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Anthony Bale on Chris Kraus, I Love Dick

Anthony Bale on Chris Kraus, I Love Dick ‘Men still do ruin women’s lives’. Chris Kraus, I Love Dick Over the summer holidays I try to read books I’ve been meaning to read for a while. This year was no exception; I had been meaning

Isabel Davis on Jang Jin-sung, Dear Leader

Isabel Davis on Jang Jin-sung, Dear Leader Jang Jin-sung’s Dear Leader is an astonishing memoir, translated for the English reader by Shirley Lee. The author is an exiled dissent, now living in South Korea, who spent years as an official writer for the North Korean

Joseph Brooker on Philip K. Dick, A Maze of Death

Joseph Brooker on Philip K. Dick, A Maze of Death The science fiction writer Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) published novels from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s, so A Maze of Death (1970) comes early in the second half of that career. Dick’s fictional universes

Daragh Carville on Michael Hughes, The Countenance Divine

Daragh Carville on Michael Hughes, The Countenance Divine To say that The Countenance Divine, the debut novel by Northern Irish writer Michael Hughes, is ambitious would be an understatement. Taking as its point of departure the story of a computer programmer battling both the Millennium Bug

Martin Eve on William Gaddis’s JR

Martin Eve on William Gaddis’s JR I am currently re-reading William Gaddis‘s monstrous 1975 novel, JR. While this is a book that defies easy plot summary, one of the central strands of the text concerns the eponymous eleven-year-old schoolboy, J. R. Vansant, and his adept manipulation

Roger Luckhurst on Basma Abdel Aziz, The Queue

Roger Luckhurst on Basma Abdel Aziz, The Queue  Dystopian fiction pours off the presses in such volume that the apocalyptic vision has become codified and oddly routine. It’s the end of the world as we know it and we feel fine. But for all the

Joseph Brooker on Ghostbusters (2016)

What is a ghost? Stephen said with tingling energy. One who has faded into impalpability through death, through absence, through change of manners. James Joyce, Ulysses Ghostbusters (1984) came from nowhere when I was a boy: a blockbuster whose scenario didn’t seem to resemble anything that

Joseph Brooker on Graham Swift, Mothering Sunday

Joseph Brooker on Graham Swift, Mothering Sunday Mothering Sunday (2016) is Graham Swift’s tenth novel, if an 132-page novella counts. This is a kind of historical fiction, centring on one day: Mothering Sunday, March 30th 1924.  For the novella’s purposes the significance of the holiday

Alison Finlay on Cnut Conference 2016

Prof. Alison Finlay on Cnut Conference, London 2016 As academics meet their overseas counterparts over the summer conference season, wry comments about Europe and its constituent parts, back-stabbing and betrayal among rulers, regime change and political upheaval will have been woven into many a conference