Arabic Poetry and Stories in Translation – Life Journeys 8 November 2019 6.30pm Keynes Library

Arabic Poetry and Stories in Translation

A Series of Workshops at Birkbeck and SOAS presented by Marina Warner (Birkbeck) and Wen-chin Ouyang (SOAS)

8 November 2019

Haifa Zangana and Wen-chin Ouyang

Public event:

Life Journeys

6:30-7:30 pm

Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square

Tickets: https://bit.ly/36r2Aq8

 

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Napoleon Harlequin: Theatre and the Battle for Legitimacy, 1814-15 – 10 June 2019

Lecture by Professor Katherine Astbury

 Napoleon Harlequin:

Theatre and the Battle for Legitimacy, 1814-15

 6 -7.30pm, Monday 10 June 2019

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square. WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a forthcoming lecture by Kate Astbury, Professor of French Studies, University of Warwick.

After the allies entered Paris at the end of March 1814, the city witnessed a flood of pamphlets and prints denouncing Napoleon as ‘tyrant’, ‘monster’, ‘assassin’ and ‘comedian’. This final ‘crime’ might, at first sight, seem somewhat out of place but the battle for legitimacy that was taking place hinged on who had the greater claim to rule France, Napoleon or Louis XVIII. To accuse Napoleon of being a charlatan and an actor merely playing a part was to undermine his right to reign and it thus becomes a repeated element of royalist attacks on the person of the Emperor.  It would however, also be a weapon Napoleon’s supporters could turn to their advantage and this paper will outline the ways in which theatrical metaphor was used by both sides in 1814-15.

The lecture will be followed by questions, and drinks.

All are very welcome!

For further information, please contact Dr Ann Lewis: a.lewis@bbk.ac.uk

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CFP: Journal of Arts Writing – Deadline 22 April 2019

JAWS: Journal of Arts Writing by Students Volume 5 Issue 1

JAWS is the only academic arts journal run by and dedicated to MA and PhD students (and those who have recently graduated). We have published work by students from India, China, Australia, North America, Canada and the UK, and maintain an international peer-review network.

What We Want:
Theoretical and discursive essays up to 6000 words.

Critical reviews of events, exhibitions or performances up to 3000 words.

Submissions of practice accompanied by text. The word count for this type of submission can be negotiated through the peer review and editing process, but we recommend between 3000–5000 words. We strongly recommend authors consult our peer review guidance for unconventional submissions on our website prior to submitting, please see the link below.

All work must be sent in as a Word document to
rob@jawsjournal.com, and be prefaced with a 100-word abstract and 6–8 keywords, followed by a short contributor biography. Please include your university affiliation, full name, course and year of graduation. All work must use Harvard referencing, following Intellect House Style. For full submission guidelines and information about the peer review process we employ, please refer to
www.jawsjournal.com/submissions.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 22 April 2019.

Volume 1 Issue 1 is available for free at:
www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/jaws/

Our guest editorials from previous issues are also available, including those by Professor Arnold Aronson (Columbia University), Dr Sophie Hope (Birkbeck), Dr Inger Mewburn (the Thesis Whisperer), Professor Joseph Heathcott (The New School of Design) and Professor Malcolm Quinn (CCW Graduate School):
https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=243/

For all inquiries please email rob@jawsjournal.com.

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CFP: New Configurations of Contemporary Women’s Writing – 9 September 2019

New Configurations of Contemporary Women’s Writing

Postgraduate Contemporary Women’s Writing  Network 7th Biennial Conference

Monday 9th September 2019, The University of Hull

 

The last two years have seen a renewed vigour amongst women to testify to their experiences and protest their causes.  Shouts of #metoo and #timesup have chimed with quieter revisionings of a female-identifying imaginary.  These voices sound out in contemporary women’s writing just as the literature itself offers a language and a form with which to speak of the shifts – a back and forth between politics and women’s writing that is not new, but speaks of an enduring engagement with the current political mood.

New Configurations asks: How does contemporary women’s writing inhabit and convey the texture of our moment?  How does it envisage the future? And, how does current formal innovation shape the future of women’s writing? Alongside this the conference seeks to consider how we might rethink the scope of our field, regarding questions of inclusivity and critical methodologies.

The 2019 PG CWWN Conference invites proposals from Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers for 15 minute papers, creative or creative-critical contributions. We also welcome proposals for panels or round-tables involving 3-4 people. We explicitly invite papers on texts by female-identifying, femme, transgender and non-binary authors as well as cis-gendered women writers.

Abstracts (250 words) and biographical notes (150 words) should be sent by 7th June 2019 to pgcwwn2019conference@gmail.com

Confirmed Keynote: Joanna Walsh (Seed, break.up, Vertigo, Hotel, Grow a Pair).

Conference Fee: £30 including lunch, dessert and refreshments

Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Gender/Queerness/Reconfiguring binaries/Identity
  • Posthuman/Transhuman
  • Sexuality/Intimacy/Embodiment/Love
  • Maternity/Childlessness/Conjugality/Kinship
  • Utopia/Dystopia/Ecological/Post-Apocalyptic
  • Place/Migration/Nationalism/Cosmopolitanism
  • Disability/Mental Health/Trauma
  • Care/Self-Care
  • Pain/Disease/Gerontology
  • Precarity/Vulnerability/Mortality
  • Conflict/War/Genocide
  • Protest/Feminism/Activism
  • Memoir/Autofiction/Essay/Confessional
  • Experimental Writing/Innovation/Genre
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Submission for Lamplight magazine

Do you write poetry, prose or essays that you feel deserve a platform? Or do you draw, paint or make photography? We would love to hear from you!

 

Lamplight is Birkbeck’s new bimonthly arts & culture magazine, launching in late April. The idea is to provide a platform for students to showcase their writing, visual art, and other creative pursuits. Content is nearly finalised for the first issue and there are just a small number of spaces left for submissions. For prose and essays, we are looking for 600-1200 word pieces. For visual art, we have no specific criteria. It’s unlikely that anything sent after the next two weeks will make it into the first issue (however, don’t let that stop you from submitting for Issue 2!), and the earlier your can get yours in, the better chance you will have of being featured in Lamplight Issue 1. If you have work you would like to share, get in contact with us at lamplightmagazine@gmail.com

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The Essay Film Festival – starting Friday 22 March

The Essay Film Festival is back… starting on Friday 22 March with the opening of our first ever exhibition in the Peltz Gallery, Art at the Frontier of Film Theory: the Work of Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen, with extra screenings, workshops and conversations… please spread the word!

 

Now in its fifth edition, the annual Essay Film Festival, is a collaboration between Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image and the Institute of Contemporary Arts, celebrating the diversity and creativity of those artists and visionaries who work in that unique zone between documentary and experimental modes of filmmaking.

 

This year’s programme features a range of bold and innovative works that cross terrain from Argentina to Hong Kong, Iran to Mexico, USA to Lebanon, Nigeria to UK, embracing themes as varied as cancer, childbirth, the Faust legend, urban decay, workers’ strikes, psychoanalysis, colonialism, natural history, and Finnegans Wake!

 

These films will challenge your perception of the world, your understanding of reality and your place within it; they will move you, surprise you, and inspire you.

 

How does film connect intimate personal choices to political commitment; the archived or forgotten past to the socially active present; the beauty of cinema to terror, injustice and despair? How does film engage with the real while questioning the established forms of film language? And how can film touch us, emotionally and viscerally, and yet maintain that vital reflective edge?

 

Directors Mania Akbari & Douglas White, Andrea Bussmann, Dora García, Christopher Harris, Mary Jirmanus Saba, Bo Wang & Pan Lu, Onyeka Igwe and Jessica Sarah Rinland, all utilise the essay film in different ways to explore these searching questions in this year’s Essay Film Festival.

 

The full programme for EFF 2019 can be found here.

 

Come and join us!

 

Michael Temple, Matthew Barrington, Kieron Corless, Catherine Grant, Janet McCabe, Ricardo Matos Cabo, Raquel Morais, and Laura Mulvey, on behalf of the Essay Film Festival

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Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group – Thursday 21 March

The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group will meet on Thursday 21st March 2019, 14:00-15:30, in Room 101, 30 Russell Square, London, WC1B 5DT. **Please note the change from our usual location** 

 

This session will focus on phenomenological approaches to the medical humanities, and it will be led by Dr Peter Fifield (English and Humanities, Birkbeck) and Dr Mohammed Rashed (Philosophy, Birkbeck). The readings are:

  • Dan Zahavi, Husserl’s Phenomenology (Stanford UP, 2003), pp. 109-125.
  • Havi Carel, Phenomenology of Illness (Oxford UP, 2016), Chapter 1 – “Why Use Phenomenology to Study Illness?”

The readings for each session are held in a shared Dropbox folder. If you need access, email sophie.jones@bbk.ac.uk (include your Dropbox-linked email address, if you have one).

 

Everyone is welcome at the reading group. There is no need to book.

 

The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group aims to create a space in which academics, clinicians and students can come together to explore key readings, ideas and materials in the field of medical humanities. Our endeavour is to find ways of talking across the different disciplines of the humanities and medicine, and we welcome participation from colleagues and students interested and engaged in these areas. For details of previous sessions, please click here.

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Workshop: The Narco-Culture of Narco-Accumulation – Friday 15 March

THE NARCO-CULTURE OF NARCO-ACCUMULATION

A WORKSHOP

The Keynes Library

School of Arts

Birkbeck, University of London

43 Gordon Square

Bloomsbury

London WC1H 0PD

Find us on the map

Friday, March 15th 2019: 10.00 am – 17.00 pm

In this workshop we will discuss the social, political, cultural, as well as the capital-logics of contemporary narco-capitalism and its mobile territories (from the land in which drugs are cultivated, to the virtual world of laundering and finance in which its profits are realized and re-invested), especially as it is both juridically – and thus, militarily – constituted by and at the Mexican-US border. Violence and ‘wars’, of all kinds, are fundamental to these outlaw logics which have spawned a variety of cultural and subjectivizing forms (some of which will be highlighted by our guest speakers here). Indeed, this particular – and supposedly ‘Mexican’ – narco-cultural formation, which at first glance seems to present itself as peripheral, is in fact becoming increasingly central to contemporary forms of capital accumulation and its representation: its presence both seen and heard in the daily news as well as in contemporary art, television, film, literature and music. In this workshop we hope to throw some light on some of these processes from a variety of critical perspectives.

Open to everyone. No booking necessary.

For more information and to see the programme, click here.

This workshop is organised by Professor John Kraniauskas (j.kraniauskas@bbk.ac.uk). For any further information, please contact him.

This workshop is supported by CILAVS, Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies, and BIH, the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

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‘Death, Afterlife and the Question of Autobiography (Biutiful, 2010)’ – Friday 15 March

The Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies, CILAVS, cordially invites you to its Seminar Series event for Spring 2019.

“Death, Afterlife and the Question of Autobiography (Biutiful, 2010)”

A talk by Prof. Cristina Moreiras-Menor, U. Of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Friday 15 March, 2019 at 6PM

Keynes Library

School of Arts

Birkbeck, University of London

43 Gordon Square

London WC1H 0PD

Find us on the map

 

The book The Inoperative Community by Jean-Luc Nancy opens with this statement, which registers the exhaustion of thinking through History as one of the tragedies of our times.  I will approach this exhaustion in regard to a Spanish film that speaks of death and extinction while at the same time proposing, through the passion of its image, and in a certain politics of the afterlife that the film emits, a reflection on the political potentiality that is the recovered through a redemptive historicity. I refer to Biutiful, by Alejandro González Iñárritu (2010), which testifies, from the story of the agony of its protagonist, Uxbal, the presence of an essential in-certainty: life as a transition and, therefore, as a new beginning and/or as a non-finitude. The film proposes a historicity of experience erased by the exhaustion of history to which Nancy refers. Biutiful explodes, in the always continuous wandering of its protagonist through a desolated city, the historicity of its experience of life, death and the afterlife. Afterlife is powerfully associated in the film with the promise and permanence of that which has been lost, and therefore with the experience of remembering. Indeed, the film plays with the idea of a recovery, through a story that I will call autobiographical: the experience of history as afterlife and as event that accumulates death. My essay will be an intervention regarding the need of rethinking the politics of life, memory and inheritance through the facticity of death.

Cristina Moreiras-Menor received her Ph.D in Spanish Literature from the University of California, Davis. Between 1996-2002 she taught Spanish Peninsular literature at Yale University. Currently she is Professor of Iberian Literature and Culture and Women’s Studies at The University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) where she was the Chair of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures for the last eight years and where she works in Galician and Spanish Literature, Spanish film, cultural theory, and psychoanalysis. She has published extensively on 19 and 20th century Spanish literature and film.  She is the author of Cultura herida: Literatura y cine en la España democrática (Libertarias, 2002), La estela del tiempo: historicidad e imagen en el cine español contemporáneo (Editorial Iberoamericana Vervuert,  2011), and  the editor of a monographic issue of the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies entitled Critical interventions on Violence. With historian Miguel Ángel del Arco Blanco, she is the editor of Constelaciones, a new series of the Editorial Cómares dedicated to publish outstanding work on Peninsular Cultural studies. She is currently working on two books, one on Novo Cinema Galego with particular attention to documentary, and the second one on the political and aesthetic relation between landscape and historicity in the works of some renowned Spanish writers (Juan Goytisolo, Juan Benet, Federico Sanchez Ferlosio, among others).

Entrance free but booking here necessary.

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The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group – 31 January 2019

The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group will meet on 31st January 2019, 14:30-16:00 in the Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD to consider work on the topic of the politics of bodily comportment. This session will be led by Dr Harriet Cooper, Researcher in Rights-based Rehabilitation at the University of East Anglia, and the material to be discussed is as follows:

  • Iris Marion Young, ‘Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Bodily Comportment, Motility and Spatiality’, Human Studies, 3, 137-156 (1980)

 

 

 

The readings for each session – including the Iris Marion Young essay not linked above – are held in a shared Dropbox folder. If you need access, email sophie.jones@bbk.ac.uk (include your Dropbox-linked email address, if you have one).

Everyone is welcome at the reading group. There is no need to book.

The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group aims to create a space in which academics, clinicians and students can come together to explore key readings, ideas and materials in the field of medical humanities. Our endeavour is to find ways of talking across the different disciplines of the humanities and medicine, and we welcome participation from colleagues and students interested and engaged in these areas. For details of previous sessions, please click here.

 

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