200 words).

If you have any queries please contact journal@chase.ac.uk

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