Why businesses fail: Being unattractive to investors

Welcome to Why businesses fail, the second of five blogs that delves into the reasons for businesses failing and offering solutions. This series was launched by Lucy Robinson of Birkbeck Futures and Ghazala Zia from Windsor Swan. In this blog, they share some practical tips to get investors to demonstrate traction in your business and attract potential investors.

Lucy Robinson is the Employability Consultant for Business and Enterprise at Birkbeck Futures. She runs the Pioneer programme for aspiring and early-stage entrepreneurs and hosts an enterprise series on the #FuturesPodcast.

Ghazala Zia is a Venture Capital Advisor at Windsor Swan, a boutique London business advisory firm. She has an extensive legal background and currently specialises in advising start-ups of all stages on funding, strategy and business analysis.

Being unattractive to investors is a primary reason why some start-ups fail, and there’s a few pitfalls to avoid here. One big one is not showing traction.

Having a strong and evidenced market need for your product or service is the best way to demonstrate traction. By traction, we don’t mean a few thousand likes or free users – that’s not enough for an investor. It needs to be clear that this engagement is converting into paying customers, which is a trackable and easily identifiable metric. Engagement without custom isn’t traction or validation of your product. It could be a sign that you’ve got great marketing or that you’ve got a particularly active customer base, but if they’re not actually buying your product it suggests they don’t really need it.

One metric you should always know as part of your financial model is how many customers you need to stay viable. Before you start pouring hours into creating content, or spending time and money adding new features to your product, ask yourself: “What value am I adding?”. If the effort, energy and resources you use won’t actually convert to more sales, you should consider if it’s really necessary.

Investors vary with the level of traction they’d like to see, and different types of investors look for different amounts. For example, if you’re an early-stage start-up you’re likely looking at individual investors like Angels. Angels want to get involved at an early stage and take a punt on your business, if they see something in you. At a later stage, when you’re in revenue, you might use Seed Investors. Seed Investors get involved when you can demonstrate more growth that they want to get on board with. Generally speaking, investors want to make ten times return on their investment. This means you need to demonstrate traction which suggests they’ll be able to achieve this by investing in you.

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