CFP: Eight Early Modern Symposium – The Courtauld Institute deadline 31 August 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – SUBMIT BY 31 AUGUST 2018

In recent years, a renewed interest in Early Modern rituals, festivals, and performances has prompted a reconsideration of ceremonious processions with a particular focus on their impact on social, cultural, artistic and political structures and practices. Simultaneously, scholars have increasingly acknowledged the mobility of Early Modern artists across geographical, religious and cultural borders. Although processions were witnessed by natives and visitors alike and were therefore prime instances of cross-cultural encounters, their depictions by artists both local and foreign remain a lesser-studied body of visual material. This symposium proposes to explore the visual representations of processions that took place within cross-cultural encounters both within and outside of Europe.

A procession was an act of movement that was particularly charged with meaning; an ambulatory mode of celebration, it had a global resonance in the Early Modern period. Processionals impressed foreign dignitaries, established modes of rule, communicated traditions and negotiated power balances and were highly sensory occasions – as such they lent themselves readily to visual representation and were enthusiastically recorded in literature. Pageantries, military processions and Joyous Entries (Blijde Inkomsten) were recorded in a variety of media, as exemplified by the festival books celebrating the ephemeral constructions orchestrated for Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand’s arrival in Antwerp (1635) or the eighteenth-century paintings depicting Venice’s dazzling boat parades in honour of foreign dignitaries. Furthermore, ceremonial processions conceived for births, weddings, circumcision feasts and funerals occasioned visual representations such as the colourful Mughal miniature Wedding Procession of Dara Shikoh in presence of Shah Jahan (1740). In addition, the notion of procession can be expanded to encompass various expressions of mobility that could be understood and were often depicted as a procession. Both Jan van Scorel’s frieze-like painting of the knightly brotherhood commemorating their Holy Land pilgrimage (c. 1530) and the depiction of ambassadors travelling with their retinue to foreign courts and cities can be perceived as a form of procession. Thus, the structure of a procession was increasingly adopted in the Early Modern period to depict moments of exchange and motion propelled by the quest for knowledge, as much as diplomatic concerns and religious piety. Well-known examples include The Voyage to Calicuttapestry series (1504) as well as the highly detailed printed frieze of a merchant endeavour by Hans Burgkmair (The King of Cochin, 1508).

We welcome proposals for papers that engage with processions in the Early Modern period (c. 1500-1800) in the context of cross-cultural encounters, with the locations of cross-cultural interaction defined here as both inter or extra-European and beyond the “East meets West” dynamic. Participants are invited to explore artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary divides, and to examine drawings, prints, alba amicorum, painting, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture, and the intersections between them. Contributions from other disciplines, such as the history of science and conservation, are welcome. We invite 20-minute papers that explore, but are not limited to, the following questions:

  • How is the format of the procession used to structure visual representations of Early Modern ceremonial occasions and cultural difference?
  • How were processions perceived visually both by local and foreign artists?
  • Moreover, what audiences were interested in these visual representations and what scope did such a broad and diverse range of visual material serve? It is widely acknowledged, for instance, that Festival Books were not only designed for the audience of the spectacle, but also for armchair readers who could thus experience the procession as if they had been present.
  • In what way does the visual representation of a procession signify a means of negotiating between one’s own identity, heritage and outlook whilst in dialogue with another culture?
  • How did diplomatic encounters encourage the production of procession scenes both during and after the diplomatic mission, such as the depiction of gift-giving ceremonies? We strongly encourage speakers to also consider less conventional modes of processions. Could, for instance, the sequential depiction of costumes in costume albums also be interpreted as a procession of some sorts?
  • Through which visual strategies and spatial arrangements did the ephemeral decorations and arches erected on the occasion of glorious entries orchestrate a procession through the urban space, or thematise the idea of cross-cultural encounter?
  • What are the effects (both ephemeral and lasting) of these processions that sometimes involve the construction of specific architectural constructions and temporary settings (e.g. the Field of the Cloth of Gold, 1520)?

The Early Modern Symposium offers an opportunity for research students from universities both in the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. We invite proposals from graduate students, early career researchers, conservators, and curators. Talks that draw upon technical analysis and other theoretical approaches are equally welcome.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a short biography by 31 August 2018 to:

talitha.schepers@courtauld.ac.uk and alice.zamboni@courtauld.ac.uk

The aim of this postgraduate symposium is to provide a platform for Early Career Researchers and postgraduate students to share their research with peers. We may be able to provide a subsidy for travel and accommodation costs, but please be aware that this may not cover all of your expenses. We prioritise candidates from the UK and Europe. We will notify successful applicants by Monday 10 September 2018.

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CFP: Frankenstein Unbound – deadline Monday 18th June 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Arts University Bournemouth

Frankenstein Unbound: An Interdisciplinary Conference Exploring Mary Shelley and Gothic Legacies

Dates: Wednesday 31 October and Thursday 1 November 2018

Venues: Conference – St Peter’s Church, Bournemouth

Keynote Speakers:

Sir Christopher Frayling, Chancellor, Arts University Bournemouth

Professor Elaine Graham, University of Chester

Professor Sir Peter Cook, CRAB Studios (TBC)

In 1849, Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley’s heart were brought to the graveyard of St. Peter’s Church in Bournemouth, where they were buried with the remains of Mary Shelley’s parents Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin.

In 2018, Arts University Bournemouth and St. Peter’s Church, in association with Bournemouth University, celebrate the bicentenary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s most famous work Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (1818) as part of the Shelley Frankenstein Festival. The academic conference, located at this unique venue, will offer new and re-situated perspectives on Mary Shelley and her writings, her family and circle, and her most famous work.  We are pleased to acknowledge colleagues at Bournemouth University for their organisational support.

We invite papers and presentations themed around, but not limited to, the following:

  • Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, and the Romantics
  • Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley
  • Mary Shelley beyond Frankenstein
  • The Shelley family: history and legacy
  • Monstrous Romantics
  • Frankenstein and the sea
  • Theology and Frankenstein
  • Frankenstein and philosophy
  • Frankenstein at home and abroad
  • Adaptations and afterlives
  • Frankenstein and medical humanities
  • The abject and the sublime
  • Frankenstein and emotion
  • Guilt and crime in Frankenstein
  • Interpretations of Frankenstein in the creative industries (Film, Art, Theatre, Dance, Writing etc)
  • Mary Shelley and Gothic legacies
  • Gothic architecture
  • The Gothic imagination

We welcome proposals for themed panel sessions (maximum three papers), individual twenty-minute presentations, or creative submissions from practitioners and scholars of all fields. We particularly encourage submissions from post-graduate students and Early Career Researchers. Please submit an abstract (300 words) and short biography (100 words) to frankensteinunboundconference@gmail.com by Monday 18th June 2018.

For more information and updates visit our website: https://frankensteinunbound.wordpress.com/

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CFP Action: Arrest – Performance, protest, and the law deadline 11 June 2018

Action: Arrest 

Performance, protest, and the law

A one-day symposium

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Doyle (University of California, Riverside)

Join us in exploring the role of action and arrest in protest, law, and performance. Taking place during the year of the Suffragette centenary, the fifty-year anniversary of the Paris ‘68 uprisings, and a period of burgeoning civil unrest and political uncertainty in the UK and worldwide, Action: Arrest looks to assess and reassess the relationship between performance, protest, and the law. Inspired by their compelling dualities, the symposium aims to open up a new set of questions that may further complicate the relationship between these terms.

Recent and ongoing people-led political movements – for example, the March for Our Lives against current US gun laws, Yarl’s Wood #HungerForFreedom hunger strikes and #Stansted15 activists fighting against inhumane detention in the UK, and global campaigns to fight gendered and sexual violence with #MeToo and #TimesUp – contribute to the sense that we are in a moment of global action, where national and international uprisings are opening up new alternatives for social and political futures. At the same time, disparities in media representation, state reactions, and police response to different forms of activism expose tensions between the hope for positive change and forward momentum and the recreation and reinforcement of existing oppressions and dynamics of power. This conference asks where performance intervenes in these tensions, examining the value of reading protest as performance, particularly as it intersects with the law and disciplinary structures of power. Grounding itself in the current political moment, we hope the conference will provide an opportunity to engage with current and historical protest in its varying forms and varying spaces – the street, the theatre, the courtroom, and the gallery, amongst others – to analyse the relationship between performance, protest, and the law.

Interdisciplinary in its aims, Action: Arrest draws together academics, artists and practitioners from varying disciplines and their intersections. Honouring the constitutive links between methodologies, content, and form, Action: Arrest resists the cloistering control of academic tradition and discipline and encourages diversity, collaboration, and dissent. We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers, 10-minute provocations, and collaborative and performative papers. We are also very open to suggestions for alternative formats or styles of presentation not listed here.

Proposals for contributions that bear directly on one or more of the above themes are welcome. These might address:

  • Explorations of action and arrest as bodily and affective, and considerations of how they define different bodies.
  • Racialised, gendered and sexualised bodies in performance, protest and arrest.
  • Thinking through the relationship between movement, action, arrest, and stillness, and their relationship to political uprisings and the law.
  • How does action catalyse change, and how is action used as a means of control?
  • Affect as protest, the body protesting itself through exhaustion, fatigue, boredom, irritation, sweat, and excitement.
  • (Non)/Spectacular violence and protest.
  • Protest in and outside the museum, gallery and/or institutional setting (e.g. WHEREISANAMENDIETA, Liberate Tate etc).
  • Protest as the duality and contradictions of arrest as a control of bodies, and as a protection of bodies.
  • Explorations of restorative and transformative justice, penal reform, and abolitionism.
  • The influence of legal structures and policies on recent or historical actions and protests, with particular focus on how this has been used as a regulatory and disciplinary tool.
  • Protest, legal action, and minoritarian feminisms.
  • Resistance to repressive politics through action, arrest, stillness and movement.
  • Considerations of police behaviour, civil unrest, and dissonance. Moments of action and stillness between dissenters and those attempting to exert state control. (e.g. riot police and protesters, state or police interventions in performance works).
  • The relationship between arrest as being taken into legal custody, and arrest as inaction or stillness.
  • The capitulation of radicalism under neoliberal/late capitalist regimes.
  • Languages of visual activism.

Please send 250 word abstracts and 100 word bios and/or artist statements to actionarrest@gmail.com by the 11th of June 2018.

Bryony White and Savannah Whaley

King’s College London

www.actionarrest.wordpress.com

Kindly supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership

 

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CFP: DISTRACTION Birkbeck Institute for Social Research Graduate Conference – deadline 7 May 2018

The Call for Papers for the BISR annual graduate conference has been extended! The theme this year is DISTRACTION.

This conference aims to involve PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines and institutions. It is funded by the Birkbeck Institutes of Social ResearchGender and Sexuality, and Humanities

Dates: 8-9 June 2018

NEW DEADLINE: 7th May 2018. Please send 200 word abstracts and 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk. If you are also interested in taking part in the running of the event such as chairing a panel, please get in touch via this email.

We are delighted to confirm Prof. Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford) and Dr. Sophie Jones (Birkbeck, English) as our keynote speakers.

 

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/fellows-and-academic-staff/d/carolin-duttlinger

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/sophie-jones

 

Full details: http://bit.ly/2hCcxuq

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Call for Papers: *DICKENS DAY* – deadline: 31st May 2018

*DICKENS DAY*

Saturday 20th October 2018, Senate House, London.

CFP: Dickens, Families and Communities

Dickens often associated his own works with a cheerful ideology of hearth and home. Writing to his friend John Forster on plans for a new periodical, he promised that it would have ‘a vein of glowing, hearty, generous, mirthful, beaming reference in everything to Home, and Fireside’. Yet, many of the families in Dickens’s fiction are far from mirthful. From Mrs Joe going on the rampage to the murderous Jonas Chuzzlewit, the Dickensian family is as conflict-ridden as it is cosy. And, for Dickens, family is a particularly flexible concept, ranging from the nuclear to the extended, encompassing elective families, diverse gender roles, child-carers and surrogate-parents. Dickens’s writing is frequently concerned also with those without families: orphans, singletons, and those alienated from others by choice or circumstance.

Dickens’s wider communities are equally eclectic. In prefaces and journalism, he makes appeals to his ‘community of readers’, a virtual community linked through his writings. He participated in other more tangible communities, as an author, journalist, social reformer, and actor in amateur dramatic performances. And he wrote of diverse forms of community: gangs, clubs, the parish, the nation, and religious, political and cultural societies.

Jointly run by Birkbeck, Cardiff University, the Dickens Fellowship and the Institute of English Studies, this one-day conference will explore all aspects of Dickens, Families and Communities. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in response to the theme and warmly encourage Dickensians and scholars of all backgrounds and career stages to apply.

Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Hearth and home: happy families
  • Threats to and within the family
  • Alienated from the family: illegitimacy, orphans, solitary individuals
  • Adoptive and elective families
  • Dickens’s own family
  • Dickens’s community of readers
  • Nation, empire and other imagined communities
  • Institutional communities: orphanages, schools, prisons, workhouses, parliament and the courts
  • Criminal and transgressive families
  • Privileged and underprivileged communities
  • Clubs, societies, lodgers, friends, neighbours and other networks
  • Amateur dramatics, fictional and non-fictional theatrical communities

Please send proposals (maximum 500 words) to Bethan Carney (bethan.carney@gmail.com), Holly Furneaux (furneauxh@cardiff.ac.uk) and Ben Winyard (benwinyard@hotmail.com).

The deadline for paper proposals is 31st May 2018.

 

 

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CFP: Representing Gender in the North: 1945 to the present day – Deadline 3 April 2018

The University of Sheffield 23.5.18

Call for Papers

“When he saw this Tom was so full of himself that he had to share the pleasure with somebody, so he turned to a woman sitting across the aisle.

“There it is, missus.”

Surprised, the woman looked across him at him.

“You what, love?”

Tom nodded towards the panorama through the front window.

“The North.”

The woman looked, saw nothing, then observing that they were alone

thought it best to humour him.

“Yes, love. Very nice.”

And she stood up and went downstairs.”

Barry Hines, First Signs, (London: Michael Joseph, 1972), p.89

“Representing Gender in the North: 1945 to the present day” is a one-day conference which is to be held at the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield on 23 May 2018.  The conference focuses on prose, poetry, film, theatre, and television.   Contributions are warmly welcomed from established scholars and post-graduate students alike.  We invite abstracts of 300 words (please send to rlhughes@shef.ac.uk)  by 3 April 2018. Topics for discussion include but are not limited to the following:

Representations of gender in the town or in the country

Ethnicity in the North

Northern authorship

LGBTQ representations

The post-industrial

Displacement and/or the returning native

Class

The teenager or the Bildungsroman

Stereotypes/stereotyping

Dialect and gender

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CFP: ASMI POSTGRADUATE SUMMER SCHOOL – Deadline 9 April 2018

University of Warwick

21 – 22 June, 2018

The ASMI Postgraduate Summer School provides a forum for postgraduate students and early career scholars in the field of Italian Studies to share their research and test their ideas.

We welcome proposals for papers on any aspect of Modern Italian history, politics, society and culture, from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century and from any academic discipline.

Participants will present their papers in panel sessions and then receive feedback from senior scholars and junior colleagues in a welcoming and supportive environment.

Papers can be in English or Italian and should be no more than 20 minutes in length.
Please send an abstract (max 250 words) and a short biography (max 100 words) to the conference organisers at asmi.summerschool.2018@gmail.com by Monday 9th April 2018.
The Summer School programme will include two keynote lectures and a training session (speakers to be confirmed).

The Summer School is free to all members of ASMI. ASMI membership is offered at a discounted rate of £20 per calendar year to students and the unwaged, and includes subscription to the journal Modern Italy (http://www.asmi.org.uk/membership/).

A limited number of travel grants will be available. For information, please contact the organisers at asmi.summerschool.2018@gmail.com
The organising committee: Gianmarco Mancosu (University of Warwick), Daniela Zanini (School of Advanced Study, University of London), Emiliano Zappalà (University of Warwick), Kate Devine (Royal Holloway, University of London).

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CFP: Spain: Social Movements Between Past and Present – Deadline 23 March 2018

University of Cambridge

8th June 2018

Social movements in Spain have increasingly attracted academic and popular attention over the last years. Political mobilisations are frequently treated as spontaneous phenomena, divorced from their wider social and historical contexts, as testified by much of the recent commentary on the 15M/Indignados movement and recent Catalan separatism. There is little interaction between those studying activism in the transformative decades of la transición española and those researching contemporary social movements. This can mean that their lessons and wider significance are lost. Historians of popular politics are also often reluctant to relate their research to contemporary events or to acknowledge the influence of present movements on the collective and academic memory. Our workshop is partly a response to social movement theorists’ suggestion that we attend to a particular mobilisation´s temporal, spatial and transnational dynamics to gain a deeper understanding of the movement itself and the societal changes it sheds light on.

This workshop will allow participants – PhD students and early-career academics – to reflect on social movements in Spain from the mid-twentieth century to the present, linking between past and present in important themes of mobilisation in contemporary Spain. It will help lay the ground for dialogue between scholars of Spanish history and politics from a diverse array of disciplines and intellectual contexts. Speakers will have twenty minutes to present their paper followed by comments and questions lead by an established academic. We will proceed with a roundtable discussion.

We aim to facilitate discussion on a variety of topics related to Spanish social movements, including but not limited to:

  • Gender and sexuality
  • Relations between social movements and institutions
  • Nationalisms
  • Urban Infrastructure
  • Youth Activism
  • Student movement
  • Memory
  • Labour and trade unions
  • Relations between actors
  • Movements and political parties

How to apply: Please send abstracts of up to 250 words and a short biography (max.200 words) to Roseanna Webster (rw561@cam.ac.uk) and/or Tiago Carvalho (tmlc3@cam.ac.uk) by March 23rd, 2018.

 

Limited funding to cover travel and accommodation is available.

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Deadline Extension CFP: Dandelion Journal: Submissions Deadline 5 March 2018

For its forthcoming volume, Dandelion, the Postgraduate Arts Journal at Birkbeck, has a new Call for Papers on the theme of

b r e a t h i n g.

Deadline Extension Details

The DEADLINE for COMPLETED SUBMISSIONS is 5 March 2018.

We would be happy to discuss ideas for submissions with interested authors prior to the submission deadline.

In its compelling role of binding the human being to life and nature, the figurative meaning of b r e a t h i n g  is endowed with transitive qualities. Inspired by a multicultural approach to wellbeing, the notion of breathing effects a plurality of approaches to ways in which meanings are generated.

B r e a t h i n g  is endowed with transformative qualities. While this theme immediately speaks to us about the air we breathe, the polluted environments we inhabit, and the changing climate we confront daily, it injects new life into ideas related to embodied worlds – be these experimental narratives, interactive media, expanded cinemas, poetic forms, and voice-works – among others. In forging interconnections amongst disparate and discrete, yet whole entities,  b r e a t h i n g  inspires our imaginary and appeals to the human sensorium.

In these ways, it promotes the union of the physical to the metaphysical; it raises questions of shifting spatiotemporal boundaries, and of partial erosion of the empirical constraints that we may experience as digital beings; yet, it also sheds new light on thinking about those constraints in liminal and interstitial ways.

For its forthcoming issue, Dandelion seeks to invoke a meditative journey through the symbolic, metaphorical, and metonymical interpretations of  b r e a t h i n g .

Topics may be related, but are not limited, to:

  • Body/nature
  • Ecosystem ecology
  • The Anthropocene: media ecology
  • Interactivity and the digital entity
  • Ecofeminist philosophy
  • Desire: feminist perspectives on gender and sexual difference
  • Perceptual realism: the sense of smell
  • Linguistics
  • Cultural tropes in film and literary genres
  • The liminality of breathing: between cinema and art gallery
  • The moving image in video / installation art
  • The posthuman / postgender
  • Landscapes of the imaginary
  • Dreaming
  • The art of breathing in the age of globalisation
  • Soundscapes

Submission guidelines

We welcome long articles (of 5000-8000 words), or shorter ones (of 3000-5000 words).
We also welcome reviews of books, films, performances, exhibitions, and festivals (of around 1500 words).

We also publish interviews that you may wish to conduct with an author/artist, and artwork including visual art; creative writing; podcasts, and video footage (up to 10 minutes).

We would be happy to discuss ideas for submissions with interested authors prior to the submission deadline.

Please send all completed submissions to mail@dandelionjournal.org by 5th March 2018.

Please also include a 50-word author biography and a 200-300-word abstract alongside the submission of the entire article/piece. All referencing and style is required in full MHRA format as a condition of publication and submitted articles should be academically rigorous and ready for immediate publication.

We very much look forward to hearing from you!

With very best wishes,

Donatella Valente

Jennifer Turner

Editors

Dandelion

https://dandelionjournal.org/

mail@dandelionjournal.org

 

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