Audio-Visual Practice as Research – Derek Jarman Lab Training Courses

The Derek Jarman Lab offers a new short course: Audio-Visual Practice as Research

This intensive short course teaches attendees how to make effective use of moving images in the context of their academic research. Starting off with a survey of the types of filmmaking that lend themselves to a research-led approach (documentary, video essay, video art, ethnographic film, and digital anthropology), we then move on to a series of hands-on practical exercises in using cameras and editing digital footage. The course includes a range of activities and class discussions, and at the end of it each participant will complete their own essay film. The training is designed to be introductory, and no previous knowledge of film practice is required. Participants work in small groups and learn how to use widely available digital cameras and popular editing software to create visually stimulating and intellectually engaging videos. An integral part of the training is discussing participants’ research interests and how audio-visual methods can be used in the context of their field of work.

The course fee is £400.

Upcoming course dates:

Spring Term

17 January 2020 (6pm-9pm),

24 January 2020 (6pm-9pm),

25 January 2020 (10.30am-6pm),

31 January 2020 (6pm-9pm),

7 February 2020 (6pm-9pm)

If you are interested in signing up, please send an email to bartek.dziadosz@bbk.ac.uk

More information can be found here: jarmanlab.bbk.ac.uk

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CHASE and UoL Screen Studies Group Training Day – 19 October 2019

We write to invite you to the annual Screen Studies Group Training Day on:

19 October, 2019 at Goldsmiths.

We attach a programme with a registration link.

https://www.chase.ac.uk/screen-studies-group

This is a one-day session presenting research methods for all new and returning doctoral students. We will address a variety of topics that now concern Screen and Film Studies such as online research, social media; installation work; music videos, production cultures, media industries, creative practice, and live cinema.  The day will include a roundtable on interdisciplinarity.

This event is funded by CHASE, however ALL Screen Studies researchers from ALL institutions are welcome.

Looking forward to greeting you there,

Rachel Moore, SSG coordinator, Goldsmiths College

Who we are:  The University of London Screen Studies Group was founded in 2001 to serve the varied interests of academic staff and postgraduate students who work on screen-related research across the University of London.

Screen Studies Today has two major goals.  The first is to bring together all new film and screen studies doctoral students in London and the environs. It will enable network building around shared specialisms beyond your home department.  Second, it will provide foundational training in methods that are relatively new to this field and which home institutions often cannot provide.

SSG website: https://www.gold.ac.uk/media-communications/research/screen-studies-group/

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Screen Studies Group: Screen and Film Research Methods Today – 17 November

Screen Studies Group

Screen and Film Research Methods Today

Saturday 17 November

Venue: Safra Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, Strand Campus, King’s College London

Screen and Film Research Methods Today relaunches the Screen Studies Group annual postgraduate training day.  The day has two major goals.  The first is to bring together all new film and screen studies doctoral students in London and the environs. It will enable network building around shared specialisms beyond your home department.  Second, it will provide foundational training in methods that are relatively new to this field and which home institutions often cannot provide.  

 This is a one-day session presenting research methods for all new doctoral students. We will address a variety of topics that now concern Screen and Film Studies such as online research, dating mining, social media; live television; installation work; music videos, gaming, AV/PhDs, Production cultures, media industries, creative practice, and live cinema.  The day include a panel on archives available for under researched or previously excluded cinemas and communities.

The Event is funded by LAHP And CHASE, but all post-graduate students are welcome.

Free. Registration Required: https://www.chase.ac.uk/screen-studies-group/

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Apply Now: CHASE – ‘Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The Material Cultures of Postcolonial History’ deadline 15 October 2018

INTERNAL COMPETITION FOR CHASE PHD PROGRAMME:

‘Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The Material Cultures of Postcolonial History’

We have 1 place reserved for a Birkbeck PhD student on a fully funded CHASE

doctoral training programme entitled ‘Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The

Material Cultures of Postcolonial History’.

This is a series of six workshops across the year which explore global, transnational and postcolonial pasts by engaging with material collections and texts or objects in museums and exhibition spaces across London, as well as training in creating vlogs and media projects. For full details see below.

Travel costs, participation costs and refreshments are all included and funded by CHASE.

To apply for this programme, please send the following to Kat Hill by Monday October 15th (midnight). (katherine.hill@bbk.ac.uk)

  • 1000word statement explaining why you would be a suitable candidate and how it will enhance your research.
  • Short supporting statement from your supervisor
  • Personal Information required:
    • Name
    • Email
    • Programme of Study
    • Department
    • Year of PhD
    • Title/Area of Research
    • Supervisor

Objects in Space, Subjects in Time: The Material Cultures of Postcolonial

History

Kat Hill and Rebecca Darley (History, Classics and Archaeology – Birkbeck)

Suzanna Ivanic (Kent)

Luke Lavan (Kent)

Liz James (Sussex)

A series of six workshops across the year which explore global, transnational and postcolonial pasts by engaging with material collections and texts or objects in museums and exhibition spaces across London. The journeys of objects or the changing shape and use of spaces can offer a powerful means of unpicking, understanding and then conveying meaningfully and compellingly to a range of audiences the processes and legacies of empires. Encountering the objects and spaces proposed in these workshops emphasizes not only the intellectual perspectives of post-colonial theory upon the past, but also brings to light in the most concrete terms those shadows of empire in the present that post-colonial theory was developed to expose and challenge.

These workshops will include one international conference, four object-based sessions making use of London’s unparalleled collections, and two sessions dedicated to the processes of translating research into different arenas. You will have the chance to examine a range of material and objects in dedicated study sessions with curators and experts, and over the course of the series, you will produce a video, blogpost or other public-facing reflection, drawing on your own research and the materials in these workshops. You will receive training from the Derek Jarman Lab, Birkbeck’s media department, on how to produce an effective media project and have the opportunity to contribute to a podcast with a top broadcaster, as well as present your ideas on the sessions to a non-academic audience.

The focus in all of the workshops will, therefore, be on the complex material histories of empires, as vehicles for migration, trade, translation and the imposition of political authority, and simultaneously on developing a constant awareness of the sub-structures of knowledge creation that underpin any approach to the past. They will combine to give you fresh ways to think with objects and to challenge categories and ideologies of colonialism, not only as they were historically constructed, but also as they continue to shape the world today.

Places are limited. Registration will be open soon via the CHASE website.

For any questions please contact Kat Hill (katherine.hill@bbk.ac.uk) or Rebecca Darley (r.darley@bbk.ac.uk)

What will you get from these sessions?

  • Engage with materiality and object-based history
  • Engage with diachronic global and transnational histories
  • Think about place and space as historical concepts
  • Develop presentation and public engagement skills
  • Broaden knowledge of heritage spaces and public museums
  • Network with other researchers, senior scholars and other stakeholders

What’s included?

  • All the sessions, time and resources
  • Lunch and refreshments for each day
  • Travel to and from the workshops
  • Overnight accommodation if coming outside London for session 1 (Conference and Mithraeum)
  • Payment for 2 students to tweet and blog about the Late Antique Archaeology conference

 Indicative Programme (all are full day events)

Workshop 1: November 30 and December 1 2018: Tour of the Mithraeum and Archaeology Conference

  • Opportunity to attend the Late Antique Archaeology (this is not compulsory)
  • Tour of the Mithraeum site
  • Discussion with a researcher who has worked with the Mithraeum of the moveable objects found within the site and the decision to house these in the Museum of London
  • Panel discussion on the role of Bloomberg in the conservation and future of the Mithraeum site

Workshop 2: January 2019: Training with the Derek Jarman Lab

  • Training session on vlogs, blogs and media

 Workshop 3: February 2019: The British Library

  • Tour of the map room of the British Library
  • Discussion with a researcher working on the British Library collections and on maps of the Middle East in particular
  • Opportunity to see and spend time examining, collectively and in small groups, a sequence of maps showing the Middle East and to discuss their changing representations of this space

Workshop 4: March 2019: The British Museum

  • Tour of the Waddesdon Bequest, the Renaissance treasures (and some fakes) collected by Baron Rothschild
  • Discussion with a researcher working on the Renaissance collections at the British Museum about the origin and nature of this collection, in relation to the wider Renaissance holdings of the museum
  • Opportunity to see and spend time examining, collectively and in small groups, a selection of objects in the Waddesdon Bequest, chosen to reflect contested, disruptive or hidden histories of colonialism.

                                                                      

Workshop 5: May 2019: The V and A

  • Tour of the photographic archive of the V&A examining material from the nineteenth century, such as Creswell photographs of Syria, Palestine, and Cairo, albums of missions and expeditions to Pacific Islands, and records of hierarchies in India
  • Discussion with a researcher working on the digitization of the photographic archive
  • Opportunity to see and spend time examining, collectively and in small groups, images from the Tripe collection. To investigate the unique nature of photographs as documentary sources constructed out of intentional and unintentional preserved elements, and the value of this in developing new narratives of past spaces.

Workshop 6: June 2019: Westminster Kingsway College

  • presentation of blogpost/video-post (to a group of students from Westminster Kingsway College, a sixth-form college in partnership with Birkbeck and a panel discussion to include Nigel Warburton (Philosophy Bites and AEON magazine founder) and Dr. Charlotte Joy (lecturer in anthropology at Goldsmiths and curator of the Horniman Museum)

 

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From Field to Page: Core Skills in the Medical Humanities 5 July and 8 November 2018

From Field to Page: Core Skills in the Medical Humanities 

CHASE Cohort Training Days

July 5th & November 8th 2018

Keynes Library

School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Medical humanities continues to emerge as a live and transforming field of enquiry.  The core work of this field seeks to explore and critique biomedical science and its histories through the various critical frameworks of the humanities disciplines.  Medical humanities research presents scholars with the particular challenges of transdisciplinary research undertaken across the radically different domains of medicine and the humanities’ academic disciplines.  Across the CHASE institutions there is a diverse cohort of medical humanities doctoral researchers that incorporates students from both clinical and non-clinical, humanities backgrounds. As such the cohort represents a broad range of skills-sets, work, academic and training experiences, and previous exposure to the critical methods central to the humanities disciplines. Clinicians come into the field of research with substantial situated knowledge of the real-life settings and practices of medicine and surgery but often with the need to acquire, through training the requisite skills of critical thinking and writing.  Conversely, non-clinicians and humanities’ scholars are much better versed in critical practice and inquiry, but lack the grounded, lived experience of clinical practice. The range of research projects undertaken in the field is markedly diverse, ranging from practice-led (examining the nature of clinical practice), to practice-based (using clinical practice as research), to purely analytic (discursive analysis) modes of inquiry but all undertake to situate medicine, disease, patient experience, clinical practice and medical education within socio-cultural and/or historical contexts in such a way that critical analysis and discursive understandings may be produced. The aims of medical humanities theses may, or may not, have the avowed intention of contributing to the practical fields of clinical practice, delivery of healthcare or medical education. All medical humanities theses must adhere to the core methodologies and practices of the humanities disciplines and this means that critical thinking and writing skills are key requirements of the medical humanities doctorate.

The CHASE Consortium will deliver two training days, which map the core skills required of medical humanities doctoral research and support doctoral researchers as they undertake their projects.

Registration for both days is free and open to all PhD students at CHASE institutions.

There are 10 travel bursaries available for students without CHASE funding, these will be awarded on a first come, first served basis.

To register, please contact Jo Winning, j.winning@bbk.ac.uk by 25th June 2018

Programme

Day 1, July 5tth 2018

10.15-10.30am:  Coffee and Registration

10.30-11.15am:  Keynote Lecture 1: Mapping the field (Jo Winning, Birkbeck)

11.15am-12.30pm:  The challenges of transdisciplinarity and the problems of language (Birkbeck/Wellcome ISSF Medical Humanities Fellows)

12.30-1.30pm:  Lunch

13.30-2.30pm:  Open Space to discuss the morning sessions

2.30-3.45pm:  Working with stakeholders: public engagement and impact (Ross Macfarlane, Wellcome; Deborah Padfield, St George’s Medical School; Wendy Earle, Birkbeck Impact Officer)

3.45pm-4pm:  Coffee

4-5.15pm:  Breakout group sessions to discuss intersections of the sessions with individual research projects

5.30pm:  Happy 70th Birthday NHS, Drinks Reception, followed by evening tour of the Wellcome Collection

 

Day 2, November 8th 2018

10.15-10.30am:  Coffee and Registration

10.30-11.15am:  Keynote Lecture 2: From academy to clinic, and back again (tbc)

11.15am-12.30pm:  Medical Humanities and Ethics (tbc)

12.30-1.30pm:  Lunch

13.30-2.30pm:  Open Space to discuss the morning sessions

2.30-3.45pm:  Putting theory into practice: medical humanities as practice-based research (tbc)

3.45pm-4pm:  Coffee

4-5.15pm:  Breakout group sessions to discuss intersections of the sessions with individual research projects

5.30pm:  Panel discussion and Drinks Reception, hosted by Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities

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Free Training: Migrating Texts: Innovation and Technology in Subtitling, Translation and Adaptation

Migrating Texts: Innovation and Technology in Subtitling, Translation and Adaptation

Friday 4 May 2018 | IMLR, Room 243, Senate House, London WC1E 7HU

***Free training generously supported by LAHP (London Arts & Humanities Partnership), the European Commission and IMLR (The Institute of Modern Languages Research)***

Please join us for our next Migrating Texts event, aimed specifically at postgraduate students and ECRs researching in the Modern Languages and Arts and Humanities, and to practitioners in these fields. Migrating Texts brings together academic speakers with individuals from the subtitling, translation and cross-media industries, with the aim of fostering communication between the two and promoting opportunities for collaboration between academia and the cultural industries. Our forthcoming event will focus on innovation and technology.

In the last decades, advances in digital communications and innovative technologies have deeply transformed the way texts are created and travel across material, linguistic, spatial and temporal boundaries. This is particularly evident in the everchanging landscape of the audiovisual translation (AVT) sector, but translation practices in publishing and theatre, for example, have also been affected. What tools were available to translation practitioners before the digital revolution? What can we learn from the transition from analogue to digital production? How has online software reformed translators’ access to work and their modus operandi? How has the job market adapted to the demand for a new profile of translator who is at the same time a language-cultural expert and tech-savvy? What new forms of adaptation are available today?

The subtitling session will explore advances in subtitling practice from a diachronic perspective. It will first discuss the origins and nature of written language on screen and the key role played by early, often non-professional, translators in the international circulation of moving images. It will then observe more recent technical developments in both textual and professional practice, underlining issues surrounding quality standards and access to the job market.

The translation and adaptation session will explore changes to reading, writing and publishing occasioned by technological innovation, from the ways we do translation (e.g. computer-aided translation methods) to the ways translations and adaptations are disseminated (e.g. digital storytelling platforms). The session concludes with a practical exercise where attendees will adapt a text for a digital storytelling platform.

For more information on the speakers, please see the Migrating Texts website:

https://migratingtexts.wordpress.com/about-the-speakers/

Attendance is free. You may register your place through the IMLR website:

https://modernlanguages.sas.ac.uk/events/event/14045

We look forward to seeing you there!

The Migrating Texts team: Carla, Katie, Kit

Website: migratingtexts.wordpress.com

Twitter: @MigratingTexts | Facebook: migratingtexts | Email: migratingtexts@gmail.com

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Derek Jarman Lab – Essay Film Course 20 – 23 January 2018

Essay Film Course

An intensive 4-day course in all aspects of audiovisual production related to essayistic and research-led filmmaking. Students work in small groups and learn how to use widely available DSLR cameras and popular editing software to create professional looking and intellectually engaging videos. At the end of the course they complete a short training film. This gives them an opportunity to put their new skills to use immediately and experiment with the form of the essay film in a stimulating environment and with the support of the Lab’s team. Key elements of the course are: introduction to film theory, session on making an impact with research, tips on production management, hands-on skills in lighting set-ups, recording sound, and using cameras (Canon and Panasonic DSLRs, Blackmagic Cinema Camera), a supervised location shoot, editing theory and editing on Final Cut X.

Our courses are designed to cater for a variety of levels of experience and to consider the different ways in which moving images can be used. An integral part of the training is discussing students’ research interests and how to make the best use of film in an academic context. We explore the conventions of documentary filmmaking but also talk about its alternatives, such as the essay film. The focus of this course is on films which combine an artistic form with an argumentative structure. We also engage with the concepts of visual methods of disseminating and conducting research in the humanities and social sciences.

The sessions take place in our offices:

The Derek Jarman Lab
36 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The training begins at 10am on each day of the 4-day course, and we aim to finish around 6pm.

The cost of the course for Birkbeck students and staff is £300.

If you are interested in enrolling, please send an email to bartek@jarmanlab.org

More information about the lab can be found here: jarmanlab.org.

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Derek Jarman Lab – Essay Film Course: 10-13 November 2017

For all those interested in using film in their research, the Derek Jarman Lab offers a short course in essayistic filmmaking. The dates are 10th – 13th November.

Essay Film Course

An intensive 4-day course in all aspects of audiovisual production related to essayistic and research-led filmmaking. Students work in small groups and learn how to use widely available DSLR cameras and popular editing software to create professional looking and intellectually engaging videos. At the end of the course they complete a short training film. This gives them an opportunity to put their new skills to use immediately and experiment with the form of the essay film in a stimulating environment and with the support of the Lab’s team. Key elements of the course are:

  • introduction to film theory,
  • session on making an impact with research,
  • tips on production management,
  • hands-on skills in lighting set-ups,
  • recording sound,
  • using cameras (Canon and Panasonic DSLRs, Blackmagic Cinema Camera),
  • a supervised location shoot,
  • editing theory
  • editing on Adobe Premiere Pro.

Courses are designed to cater for a variety of levels of experience and to consider the different ways in which moving images can be used. An integral part of the training is discussing students’ research interests and how to make the best use of film in an academic context. We explore the conventions of documentary film making but also talk about its alternatives, such as the essay film. The focus of this course is on films which combine an artistic form with an argumentative structure. We also engage with the concepts of visual methods of disseminating and conducting research in the humanities and social sciences.

The sessions take place in our offices:

The Derek Jarman Lab
36 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The training begins at 10am on each day of the 4-day course, and we aim to finish around 6pm.

The cost of the course for Birkbeck students and staff is £300.

If you are interested in enrolling, please send an email to bartek@jarmanlab.org

More information about the lab can be found here: jarmanlab.org.

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Derek Jarman Lab – Working with Subtitles Workshop – 3 May 2017

The Derek Jarman Lab is running a practical workshop on working with subtitles for researchers who might want to add subtitles to films for teaching purposes. Adding subtitles to a film is in many ways a simple task, but it can quickly become fiddly and frustrating. The Lab will run through a few basic approaches to this problem and then suggest a simple workflow for researchers to use in approaching this task.

The main body of the workshop will run on Wednesday 3 May from 10:00 – 13:00 at the Derek Jarman Lab, 36 Gordon Square. The Lab will remain open in the afternoon for those who would like to stay on and work on a particular film with support from Lab staff. However, if you would like to do this, please do get in touch to let us know about what sorts of video files  you will be working with, and also so we can assess numbers.

THERE ARE 4 PLACES FOR THIS WORKSHOP AND THEY WILL BE ALLOCATED ON A FIRST-COME FIRST-SERVED BASIS. IF INTERESTED PLEASE CONTACT EDMUND BOLGER AT THE DEREK JARMAN LAB: edmund@jarmanlab.org

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Derek Jarman Lab – Essay Film Course 22-25 April 2017

For all those who are interested in using film in their research, the Derek Jarman Lab is offering a course in essayistic filmmaking at the beginning of the summer term.

The dates are: 22nd and 23rd April for filming and production sessions, and 24th and 25th April for an editing workshop. Here is a short description of the course:

Essay Film Course

An intensive 4-day course in all aspects of audiovisual production related to essayistic and research-led filmmaking. Students work in small groups and learn how to use widely available DSLR cameras and popular editing software to create professional looking and intellectually engaging videos. At the end of the course they complete a short training film. This gives them an opportunity to put their new skills to use immediately and experiment with the form of the essay film in a stimulating environment and with the support of the Lab’s team. Key elements of the course are: introduction to film theory, session on making an impact with research, tips on production management, hands-on skills in lighting set-ups, recording sound, and using cameras (Canon and Panasonic DSLRs, Blackmagic Cinema Camera), a supervised location shoot, editing theory and editing on Adobe Premiere Pro.

Jarman Lab courses are designed to cater for a variety of levels of experience and to consider the different ways in which moving images can be used. An integral part of the training is discussing students’ research interests and how to make the best use of film in an academic context. We explore the conventions of documentary filmmaking but also talk about its alternatives, such as the essay film. The focus of this course is on films which combine an artistic form with an argumentative structure. We also engage with the concepts of visual methods of disseminating and conducting research in the humanities and social sciences.

The sessions take place in our offices:

The Derek Jarman Lab
36 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The training begins at 10am on each day of the 4-day course, and we aim to finish around 6pm.

The cost of the course for Birkbeck students and staff is £300.

If you are interested in enrolling, please send an email to bartek@jarmanlab.org

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