Highlighted CHASE training opportunities and calls

The following events and opportunities are available via the AHRC funded CHASE Doctoral Training Programme. All of the opportunities below are open to all Arts and Humanities PhD students at Birkbeck, regardless of whether they are funded or self-funded. If I could also draw your attention to a couple of calls for papers/participation that are currently open.

Journal recruiting members for next Editorial Board

Brief Encounters is currently recruiting the next Editorial Board to oversee the creation of issue 5 – see below press release:

Seaside, Ruin and De-Industrialisation on the Cleveland Coast

Friday 10th to sunday 12th of January

Redcar/Cleveland

Following the critical excursion Beyond the Heartlands and building on themes of de-industrialisation, landscape and ruin, the ‘Space Place Time’ research collective are calling for participants for a two-day critical excursion to Redcar and Cleveland. Completed in 1846, the Middlesbrough and Redcar Railway hoped to attract tourism, but like much of the region, Redcar’s expansion came with the 1850 discovery of iron ore in the Eston area of the Cleveland Hills. The engine of Britain’s Industrial Revolution, Redcar was simultaneously home to a Victorian pleasure pier. The pier’s demolition in 1981 can be seen as an allegory of the decade’s slum, which saw the simultaneous decline of both industries.

Find out more here

The Frankfurt Exotic: broken objects and porous walls in Naples

Beginning of April (deadline to apply 15 Jan)

Naples, Italy

Following the critical excursion Re-mapping the Arcades Project in Glasgow, and building on the field engagement with the work and cities of Walter Benjamin, we are calling for participants in a critical excursion in Naples: The Frankfurt Exotic: broken objects and porous walls in Naples. This critical excursion will take place over 4 nights at the beginning of April 2020 and will involve a series of workshops, walking tours and screenings with the anticipated outcome of a publication recording conversations, presentations, works in progress, creative responses and translation work.

Find out more and apply here

Bookscapes

Friday 17th of January (from 12:00) – Norfolk Heritage Centre

Saturday 18th January – Blickling Estate

The second of the CHASE DTP-funded Bookscapes workshops, offering PhD students advanced training in palaeographical, codicological and bibliographical skills, will take place on 17th-18th January 2020, hosted by the University of East Anglia and led by Tom Roebuck and Sophie Butler. At the Norfolk Heritage Centre, on day one of the workshop, attending students will have the opportunity to engage with the collections of the original Norwich City Library (founded in 1618). The workshop will move to Blickling Estate on the second day, where the students will focus on the techniques and history of bookbinding and the history of the book. The second day’s workshop will be led by Nicholas Pickwoad, one of the leading experts on bookbinding and an adviser to the National Trust on book conservation.

Numbers for the workshops are strictly limited. We encourage all interested PhD students to contact bookscapes@kent.ac.uk as soon as possible. You can also follow us on twitter at https://twitter.com/bookscapes.

CHASE Essentials – Thesis Boot Camp

Saturday 1st and Sunday 2nd of February

University of Sussex

Are you a mid- or late-stage doctoral researcher, struggling to make progress with your thesis? Do you keep putting off your writing? If so, Thesis Boot Camp could be the solution. Deadline to apply – 17 January.

Find out more and register here

Aural Diversity

Various dates and venues, please see below

Aural Diversity is a series of lectures, workshops and in-situ training sessions seeking to encourage creative and critical attention towards aural diversity within the arts and humanities, with particular focus on an ecology of the ear, designed for all those researching within the Arts and Humanities, especially those with an interest in the creative, social and political dimensions of sound and listening.

These sessions specifically address the need for further study and practice inspired by, and concerning, this specific turn in research and focus on a particular theme led by an academic/practitioner with invited guests selected to represent a range of approaches. 

Session #1 | Thursday 13 February | 1000-1800 | Goldsmiths, University of London – Register here

Session # 2 | Thursday 27 February | 1000-1800 | Room 264, Senate House, London – Register here

Session #3 | Thursday 12 March | 1000-1800 | Goldsmiths, University of London – Register here

Plenary | Thursday 26 March | 1500-1800 | Keynes Library, Birkbeck, University of London – Register here

Ethnography and Film. Exploring Labour, Technology and Mediation in the Egyptian Film Industry

19 Feb (14:00-20:30)

University of Kent

The workshop will offer participants advanced training in ethnography, applied to the context of the Egyptian Film industry. Dr El Khachab’s workshop will outline how researchers can successfully apply ethnographic methodologies, developed in Anthropology, to research issues about arts and media, especially film. Dr El Khachab will outline the strategies he developed during his PhD research to gather observations, interviews and documentary data from creatives and technicians working in the largest and most influential media industry in the Arab world. He will also provide participants an insight into how he adapted the presentation of his findings from his PhD thesis into his forthcoming monograph, The Egyptian Film Industry: Labor, Technology, Mediation.

Find out more and register here

Call for proposals | The Essay Film Festival: Research, Critique, Practice

As part of its new collaborative partnership with CHASE, the Essay Film Festival is inviting proposals from doctoral students for a student-led symposium exploring essayistic forms and their relationship to academic research, social critique and artistic practice.

The conference will combine research presentations and film screenings, including examples of practice-led researchers talking through, questioning and “essaying” their own work. This event will follow the sixth edition of the Essay Film Festival, which will take place at Birkbeck Cinema, ICA, Goethe-Institut and Institut Français, from 26 March to 4 April 2020.

The symposium will be held at Birkbeck Cinema in May 2020 (exact date to be confirmed), more than a month after the end of the festival. The idea of the conference is, therefore, to provide a space for critical reflection and debate, with a certain detachment from the EFF programme itself, as well as to propose and discuss new directions for the festival in the future.

Deadline – Friday 14 February

Full details here

Call for Papers | Critical Race Studies and the Premodern: Archive and Seminar

23rd to 24th March – University of East Anglia
8th to 9th June – University of Sussex

Universities of East Anglia and Sussex are hosting two postgraduate training workshops on critical race studies and the pre-modern. The first of these will be held at the University of East Anglia, 23-24 March 2020, and will focus on teaching and pedagogy; the second will be held at The University of Sussex, 8-9 June 2020, and will focus on research. Both events are designed to develop students’ professional skills. We invite expressions of interest from all postgraduates working in the Humanities (giving papers, designing and chairing sessions, attending).

Deadline – Friday 24 January

Find out more here

Dandelion – Call for papers

Submissions are invited on the theme of

Animals

“The main shortcoming of humanistic scholarship is its extreme anthropocentrism”, Edward O Wilson recently claimed, arguing that this was “a major cause of the alarming decline in public esteem and support of the humanities”. The humanities have begun to pay attention to the depredations of the Anthropocene and to our animality, our animal origins, in the work of Donna Harraway and Pierre Huyghe, to give two notable examples. However, it could also be argued that they have narrowed dramatically, to become obsessed with individual human identity, advancing the causes of particular, discrete groups of humans. A position one could say is hyper-Anthropocenic, one following the atomizing, conflict-generating logic of neo-liberalism, which one can in turn relate to an epidemic of self-obsession and narcissism in the mirror-world of the culture at large.

Can an increased concern in the humanities with animals and animality, and therefore with nature, and by extension science, offer a way out of this impasse? Animals are still at the centre of our culture; they have always answered out needs, and our attitude to them is as conflicted as it has always been. The anthropomorphism that still dominates our attitude to them often takes on sentimental forms, yet it developed as an entirely utilitarian way to aid hunting in prehistory. When we begin to consider animals and animality we enter a world of contradictions. We spend tens of millions on pet food, but still slaughter huge numbers of animals. We could not have survived the last Ice Age without their furs and skins, and it was increased consumption of their meat that led to the increased brain size that allowed our bipedalism to advance, and thus to the descent of the larynx, and thus language; in short, this almost-cannibalism, this never-ending slaughter, was essential to our becoming human.

George Bataille said that animals dwell in the world “like water in water”, in an unmediated, non-destructive, but utterly determined way, and that humans had also once dwelt in the world in this way. But at some point in prehistory, this changed, and our exploitation of Gaia began. Questions contributors may want to consider are where our differences from animals truly lay?  Where do we find what remains of our animalism? Are there times and privileged circumstances in which we too can dwell in the world ‘like water in water’, and how can we, and should we, create them? How much closer can we come to animals? Is there anything to be said for holding up something programmed to pursue its genetic interests, allowing nothing to stand in its way, without altruism, and beyond good and evil, as a redemptive model? What possibility is there of having genuine access to the umwelt of, and somehow experiencing the full ontological reality of what is biologically different in any case? Can insights about our animality help us exit the Anthropocene without disaster, and not just ensure our survival, but even our self-overcoming, and new way of being in the world?

The word ‘animals’ has many ramifications, various morphologies, histories, and synonyms and antonyms, all of which contributors are free to explore. Topics may be related, but are not limited, to:

  • The Animal, Gender and Sexuality
  • Representations of the Animal and Neurodivergence
  • Animal rights
  • The Anthroposcene/Post-anthroposcene
  • Anthrozoology
  • The post-human
  • The trans-human
  • Humanism and anti-humanism
  • Animal Studies
  • Animalism
  • Beastliness
  • Animal consciousness
  • The Chthulucene
  • The animal as trope
  • Anthropomorphism and totemism
  • The animal and animalism in philosophy
  • Anthropocentrism
  • Animal-human relations
  • The humanoid and the theanthropic
  • Chimeras and monsters
  • The fabular
  • The apocalyptic and the revenge of nature
  • The animal in horror and science fiction
  • Becoming animal
  • Evolution
  • Extinction
  • Human as animal, animal as human

Submission guidelines

We welcome long articles (of 5000-8000 words), or shorter ones (of 3000-5000 words). We also welcome reviews of books, films, performances, exhibitions, and festivals (of around 1500 words).

We also publish interviews that you may wish to conduct with an author/artist, and artwork including visual art; creative writing; podcasts, and video footage (up to 10 minutes).

We would be happy to discuss ideas for submissions with interested authors prior to the submission deadline.

Please send your submissions to mail@dandelionjournal.org by 1st August, 2020

Assessors sought to assess CREST Award projects from 14 to 19-year-old students

The British Science Association’s mission is to transform the diversity and inclusivity of science; to reach under-served audiences and increase the number of people who are actively involved and engaged in science. 

They are looking to recruit CREST assessors within the fields of: STEM, Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences and Economics. The CREST Awards is one of their flagship programmes for young people. CREST inspires and engages young people aged 5 to 19-years old with project-based STEM activities.

CREST Assessors sought

  • CREST assessors help to develop students’ interest and attitudes towards science, along with their scientific and project skills. They do this by assessing Silver and Gold projects against the CREST assessment criteria, providing constructive feedback and encouragement, and sharing their STEM expertise with young people. Often, project assessment is the first time students’ work is seen by someone other than their parents or teachers. Students value the opportunity to share their work with someone with expertise and/or a career in the STEM sector. 
  • Assessing projects can be done on a voluntary or paid basis paid (£4 per Silver Award assessment and £6 per Gold Award assessment), with approximately 5 hours’ worth of assessments per month. All assessment and feedback are carried out via our online platform. 
  • Assessors are trained how to assess projects and give effective feedback. Also, assessing CREST projects count towards STEM Ambassador volunteer hours.  

Further details

Please see the complete details for the role here.

Those interested should register their interest in this form and will be contacted shortly afterwards. If you have any questions, would like to know more about CREST Awards or have any thoughts on who else might be interested in the CREST assessor role, please contact Claudia Linan, Education Officer: t. +44 (0)20 7019 4969

Highlighted CHASE Training Opportunities

The following events and opportunities are available via the AHRC funded CHASE Doctoral Training Programme. All of the opportunities below are open to all Arts and Humanities PhD students at Birkbeck, regardless of whether they are funded or self-funded.

Performing Theory Series – Nuclear Hallucinations

Thursday, 24 October 2019 | 17:00  20:00

Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross, SE14 6NW
MRB Screen 1

This event inaugurates a new academic year for those of us doing Screen related research, by hearing from practitioners about the relationship between their ideas and their images.

Fathima Nizaruddin will be here to screen and discuss her 2016 film,  Nuclear Hallucinations.

Discussion and reception to follow.

Find out more and register here

Translation x Creative Writing

Various dates from 28 October | 1400-1600 | University of East Anglia

This series of masterclasses is by translators of creative writing for creative writers and is designed to provide insight into these acts of translation that many if not all creative writers engage with. The sessions are small group and are led by the world’s leading translators – including two Booker Prize nominees and one Booker winner. Sessions will be craft focused. Session leaders include Jeremy Tiang, Antonia Lloyd-Jones, Duncan Large, Daniel Hahn and Marilyn Booth who will share their expertise and insights exclusively on the topic. Each masterclass will explore from a different perspective the relationship between translation and creative writing – which, although inextricably connected, are rarely considered together.

Find out more and register here

CHASE Latin for Medieval and Early Modernists 2019/20

4-8 November & 1-5 June 2020 | University of East Anglia

The CHASE Latin for Medievalists and Early Modernists course is a series of workshops and residential weeks designed to provide Latin tuition from beginner to intermediate levels, as well as facilitate the discussion and development of Latin methodologies and research practice. A grasp of Latin is essential to cutting-edge work in medieval and early modern studies but tuition is often hard to come by – we aim to provide CHASE scholars with the necessary skills to produce top-quality research and to form a network of Latin scholars throughout the academy.

Find out more and register here

FACT///.Mapping Feminists Coding Practices Symposium

Wednesday, 20 November 2019 | Sussex Humanities Lab, University of Sussex

‘Mapping Feminists Coding Practices’, a one-day symposium at the Sussex Humanities Lab, University of Sussex, is the first in a series of events that explore feminist coding practices and the historic context of feminism and technology. It explores some of the affordances and resistances of computational technology. Its aim is to develop a wider understanding of current practices and research which make positive interventions into and within computation, in its widest possible interpretation, from a feminist perspective. 

Find out more and register here

Fifty Years of Skinner’s “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas”

Friday, 29 November – Saturday, 30 November 2019 | University of Sussex

This programme takes the opportunity of the fiftieth anniversary of one of the most influential article on intellectual-historical methods, Quentin Skinner’s “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas” (1969), to introduce doctoral participants to the methodological commitments within the field, engaging them in cutting-edge critical reflection on method. Participants will gain a thorough foundation in the available methods in the history of ideas, engage in debates regarding method, and participate in the critical evaluation of such methodologies, considering possible alternatives. 

Find out more and register here

If you have any questions about the above training, please email enquiries@chase.ac.uk

Birkbeck PhD and MPhil Awards August 2019

Birkbeck Research Degrees awarded in August 2019

Birkbeck awards over 100 PhDs each year. In August 2019, eleven Birkbeck Researchers were awarded for their work in the following areas:

School of Arts

Department of English, Theatre and Creative writing

department of film, media and cultural studies

School of Business, Economics and Informatics

Department of Computer Science and Information Systems

DEPARTMENT OF Organizational Psychology

School of Law

Department of law

School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy

DEPARTMENT OF Applied Linguistics and Communication

Department of History, classics and archaeology

Department of Politics

Department of PSYCHOSOCIAL STUDIES

  • 1 DPsych in Family and Systemic Psychotherapy



DANDELION – Call for editors

https://dandelionjournal.org/

Dandelion seeks new EDITORS to assist in the editing of the journal’s new volume. Current Birkbeck School of Arts Postgraduate Students are encouraged to join the Editorial Team for the academic year 2019/20. No publishing or editorial experience is necessary: you will learn editorial skills as you go. Although, if any, these will be a valuable asset.

Your research area should lie within, or across, the fields of: History of Art, Museum Cultures, Film, Media and Cultural Studies, English and Humanities, and Cultures and Languages. You can be at any stage in your research. We are looking for:

General Editors

Suitable for PhD students

General Editors will start the production of the new Volume in the Autumn Term of 2019 (or soon after), and will be responsible for the editorial supervision of the next Dandelion volume. They will be selecting the new theme and writing the Call for Papers, setting the timetable for the issue, commissioning articles, and sharing production management tasks.

Subject Editors

Suitable for MA or PhD students

Subject Editors will be required to edit and copyedit two or three articles (of between 1,500 and 8,000 words); the timing of this work will be confirmed by the appointed General Editors. You will be asked to attend two or three editorial meetings with the rest of the team. You will also be welcome to contribute to events planning, design, typesetting etc. Subject Editors are assigned to articles, and therefore advise contributors, according to their subject area expertise.

Find out more

The outgoing Editors will be happy to meet the new team to discuss the handover and for further advice.
If you are interested then we would love to hear from you. Please send an email expressing your interest in either editorial role, and detailing any relevant experience you may have, by 11th October to mail@dandelionjournal.org. In your email please include details of which research programme you are enrolled in, and the research area you are focusing on. If you have any questions then please do get in touch – we will be happy to answer them.

We look forward to hearing from you.

The editors
Donatella Valente and Jenny Turner
www.dandelionjournal.org

CHASE Essentials

CHASE Essentials

CHASE Essentials training is available to all Arts and Humanities PhD students at Birkbeck, regardless of whether you they are funded by CHASE or not.

About this training

CHASE Essentials is a year-round programme of training and development workshops and residential programmes and is part of the training opportunities available to all arts and humanities doctoral researchers at CHASE institutions.

Arts and Humanities PhD students at CHASE member institutions can apply for expenses using the form here (Word document, best viewed on a laptop or desktop). Approval for the travel claim must be sought in advance.

Other training opportunities are available here www.chase.ac.uk/development

Highlighted AHRC CHASE Training Opportunities

Mining Back: Data Skills for Researching Corporations and Governments

Saturday 14 September | 12:15-13:25
Goldsmiths, University of London | RHB 307  

Dr. Anna Feigenbaum, Principal Academic in Digital Storytelling, Bournemouth University (designed with Tom Sanderson, The Centre for Investigative Journalism)
 
While corporations and governments gain more and more access to our data, ‘researching up’ or investigating governments and corporations is often riddled with obstacles. While the move in recent years toward open data has brought with it increased transparency and information access, not all information is equally available. Critical documents remain hidden behind paywalls, blocked by confidentiality agreements, or deemed too sensitive to be brought into public view. Even when Freedom of Information requests return results, they can come back worded in generalisations or dressed up in retractions.
 
These challenges prompt researchers and campaigners to employ creative methods for legally obtaining data from governments and corporations. In this workshop we bring together key strategies for investigative research, showcasing a range of data sources, as well as freely available and easy to access tools that can be used to ‘mine back’ or obtain and analyse data of government and corporate elites. Geared toward non-coders, qualitative researchers and those with limited budgets and resources, these strategies for ‘mining back’ include advanced searching techniques, data scraping from a webpage, liberating PDF tables, and creating visual power-maps.  
 
This workshop will focus on the reproductive technologies industry in the UK, but most of the skills and resources we will introduce are adaptable across any research project engaged in investigating corporations or governments. 

Students wishing to attend please email with confirmation: grace.tillyard@gmail.com

CHASE Latin for Medieval and Early Modernists 2019/20

Monday 4 – Friday 8 November 2019 & Monday 10 – Friday 14 June 2020 (plus two single day workshops – TBC)

The CHASE Latin for Medievalists and Early Modernists course is a series of workshops and residential weeks designed to provide Latin tuition from beginner to intermediate levels, as well as facilitate the discussion and development of Latin methodologies and research practice. A grasp of Latin is essential to cutting-edge work in medieval and early modern studies but tuition is often hard to come by – we aim to provide CHASE scholars with the necessary skills to produce top-quality research and to form a network of Latin scholars throughout the academy.

Residential week 1 will be held from Monday 4th to Friday 8th November 2019 and residential week 2 will be held from Monday 10th to Friday 14th June 2020, both at UEA. Two single-day workshops will take place in London between the residential weeks with dates TBC. Please note that accommodation for the residential weeks is booked in advance, and so if you subscribe to a residential week and are subsequently unable to attend it is important to notify us as soon as possible.

The skills developed in this course over the past two years have enabled CHASE researchers to pursue previously unavailable avenues of research, and besides structured language tuition we include classes on palaeography and archival research to ground our linguistic work in practice.

Although this course primarily teaches on classical Latin it will feature texts from a wide range of historical periods and is suitable for medievalists, early modernists, and scholars from any background whose research engages with the language.

Register here

Interrogating the Archive

Thursday 18 July, 10.00 – 18.00

This one day conference, organised by the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research (BISR) will consider questions of authorship and power within the archive, and how the materials contained within them can be mobilised from their static locations and repurposed within academic, artistic, radical or imaginary frameworks.

A series of short talks, panel discussions and performances given by academics, students and archival professionals will consider archival materials from various perspectives; asking what is at stake in instituting an archives, how archives might be repurposed as political acts, and the ethical dilemmas of dealing with sensitive sources. A series of short performances from current and former Birkbeck students will explore the ways in which archives can be created, imagined, and used to empower marginalised groups. Finally, a group of archival specialists from Bishopsgate Institute, George Padmore Institute, MayDay Rooms and Wellcome Collection will each explore their individual collections and the ways these can be used in academic research and beyond.

Attendees are asked to apply to attend the workshop and visit with one of the four archives, as best fits their academic research and interests. Applications should include a brief outline of their research and some details as to why the workshop and visit would be beneficial to them. We ask that these applications do not exceed 700 words. Places are limited, so we advise early application. Students will be required to give a brief presentation (5-10 minutes) during the first workshop to explain their research and interests to their peers and the archival specialist present.

Further information

  • Further information is available below
  • Please register via the event page here.