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Category: Video

Records of War: Film, History and the Art School

Conny Klocker, intern at the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) and PhD candidate at the School of Law writes on a recent screening of 1930s propaganda film.  As part of the UCL Festival of Culture, the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image (BIMI) was showing two propaganda films about the Italian invasion in Abyssinia in 1935/36 according to a programme first presented at the London Film Society in 1937. One film depicted a Soviet account of the events from the Abyssinians’ perspective, the other from the invaders, the fascist Italian perspective. The screening itself presented a difficult task for the two projectionists, who…

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CLUES, HISTORIES, MYSTERIES AND MYSTORIES

by Billy Stanton On the 28th of April the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image hosted “Clues, Histories, Mysteries and Mystories”, an event dedicated to essay films focusing on international, personal and familial history in the first-person mode; what was demonstrated by the films shown and the speakers arguments was the potential held by this specific form to probe and present suppressed and buried histories, both general and individual. San Sabba  The event opened with an introduction from the chair Professor Catherine Grant, before a screening of San Sabba, a 2016 documentary by Dr. Romana Turina. Dr Turina followed the screening by discussing her work and…

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BIMI University of Pittsburgh Annual Lecture

BIMI University of Pittsburgh Annual Lecture 28th of November 2014 Michael Temple presents “Decades Never Start on Time”, an anthology of Richard Roud’s critical writing. Watch the complete lecture here or listen to it by clicking on the image.

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Final Words on Horace Ove– Laura Mulvey and Sasha Roseneil

Hailed as Britain's first black feature film, Pressure is a hard-hitting, honest document of the plight of disenchanted British-born black youths. Set in 1970s London, it tells the story of Tony, a bright school-leaver, son of West Indian immigrants, who finds himself torn between his parents' church-going conformity and his brother's Black Power militancy. As his initially high hopes are repeatedly dashed – he cannot find work anywhere, potential employers treat him with suspicion because of his colour – his sense of alienation grows. In a bid to find a sense of belonging, he joins his black friends who, estranged from their submissive parents, seek…

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Introduction to Pressure: A Tribute to Horace Ove

Hailed as Britain's first black feature film, Pressure is a hard-hitting, honest document of the plight of disenchanted British-born black youths. Set in 1970s London, it tells the story of Tony, a bright school-leaver, son of West Indian immigrants, who finds himself torn between his parents' church-going conformity and his brother's Black Power militancy. As his initially high hopes are repeatedly dashed – he cannot find work anywhere, potential employers treat him with suspicion because of his colour – his sense of alienation grows. In a bid to find a sense of belonging, he joins his black friends who, estranged from their submissive parents, seek…

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Talk: The Cultural Politics of Horace Ove

Hailed as Britain’s first black feature film, Pressure is a hard-hitting, honest document of the plight of disenchanted British-born black youths. Set in 1970s London, it tells the story of Tony, a bright school-leaver, son of West Indian immigrants, who finds himself torn between his parents’ church-going conformity and his brother’s Black Power militancy. As his initially high hopes are repeatedly dashed – he cannot find work anywhere, potential employers treat him with suspicion because of his colour – his sense of alienation grows. In a bid to find a sense of belonging, he joins his black friends who, estranged from their submissive parents, seek…

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Talk: Horace Ove: Documentary Filmmaker

Horace Ove is a Trinidadian-born British filmmaker, painter and writer and one of the leading black independent film-makers to emerge in Britain since the post-war period. Ove’s first film, Pressure, which tells the story of a London teenager who joins the Black Power movement in 1970’s, was banned for two years by its own backers, the British Film Institute (BFI). Other works include the 1978 documentary The Skateboard Kings, about pioneering Californian skateboarders Tony Alva and Stacey Peralta. Ove’s 1986 film, Playing Away starring Norman Beaton, is perhaps his most well-known work. The film centred around the residents of fictional British village Seddington, who invite…

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Talk: Horace Ove and Television

Continuing with footage from the Horace Ove Symposium, this recording brings together contributions from Peter Ansorge (producer 'Empire Road') and Jim Hawkins (script-writer 'A Hole in Babylon'). This session is chaired and introduced by Janet McCabe. This session is built around two works by Horace Ove. The first work focuses on in this session is  A Hole in Babylon (1979) http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id a piece made by Ove as part of the long-running anthology series A Play for Today. This can be watched in full here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NH7EUS9zFY. The second drama addresed is The Orchard House (1991) http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/570201/index.html. This is a four part period drama produced for Channel…

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Talk: The Cultural Politics of Horace Ove

With Julian Henriques, Robert Buckler and Laura Mulvey. Horace Ové was born in Belmont, Trinidad and Tobago, in 1939. He came to Britain in 1960 to study painting, photography and interior design. After working as a film extra in Rome, he returned to London to study at the London School of Film Technique. He began work on Man Out, a surreal film about a West Indian novelist who has a mental breakdown. The project was never completed, but in 1966 Ové directed The Art of the Needle, a short film for the Acupuncture Association. This was followed by another short, Baldwin's Nigger (1969), in…

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The Self-Portrait in the Moving Image

The Self-Portrait in the Moving Image 28 February and 1 March 2014 This event reassessed the practice of self-portraiture in the moving image by showcasing and discussing a broad variety of films, including works by Robert Kramer, Aleksandr Sokurov, Jonas Mekas, Vincent Dieutre, Jack Hazan, Chantal Akerman, Jean-Luc Godard, Agnes Varda, and Sarah Turner. Introduction to 'The Self-Portrait in the Moving Image' by Laura Mulvey Introduction to 'The Self Portrait in the Moving Image' by Michael Temple Roundtable discussion Muriel Tinel-Temple, ‘The self-portrait in experimental cinema’ Marlène Monteiro, ‘Vincent Dieutre’s Leçons de ténèbres:…

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