Royal Photographic Society Lecture – George Szirtes: 23 January 2018 6pm

Historical Group  of the Royal Photographic Society lecture at the Royal Philatelic Society, 23 January 2018, 6pm

NEW SPEAKER.

Unfortunately, Mr. Robert Gurbo – who was going to speak on Andre Kertész: The Real Biography – is indisposed, and is not able to deliver the inaugural Colin Ford lecture until later in the year.  However,  we are happy to announce that his place is being taken by Mr George Szirtes

Mr. Szirtes, as well as being a lover of Hungarian photography, is a distinguished writer, translator and poet. His poems include verses about André Kertész, and these and others of his poems will be read by the actors Stephen Thorne and Timothy West.  Mr. Szirtes contributed a chapter to the catalogue for the 2011 exhibition Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the Twentieth Century, curated by Colin Ford at London’s Royal Academy of Arts

George Szirtes is an Honorary Fellow of Goldsmith’s College, of the Hungarian Academy of Arts and Letters, and of the Royal Society of Literature. As a journalist, he contributes to BBC radio and television, The Times, The Guardian and The Independent, and has won numerous awards and honours for his academic work and translations.

See: http://georgeszirtes.blogspot.co.uk/p/george-szirtes-curriculum-vitae-to.htm

Colin Ford will introduce George Szirtes, to whom we are extremely grateful for agreeing to speak to us at such very short notice.

NOTE: As this event is not as originally advertised, it is not being seen as the inaugural ‘Colin Ford lecture’ but as a prelude to the series.

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Photographing the rituals of healing and dying in Latin America – Wed 22 March 2017

Peltz Gallery talk: Photographing the rituals of healing and dying in Latin AmericaWed 22 March 2017

Photographing the rituals of healing and dying in Latin America

Wed 22 March 2017, 19:00-20:00

Peltz Gallery, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

To accompany the exhibition ‘Decolonizing “witchcraft”: Portraits of traditional healing in Bolivia’ at the Peltz Gallery, ‘Photographing the rituals of healing and dying in Latin America’ considers some of the visual and ethical challenges of documentary photography. Join Patrizia di Bello, Senior Lecturer in History and Theory of Photography at Birkbeck College, and photographers David Green and Marcel Reyes-Cortez, as they explore the themes of ritual, community and cultural memory raised by the exhibition. The evening will reflect on Green’s experience working with communities of indigenous health practitioners in Bolivia and Reyes-Cortez’s work documenting the cultural practices of death and mourning in Mexico.

Dr Patrizia di Bello is Senior Lecturer in the History of Photography and co-director of the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, University of London. She is the author of Women’s Albums and Photography in Victorian Britain: Ladies, Mothers and Flirts (Ashgate 2007); editor of Art, History and the Senses: 1830 to the present (Ashgate 2009), with Gabriel Koureas; and of The Photobook from Talbot to Ruscha (IB Tauris, 2012), with Colette Wilson and Shamoon Zamir. Her next monograph, Sculptural Photographs from the Calotype to the Digital, will be published by Bloomsbury in December 2017.

David Green is a born people watcher. ‘The challenge of relaxing a subject and capturing their essence is endlessly compelling to me and keeps me passionate about portrait photography.’ An American, who’s made his home in North London, David has been working as a freelance photographer for several years, shooting a wide range of people, from Noble Prize winners to comedians, authors, actors, CEOs, TV news readers, and most recently “witches” in Bolivia and robot camel jockeys in Oman. His work has appeared in Timeout London, the Guardian, Hackney and Islington Gazettes, Artenol magazine in New York, The Times of Oman, the Southbank Centre, Barcelona Metropolitan to name a few – even the FBI website (that’s the Feminist Bureau of Investigation, of course): http://www.feministbureauofinvestigation.co.uk

Marcel Reyes-Cortez is a Visual Anthropologist and photographer living and working in London. In 1993 he graduated with a BA (Hons) in photography from the London College of Printing and in 1995 he gained an MA in Social Anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Marcel returned to academia and in 2006 he gained an MRes in Visual Anthropology. His doctoral research (2007-10) became the first to be awarded a PhD from Goldsmiths, University of London in ‘Visual Anthropology’.

‘Decolonising “witchcraft”: Portraits of traditional healers in Bolivia’ is on at the Peltz Gallery, School of Arts, Birkbeck College 3-25 March 2017.

All welcome

To book your FREE ticket go to

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/photographing-the-rituals-of-healing-and-dying-in-latin-america-tickets-31962861780

If you have any additional access requirements please get in touch elizabeth.johnson@bbk.ac.uk

 

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Practice Based – Corkscrew Spring Term 2017

CORKSCREW: SPRING 2017

Show and Tell

Hosted by Bruno Roubicek, artist and Birkbeck PhD student, show and tell sessions invite practice-based research students to present work in progress. It’s an opportunity to share your emerging practice and receive feedback in a supportive environment. Sessions through the year will consider how practice and scholarship can work together to generate insight and understanding. What is “doing knowledge” and how can practice be made evident to examiners?

On Monday 27 February, 2-5pm, join us for the spring Show and Tell session. Alongside presentations, we will discuss Sophie Hope’s article ‘Bursting paradigms: a colour wheel of practice-research’, Cultural Trends, 25, 2 (2016), 74-86 (NB. Senate House Library membership needed for access via this link).

Show and Tell takes place in G10, School of Arts. The summer date will be announced later in the year.

RSVP to Bruno here.

The Particularities of Conference Presentation

On Friday 3 March, 9.30am-12.30pm, join us for a 3-hour workshop that offers training in delivering conference presentations effectively.

Conference presentation is an essential aspect of the working life of a professional researcher.  Yet doctoral students often acquire skills in this area somewhat unevenly, learning through trial and error.  This workshop approaches the conference presentation as a moment of public performance.  It asks: what are the formal features of an effective presentation?  What techniques can a presenter use to communicate with his or her audience – whether in the context of scholarly conferences, public lectures, or arts venues?  This workshop is run in collaboration with artists from Haranczak-Navarre Performance Projects.

Participating students can then either attend or present research on collaborative practices at Twofold: the Particularities of Working in Pairs (Friday 3 & Saturday 4 March 2017) – a symposium that explores the duet as a mode of collaboration across the disciplines.  See the foot of this email for the CFP – deadline Friday 27 January.

The Particularities of Conference Presentation is supported by the CHASE Cohort Development Fund.  Places are free but limited to 20 – booking is essential.

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History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Spring 2017 Events

History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Spring 2017

Free and open to all, at 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Thursday 19 January 2017, 6:00-7:30pm

Room 120, 43 Gordon Square

Margaret Iversen

Profane Illuminations

pi

Robert Rauschenberg, Rebus, 1955.

Walter Benjamin credited the Surrealist movement with ‘a true, creative overcoming of religious illumination’ by replacing it with a kind of ‘profane illumination’. This talk attends to two key moments in the art of producing technically mediated, profane illuminations. They are, first, the innovations of the Surrealist movement itself and, second, Leo Steinberg’s ‘Other Criteria’ with its conception of the picture plane as a receptive surface or, as he put it, ‘a consciousness immersed in the brain of the city’.

 

Thursday 2 February 2017, 6:00-7:30pm

Room B04, 43 Gordon Square

Marcia Pointon (Professor Emeritus, University of Manchester, and Research Fellow, Courtauld Institute of Art)

Robert Harris’s Photography at De Beer’s Kimberley Diamond Mine 1875-1890

 

Thursday 27 April 2017, 6:00-7:30

Room 106, 43 Gordon Square

Christina Riggs (University of East Anglia)

Photographing Tutankhamun: Photo-objects and the archival afterlives of colonial archaeology

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History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Autumn 2016 Events

History and Theory of Photography Research Centre Autumn 2016

Free and open to all, at 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

This autumn we welcome to Birkbeck Professor Steve Edwards, who will also be joining the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, and look forward to two seminars on illustrated magazines:

Monday 24 October, 6:00-7:30pm

Room 106 (was 112)

Tim Satterthwaite (Visiting Lecturer, University of Brighton)

Spiritualising the machine: the modernist photography of UHU magazine

The photo-illustrated monthly UHU was at the heart of the progressive photographic culture of Weimar Germany. In a stream of articles and photo-pages in the late 1920s, UHU showcased the work of modernist photographers, such as Albert Renger-Patzsch and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, alongside the radical new perspectives of scientific and aerial photography. UHU’s modernism offered more, however, than a simple embrace of technological modernity; like the great photographic exhibitions of the period, the magazine sought a reconciliation between the rationalising forces of the machine age and the organic principles of the natural world and traditional life. This talk describes how UHU’s modernist synthesis was expressed through a unifying aesthetic of repetition and regularity. The magazine’s photographs of microscopic plant forms, aerial landscapes, and the textures of urban life, were symbolic of alternative visions of social order – the organic or technocratic principles of an ideal future society.

Wednesday 16 November, 6:00-7:30pm

Room 116 (was 112)

Samuel Bibby (Association of Art Historians)

‘New! Art… Plus Added Social Purpose’: BLOCK and the Periodical Landscape of 1970s British Art History

Dates for next term:

Thursday 2 February 2017, 6:00-7:30pm

Marcia Pointon (Professor Emeritus in History of Art, University of Manchester, and Research Fellow, Courtauld Institute of Art)

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Call for Papers – ‘The Print Screen: Image and Text, or Image as Text’ conference, deadline 8 April 2016

The Print Screen: Image and Text, Or Image as Text one-day conference will be held at the University of Westminster in central London on Thursday May 12, 2016.

Although all are welcome and encouraged to come and take part, the conference is mainly targeted at PhD researchers and Early Career Researchers and aims to offer a friendly, inter-disciplinary space for the dissemination of ideas amongst researchers with a shared interest.

Call for Papers

This conference centres upon the intersection between image and text; pictorial depiction in relation to the written word. This inter-disciplinary position allows for contributions from literary studies, visual and cultural studies, photography and fine arts.

The image/text relationship is perhaps one of the most significant fields of current academic study since constructions of the text and the image, the modes of reading and seeing dependent on these constructions and the relationships between each of them play an important role in the control of human perception and knowledge and the limits and constraints it is based on. The study of this field can explore these limits and learn how to transgress them in radical ways to create new ways of seeing and readings.

The field is in a state of rapid change which begs more sustained analysis. With the telecommunications revolution and the change in popular reading habits the boundaries between image and text are becoming increasingly blurred. In our time children are taught to read from an early age in a practice which links pictures with the text and increasingly, people see the TV or film adaptations before they read the books. On a daily basis, they send and read texts and emails with emoticons.

This conference offers a unique opportunity to explore the image/text interaction through multiple perspectives. Topics for papers can cover varying geographic and historical situations and include, but are not limited to:

–       the inclusion of words in Western art or calligraphy and the calligraphic art of the East and Arabic worlds;
–       illustration as readings of writing, e.g. children’s illustration;
–       the representation of the letter as or against or in relation to the image or the relationship between reading and seeing (e.g. in children’s ABC and learning-to-read books);
–       ekphrasis, or descriptions of images in writing;
–       film and writing – adaptations of writing for the image;
–       erotica and sex scenes in literature in relation to vision;
–       illustration, photography and their relationship to scientific writing and the encyclopaedia;
–       non-standard typographic representations in literature;
–       the use of both images and texts within the canon and archive;

 

Submission and Attendance Information
Prospective authors are invited to submit their 200 word abstract for their paper to suneel.mehmi@my.westminster.ac.uk

The deadline for submission is Friday 8th April 2016. Successful candidates will be selected by the hosting committee.

This is a free event but places are limited. If you simply wish to attend rather than to present, please register by sending an email to the above email address and further details will follow in due course.

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CILAVS Seminar Series talk: ‘Memory as Montage: The Visual Archive of the Spanish Civil War’, Tuesday 9 February 2016

You are warmly invited to the next Seminar Series talk organised by the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS)

Professor Sebastiaan Faber (Oberlin College)

Memory as Montage:
The Visual Archive of the Spanish Civil War

Tuesday 9 February 2016, 6.00pm

Keynes Library, School of Arts
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cilavs/events/

Images were central to the story of the Spanish Civil War and continue to be central in its memory today. After all, the war in Spain was the first major armed conflict to be covered by the modern visual media, equipped with newly portable photo and film cameras. Telling this visual story was not a mere matter of shooting films and photographs, however; it was also one of cutting and pasting. The photomontage, whose use had spread rapidly since the 1920s, became a crucial tool not just for propaganda posters but in journalism as well. And yet the centrality of montage as a tool for truth-telling has not been sufficiently acknowledged. A treasure hunt through the visual archive of the Spanish Civil War yields some surprising finds that place long-standing debates about the historical memory of the conflict in a new light.

Sebastiaan Faber is Professor of Hispanic Studies at Oberlin College and visiting researcher at the Radboud University in Nijmegen. He has published widely on Spanish and Latin American literature and culture. He is the author of Exile and Cultural Hegemony: Spanish Intellectuals in Mexico, 1939-1975 (Vanderbilt, 2002) and Anglo-American Hispanists and the Spanish Civil War: Hispanophilia, Commitment, and Discipline (Palgrave, 2008), and has co-edited Contra el olvido. El exilio expañol en Estados Unidos (U de Alcalá, 2009). From 2010 till 2015 he served as the Chair of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives (ALBA), whose quarterly journal The Volunteer he co-edits.

A drinks reception will follow.

All welcome, no booking is required

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Marta Weiss, with Colin Ford: ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’, 26 Jan 2016

‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’

Marta Weiss (Victoria & Albert Museum)

Responding: Colin Ford (Former head of the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television in Bradford)

When: Tuesday 26 January 2016, 6:00 – 8:00pm

Where: Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 46 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

This seminar will explore the new material Martha Weiss discovered while researching the current must-see exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, marking the bicentenary of the birth of Julia Margaret Cameron, 150 years after she first exhibited her work there. Colin Ford has worked extensively on this important photographer, most notably in the comprehensive catalogue Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002).

This event is presented in collaboration between the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre.

The session is free and all are welcome, but since the venue has limited space it will be first come, first seated.

Learn more about the Julia Margaret Cameron Exhibition at the V & A here: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/julia-margaret-cameron/about-the-exhibition/

Download Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002) here: http://www.getty.edu/publications/virtuallibrary/0892366818.html

For further information on the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, see: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research/photography

For further information on the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, see: http://www.cncs.bbk.ac.uk/

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