Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group events: Autumn 2019

Lecture: Thursday 17th October, 6-8pm

Professor Colin Jones, Queen Mary, University of London

‘The Duchesse d’Elbeuf and the Arts of Resistance in Paris under the Terror’

The Cinema, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PD

The recent discovery of a series of private letters to a friend (1788-94) from the wealthy dowager duchess of Elbeuf in the course of the French Revolution is the starting point for a broader discussion of how, in the period of censorship and surveillance under the Terror, individuals strove to maintain freedom of expression and develop a critique of government. The lecture will be followed by questions, and a glass of wine.

Colin Jones is Professor of History at Queen Mary, University of London. He has published widely on French cultural history, particularly on the eighteenth century, the French Revolution, and the history of medicine. His many books include The Medical World of Early Modern France (with Lawrence Brockliss, 1997), The Great Nation: France from Louis XV to Napoleon (2002), Paris: Biography of a City (2004: winner of the Enid MacLeod Prize) and The Smile Revolution in Eighteenth-Century Paris (2014).

All welcome! For more information, please contact Ann Lewis: a.lewis@bbk.ac.uk

Reading Group: Wednesday 13th November, 12-2pm

Hannah Lyons, Birkbeck, University of London, and the Victoria & Albert Museum

‘Some trifling performances’: Women Printmakers in the Long Eighteenth Century. Artists or Amateurs?

Room 106, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PD

Hannah Lyons is a Collaborative Doctoral Student, working on the role, status and output of amateur and professional women printmakers in Britain during the long eighteenth century. In this reading group, she will consider the problematic categories of the ‘amateur’ and ‘professional’ in the context of her research.

For more information, please contact Kate Retford: k.retford@bbk.ac.uk

Thursday 12th December, 3-5pm

English Country House symposium

co-organised with the Birkbeck Architecture, Space and Society Research Centre 

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PD

  • Professor Jon Stobart, Manchester Metropolitan University: ‘Home Comforts: Objects and Memories in the English country house, c.1750-1820’
  • Professor Abby van Slyck, Connecticut College, US: ‘Raising Royals: The Architecture of Childhood at Victoria and Albert’s Osborne House’
  • Professor Kate Retford, Birkbeck: ‘”A Family Home…not a Museum”: Marketing the English country house’

For more information, please contact Kate Retford: k.retford@bbk.ac.uk

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In-Jokes and outsiders: Considering internet memes as displaced performances’: GRiT (Graduate Research in Theatre) event. 8 May 2019

All are welcome to attend this year’s fourth and final GRiT (Graduate Research in Theatre) event. 

Film, Media and Cultural Studies doctoral student Hannah Barton’s talk ‘In-Jokes and outsiders: Considering internet memes as displaced performances’ will take place on Wednesday, 8 May  (4-5 pm) in Room 106 (43 Gordon Square). We look forward to seeing you there!

In-Jokes and outsiders: Considering internet memes as displaced performances’:

From LOLcats to Distracted Boyfriends, Galaxy Brain to SpongeBob, internet memes have been described as the lingua franca of social media. Commonly conceptualised as ephemeral visual (and sometimes aural) artefacts, memes tend to be ‘read’ in terms of form and content. However, memes are not simply proliferated artefacts; they are highly contextual and associative communicative events; shared as performances between creators and audiences, and mediated by technologies. As social and technological contexts iterate, so do the practices of meme production. Put otherwise, the experience of creating or encountering a meme can be markedly different from one week to the next. This dynamism poses interesting challenges for researchers. Can internet memes be comprehensively theorised once they become displaced from the technosocial conditions in which they were created? This seminar will discuss these points, and suggest that theoretical positions drawn from performance studies provide strategies for acknowledging – and where possible capturing – the technosocial context in which a meme was created and proliferated.

Hannah Barton is a doctoral student in Birkbeck’s Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies, where she is researching the cultural history of internet memes. She is also Digital Project Manager at Tate, and an occasional writer.

 

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CFP Action: Arrest – Performance, protest, and the law deadline 11 June 2018

Action: Arrest 

Performance, protest, and the law

A one-day symposium

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Doyle (University of California, Riverside)

Join us in exploring the role of action and arrest in protest, law, and performance. Taking place during the year of the Suffragette centenary, the fifty-year anniversary of the Paris ‘68 uprisings, and a period of burgeoning civil unrest and political uncertainty in the UK and worldwide, Action: Arrest looks to assess and reassess the relationship between performance, protest, and the law. Inspired by their compelling dualities, the symposium aims to open up a new set of questions that may further complicate the relationship between these terms.

Recent and ongoing people-led political movements – for example, the March for Our Lives against current US gun laws, Yarl’s Wood #HungerForFreedom hunger strikes and #Stansted15 activists fighting against inhumane detention in the UK, and global campaigns to fight gendered and sexual violence with #MeToo and #TimesUp – contribute to the sense that we are in a moment of global action, where national and international uprisings are opening up new alternatives for social and political futures. At the same time, disparities in media representation, state reactions, and police response to different forms of activism expose tensions between the hope for positive change and forward momentum and the recreation and reinforcement of existing oppressions and dynamics of power. This conference asks where performance intervenes in these tensions, examining the value of reading protest as performance, particularly as it intersects with the law and disciplinary structures of power. Grounding itself in the current political moment, we hope the conference will provide an opportunity to engage with current and historical protest in its varying forms and varying spaces – the street, the theatre, the courtroom, and the gallery, amongst others – to analyse the relationship between performance, protest, and the law.

Interdisciplinary in its aims, Action: Arrest draws together academics, artists and practitioners from varying disciplines and their intersections. Honouring the constitutive links between methodologies, content, and form, Action: Arrest resists the cloistering control of academic tradition and discipline and encourages diversity, collaboration, and dissent. We welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers, 10-minute provocations, and collaborative and performative papers. We are also very open to suggestions for alternative formats or styles of presentation not listed here.

Proposals for contributions that bear directly on one or more of the above themes are welcome. These might address:

  • Explorations of action and arrest as bodily and affective, and considerations of how they define different bodies.
  • Racialised, gendered and sexualised bodies in performance, protest and arrest.
  • Thinking through the relationship between movement, action, arrest, and stillness, and their relationship to political uprisings and the law.
  • How does action catalyse change, and how is action used as a means of control?
  • Affect as protest, the body protesting itself through exhaustion, fatigue, boredom, irritation, sweat, and excitement.
  • (Non)/Spectacular violence and protest.
  • Protest in and outside the museum, gallery and/or institutional setting (e.g. WHEREISANAMENDIETA, Liberate Tate etc).
  • Protest as the duality and contradictions of arrest as a control of bodies, and as a protection of bodies.
  • Explorations of restorative and transformative justice, penal reform, and abolitionism.
  • The influence of legal structures and policies on recent or historical actions and protests, with particular focus on how this has been used as a regulatory and disciplinary tool.
  • Protest, legal action, and minoritarian feminisms.
  • Resistance to repressive politics through action, arrest, stillness and movement.
  • Considerations of police behaviour, civil unrest, and dissonance. Moments of action and stillness between dissenters and those attempting to exert state control. (e.g. riot police and protesters, state or police interventions in performance works).
  • The relationship between arrest as being taken into legal custody, and arrest as inaction or stillness.
  • The capitulation of radicalism under neoliberal/late capitalist regimes.
  • Languages of visual activism.

Please send 250 word abstracts and 100 word bios and/or artist statements to actionarrest@gmail.com by the 11th of June 2018.

Bryony White and Savannah Whaley

King’s College London

www.actionarrest.wordpress.com

Kindly supported by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership

 

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CFP: DISTRACTION Birkbeck Institute for Social Research Graduate Conference – deadline 7 May 2018

The Call for Papers for the BISR annual graduate conference has been extended! The theme this year is DISTRACTION.

This conference aims to involve PhD students and early career researchers from all disciplines and institutions. It is funded by the Birkbeck Institutes of Social ResearchGender and Sexuality, and Humanities

Dates: 8-9 June 2018

NEW DEADLINE: 7th May 2018. Please send 200 word abstracts and 50 word biography to bisr@bbk.ac.uk. If you are also interested in taking part in the running of the event such as chairing a panel, please get in touch via this email.

We are delighted to confirm Prof. Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford) and Dr. Sophie Jones (Birkbeck, English) as our keynote speakers.

 

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/fellows-and-academic-staff/d/carolin-duttlinger

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/sophie-jones

 

Full details: http://bit.ly/2hCcxuq

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CFP: JAWS Journal deadline 20 November 2017

Call for Papers

JAWS: Journal of Arts Writing by Students Volume 4 Issue 1

Call for papers.

JAWS is the only academic arts journal run by and dedicated to postgraduate students (and those who have recently graduated). We have published work by students from India, China, Australia, North America, Canada and the United Kingdom, and maintain an international peer-review network.

What We Want:

  • Theoretical and discursive essays up to 5000 words.
  • Critical reviews of events, exhibitions or performances up to 3000 words.
  • Visual essays about art practice (demonstrating a research approach, and if possible responding to the journal format), including images or stills, plus up to 1000 words.

All work must be prefaced with a 100 word abstract and 6–8 keywords, and followed by a short contributor biography. Please include your university affiliation, full name, course and year of graduation.

All work must use Harvard referencing, following Intellect House Style. For full submission guidelines please refer to www.jawsjournal.com/submissions.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 20 November 2017.

Volume 1 Issue 1 is available for free at:

www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/jaws/

Our guest editorials from previous issues are also available for free, including those by Professor Arnold Aronson (Columbia University), Dr Sophie Hope (Birkbeck), Dr Inger Mewburn (the Thesis Whisperer) and Professor Joseph Heathcott (The New School of Design).

For all inquiries please email rob@jawsjournal.com  or babettescarlet@gmail.com. 

 

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Satellite meeting – 18 Oct 2017 2-4pm

The next meeting of Satellite will take place tomorrow – Wednesday 18 October 2017, 14.00-16.00 in Keynes Library (Room 114), 43 Gordon Square.

Satellite is an experimental group within the School of Arts focused on learning technologies, broadly defined. It operates as a hybrid, in that it is both a formal subcommittee for the School of Arts’ Teaching and Quality Enhancement Committee, and at the same time, a forum for exchanging information and perspectives on the critical, creative, academic and pedagogical dimensions of learning technologies.

Although as a subcommittee Satellite includes formal department representatives, its meetings remain an open forum for all who would like to attend, including academic and administrative staff, as well as postgraduate research students.

Minutes from our last meeting, along with an agenda for the forthcoming meeting, are available on Satellite’s Moodle page (http://moodle.bbk.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=4447). If you are not already enrolled, once there, you simply need to self-enrol using the following enrolment key: artstel

Very best,
Scott

______________________________

Dr Scott Rodgers

Senior Lecturer in Media Theory | Assistant Dean for Learning, Teaching and Retention | Programme Co-Director, BA Media and Culture

Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies, School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London, 43 Gordon Square,

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Democracy and the Arts: Artists in a Global World – 28 March 2017 7pm

Democracy and the Arts: Artists in a Global World

is taking place on Tuesday March 28 7pm

at Rich Mix, 35-47 Bethnal Green Road (Shoreditch High Street Overground / Liverpool St underground).

The series will explore the opportunities and challenges Brexit poses for people working in the arts. In the first event, speakers will explore the implications of immigration, cosmopolitanism, national identity and borders for the artists and arts.

Tickets are available from the Rich Mix website:  https://www.richmix.org.uk/events/spoken-word/democracy-and-arts-europe-artists-global-world

Speaking about this event, Munira Mirza, formerly Deputy Mayor for Education and Culture at the GLA, says: “The June 23rd referendum raised lots of important issues which affect the arts as much as anyone else. The debate about immigration and freedom of movement was one of the most heated, with many Leave voters caricatured as Little Englanders. However, for many people, leaving the EU offers a chance to develop a new approach to internationalism and a more humane and fair immigration system. It’s vital that the arts engage in these discussions, as they testify to the power of global relationships.”

Munira Mirza will be joined by Jo Glanville, director of English PEN, Manick Govinda (Head of Artist Advisory Service and Producer at Artsadmin), Mark Ball (outgoing artistic director of London International Festival of Theatre) and artist Eca Eps (aka Sarah Peace). The panel will be chaired by Alastair Donald (Future Cities Project).

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