Using an educational neuroscience approach to improve maths and science achievement in primary school

Safina Akram, MA Creative Writing student, shares her experience of attending Birkbeck academic Dr Iroise Dumontheil’s lecture, that took place as part of the lecture series celebrating 100 years of Birkbeck joining the University of London.

Dr Iroise Dumontheil

I recently chose to spend my evenings at Birkbeck trying something different. I’d heard about Birkbeck’s 100th anniversary lecture series, celebrating 100 years of the College being part of the University of London.  And being a Birkbeck student on an MA Creative Writing course, I thought, why not?  It’ll be fun, something different and you never know I might learn something.

I entered the Clore building, to be greeted by the traditional lecture room.  George Birkbeck – what would you think of your Birkbeck now?  I wonder.  What would you think of me coming through these doors?  And what would you think of this lecture series?

The topic, you ask? ‘Using an educational neuroscience approach to improve maths and science achievement in primary school’ by Dr Iroise Dumontheil, Reader in Cognitive Neuroscience at Birkbeck.  Quite a mouthful and yet in one hour, this topic will be justified, explained and I would walk out of this room having been enlightened on what it was all about.

The lecture began, and it was interesting to hear how the series of lectures came about, that each school chose its speaker and the topic.  Dr Iroise Dumontheil was an articulate, informed and mesmerising speaker.  She had grace and elegance, and I was enthralled by the way her hands moved.  They conveyed her passion for her topic and we, her audience, were in safe hands, as step by step, we were led through her research.

The research took a ‘A stop and think approach.’  It’s interesting that neuroscience is working to understand how our minds work and what it is we can do to change the way we think.  Dr Dumontheil spoke about humans having a rational side and an intuitive side and the difference between the two.  She also talked about how the study was spread over different schools in the UK, the inclusion of children from lower socio-economic groups and the number of schools that took part. I took it all in, for it was captivating that research too is like a story.

Dr Iroise Dumontheil's lecture

The questions came from different parts of the room.  The inevitable cross examination of the sample size was there at the end.  This was followed by a question about the data.  Why such an impact on Year 5 and Year 6 children?  This is what education is about, ultimately, questions and answers.

We left the lecture hall and gathered around the table decked with drinks and snacks. I found myself conveniently next to someone, and so we began talking.  She was an alumna, a grandmother, who like me had commuted to Birkbeck that day.  We talked about the lecture, ate a few crisps, she told me how she too had been a student here.  She explained the impact it had made to her life, and how she had been interested in this lecture because she has grandchildren and wanted to understand what the research indicated.  I remember looking around, as people mingled and talked, from such diverse backgrounds, with their unique histories, here they were, in this space.

Reflecting now, I enjoyed the experience, I appreciated the opportunity of learning about something I hadn’t studied.  I liked hearing the stories of others, the people on the stage, and the ones in the audience too.  It led me to booking a place on the other 100th anniversary lectures, hearing from speakers Sir Ed Davey, Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats, on the climate emergency; Baroness Helena Kennedy QC on the rule of law, I remember her passion and how it was infectious, for at the end of that lecture I too wanted to be like her; and Professor Dame Marina Warner, Re-imagining Place, Re-weaving Story, one word is all I have, inspiring, I dream of being a writer like you.

George, I do believe, you would be rather pleased, if you could see your Birkbeck now.

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The Map is not the Territory: Re-imagining Place, Reweaving Story

Natalie Mitchell, a first-year MA Contemporary Literature & Culture student, shares insights from Professor Marina Warner’s lecture that took place as part of the celebration of the 100-year anniversary of Birkbeck joining the University of London.

City of women map by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro

Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, ‘City of Women 2.0’, 2019. Courtesy: the artists

Professor Dame Marina Warner took her audience on a fascinating journey through the role of mapping in storytelling and memory, in her lecture, which forms part of the 100 Years of the University of London lecture series. Using Alfred Korzybski famous axiom ‘the map is not the territory’, which suggests that a map cannot encompass the true quality of a place, Professor Warner considered the re-imagining of place and how mapping can become a rebellious act.

She began the lecture considering the many roles of cartography in territory making, defining borders, resources, military and governance, and how this informs our memory of place. The map attempts to ‘actualise history’ through naming, marking and dividing, but the construction of history is a type of narrative. A point Professor Warner emphasised through the words history and story, which are the same in many languages. As such, mapping can control the narrative of a place and becomes an important tool for colonisers, although it may bear little resemblance to the reality of a place by its indigenous people.

Adam Dant – Shoreditch as New York – 2018

The activity of creating maps can also realise fiction, such as the detailed fictional maps in the novels Gulliver’s Travels and The Lord of the Rings. Similarly, star maps give mythical gods a presence in reality through the stargazer’s eye and theme parks and Disney castles parody real locations through the child’s imagination. In this way, the fictional locations of stories can become real locations; these narratives ‘folding back’ onto the actual.

Professor Warner went on to suggest that the map can function in time as well as space, making the past present. This was particularly notable in Emma Willard’s mapping of aboriginal tribes in America and her Progress of the Roman Empire, charting time using the course of the Amazon river. These reworkings of maps can also perform a ‘historical resistance’ as seen in Layla Curtis’ NewcastleGateshead collaged map of all the places renamed after those cities, which highlights the colonial activity of claiming places through naming. Such use of cartography revealed the potential rebellious nature the renaming of maps can perform.

Artist Mona Caron and cartographer Ben Pease - Monarchs and Queens - 2010

Artist Mona Caron and cartographer Ben Pease – Monarchs and Queens – 2010

This type of resistance was expanded further by Professor Warner through many recent examples of the renaming and reworking of maps and places. In Paris in 2015, Osez le Feminisme flyered the city’s street signs, renaming them to notable women from history. Artists have also reimagined places via the redrawing of maps, such as Rebecca Solnit’s and Adam Dant’s maps, which create a visual narrative, questioning the authority of the map and returning to a cartography blending art and science. Similarly, Simon Patterson’s iconic reworking of the London tube map in his work The Great Bear renamed the stations after a myriad of famous and forgotten figures from history. Through each of her examples, Professor Warner showed how the reimagining of the map ‘makes the familiar unfamiliar’ and how a sense of place can be reclaimed by those in situ.

Simon Patterson - The Great Bear - 1992

Simon Patterson – The Great Bear – 1992

Professor Warner’s lecture was bookended by her recent work with a collective of young migrants in Palermo, Sicily, through the Stories in Transit workshop project Giocherenda. These workshops involved the young people developing stories of the city using the figure of The Genius of Palermo, a 15th century icon who has become a synonymous symbol of the city. The workshop took place around the city, where the young people placed the historical figure in different locations. Through this, they could develop their own sense of their new home in Palermo, but through the use of the city’s history. She expressed how it was the children who wanted to use mapping in their story creations and in doing so created a sense of belonging in an unfamiliar place.

Professor Warner concluded her lecture by emphasising the importance of continuing to create stories. Storytelling is an action and a way of history-making and in the days of fake news and big data, it is even more paramount.

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BBK x SWUFE SUMMER SCHOOL 2019

BBK SWUFE Summer School

On the 29th of July, Birkbeck welcomed twenty students to London from the Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE) of Chengdu, China. These students were the first to arrive and experience Birkbeck’s student lifestyle as part of the joint bachelor’s degree programme between Birkbeck and SWUFE.

“From their cultural ‘English Insights’ classes to punting on the river Cam, the SWUFE students were exposed to everything British, everything Birkbeck and more.

On a sunny Monday afternoon, Andrea Williams, William Richards and Xiaohong Chen greeted the arriving students at Heathrow airport; jet-lagged and bleary-eyed from their twelve-hour flight. With a quick stop-off at the student halls and a welcoming tour of Bloomsbury, the Summer School swung into action from day one.

For two weeks, the visiting SWUFE students experienced the beauty of Bloomsbury, the inclusive Birkbeck student lifestyle and the wider wonders of London. From their cultural ‘English Insights’ classes to punting on the river Cam, the SWUFE students were exposed to everything British, everything Birkbeck and more.

During their first full day in London, the SWUFE students received a ceremonial welcoming from Professors Philip Powell and Kevin Ibeh. Shortly after the formalities however, a red 1960s Routemaster bus gave the SWUFE students a whirlwind tour of London’s sights.

A red 1960s Routemaster bus gave the SWUFE students a whirlwind tour of London’s sights

“A red 1960s Routemaster bus gave the SWUFE students a whirlwind tour of London’s sights.”

As part of the two-week programme, Ms Narelle Hassell presented a series of guest lectures surrounding British culture and ‘English Insights’. SWUFE students were exposed to cockney rhyming slang, Punch & Judy, Sherlock Holmes and even the British obsession with pubs. As a point of order, the students were then treated to an evening at The Marquis Cornwallis where they sampled British ‘pub grub’ and a pint besides Russel Square. Fish and chips certainly proved popular!

To compliment Narelle’s fascinating lecture series, the students were guided in exploring several iconic sites in England; the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, the grounds of the Tower of London, the Greenwich observatory at sunset and a day exploring the enchanting streets and waterways of Cambridge. A spectacular ride on the London Eye topped-off the outings with the students having their own BBK x SWUFE capsule.

Birkbeck’s academics and alumni equally played a key role in shaping the SWUFE experience during the Summer School. Guest lectures from Dr Geoff Walters, Ms Andrea Picazo and the Birkbeck Students’ Union gave the SWUFE students an insight into academic seminars, student support services, and extra-curricular activities on campus. Practicalities were covered too; London’s employability and the range of student housing options were presented by Ms Catherine Charpentier and Ms Lucy Crittenden.

Whilst the two-week programme allowed the SWUFE students to explore London and enjoy a taste of the Birkbeck student experience, their real adventure begins in the Autumn of 2020 for a full year of studies with Birkbeck. In wishing farewell, each of the students were presented with a certificate and a unique Birkbeck gift at this year’s closing ceremony in the Keynes Library. A fabulous high tea at the British Museum then saw them through to the end of this year’s summer school.

"The real adventure begins in the autumn of 2020 for a full year of studies with Birkbeck."

“The real adventure begins in the autumn of 2020 for a full year of studies with Birkbeck.”

The BBK x SWUFE Summer School has proved to be an instant hit as Birkbeck and SWUFE develop their special partnership. Andrea Williams and the School of Business, Economics and Informatics would like to thank all students and staff who helped in making this a summer school to remember.

As for 2020, the bar has been set high…

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Birkbeck brings Higher Education to union learners

On Wednesday 26th June, Union Learning Reps (ULRs) and organisers from unions, including PCS, Unison and USDAW came together for Birkbeck’s first ULR Skills Workshop on the theme of bringing Higher Education to union learners. In this blog, event organiser Sophie Swain of Birkbeck’s Access and Engagement (A&E) reflects on the day and the importance of trade union engagement.

My role as Access and Outreach Officer (Adult and Community) involves supporting trade union members with their transition into higher education.  Alongside Birkbeck’s 10% fee discount for trade union members, I coordinate an outreach programme providing information, advice and learning activities for trade union members who do not currently have a qualification above level 4 or whose jobs may be affected by automation.

This outreach work reflects the importance of the trade union movement in promoting learning and development, and I work closely with officials and reps who are involved with supporting trade union members to access further learning.

Together with a toolkit produced in conjunction with unionlearn, June’s event is intended to be the first in a series with the aim of equipping ULRs and organisers with useful knowledge and skills to both help them in their role and in providing advice and guidance for members considering studying at university.

Following an introduction to Birkbeck, attendees at the event took part in a coaching skills session led by Head of Access, Sahar Erfani, in which they were able to put into practice new techniques for supporting members to explore their options around further study. Andrew Liddell from Birkbeck’s Development and Alumni department spoke about Degree Apprenticeships at Birkbeck and Lucy Crittenden of Birkbeck Futures ran a session on how to promote the benefits of higher education to employers. Emily Harber and Andrew Jones of Linking London led an interactive workshop on the various higher education qualifications and the many different entry levels and to finish a number of attendees took part in a campus tour led by a member of Team Birkbeck.

Feedback from attendees was overwhelmingly positive. Sue Lapworth, ULR at PCS’s Criminal Justice Branch in Croydon said “I really enjoyed the event, it was good to learn what Birkbeck can offer our members and to look round the University. I enjoyed networking with other ULRs and the staff at the college, I am in a better position to advise members who may be interested.” Another event is planned for the Autumn.

To find out more about the union outreach work taking place at Birkbeck, email union-learning@bbk.ac.uk or visit http://www.bbk.ac.uk/professional-services/access/trade-union-outreach

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