Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group – 29th November 2018 3pm: Schizophrenia

The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group will meet on 29th November 2018, 15:00-16:30, in the Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD to consider work on the topic of schizophrenia. This session will be led by Dr Mohammed Rashed, ISSF Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow in Birkbeck’s Department of Philosophy, and the readings are as follows:

  • Colin King (2006) They diagnosed me a schizophrenic when I was just a Gemini. In ‘The other side of madness’. Reconceiving Schizophrenia. Edited by Man Cheung Chung, Bill Fulford, and George Graham (Oxford UP)
  • Angela Woods (2011) Schizophrenia, modernity, postmodernity. In Woods, The Sublime Object of Psychiatry: Schizophrenia in Clinical and Cultural Theory (Oxford UP)

The readings for each session are held in a shared Dropbox folder. If you need access, email sophie.jones@bbk.ac.uk (include your Dropbox-linked email address, if you have one).

Everyone is welcome at the reading group. There is no need to book.

The Birkbeck Medical Humanities Reading Group aims to create a space in which academics, clinicians and students can come together to explore key readings, ideas and materials in the field of medical humanities. Our endeavour is to find ways of talking across the different disciplines of the humanities and medicine, and we welcome participation from colleagues and students interested and engaged in these areas. For details of previous sessions, please click here.

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CFP: Aesthetics of Kinship and Community Graduate Symposium deadline 30 October 2018

Aesthetics of Kinship and Community Graduate Symposium

Birkbeck, University of London

Friday 30 November 2018 – afternoon

Call for Papers

Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) is a research centre based in the School of Arts. We study the artistic representation of human belonging, of the human bond, in literature, film, photography, paintings, and other art forms. How is this bond presented across time and cultures, how is it analysed, deconstructed, reinvented?

We are inviting postgraduate students to present their current research within the field of aesthetics of kinship and community for a roundtable event at Birkbeck on 30 November 2018 in the afternoon. The idea is to bring together the wealth of research being accomplished on the artistic representation of the familial, the social, the political, its criticism and re-conceptions. Papers can be on any period in history and all cultures are relevant. Issues upon which papers are welcome include but are not limited to:

  • Racism
  • Sexual belonging
  • Familial configurations
  • Nationalisms and Brexit
  • Diasporas
  • Utopia(s)
  • Community and commonality
  • Anticapitalism
  • Revolutions

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr Nathalie Wourm, Director of BRAKC, by 30 October 2018. Selected papers will be announced shortly after that.

Email: n.wourm@bbk.ac.uk

Website: http://www.brakc.bbk.ac.uk/

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School of Arts Research Student Writing Sessions 2018-19

The School of Arts Writing Sessions will be running again this year, on Mondays and Fridays from 10am to 1pm. All research students and staff are welcome to attend: the sessions are designed to give researchers at all levels some time, space and peer support for focused work on extended writing projects.

You can attend as often as you like: if you think you would like to come at any point, email Sophie Jones to be added to the mailing list. Every Friday, Sophie will send out a sign-up sheet for the following week with details of the room.

More information about the structure of the sessions is available on the group’s web page.

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Vacancy: BBK Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies seeks a Postgraduate Intern Deadline Extended 5th October 2018

Vacancy: BBK Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies seeks a Postgraduate Intern Deadline 5th October 2018

Vacancy: Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies:

Postgraduate Intern

Deadline Extended to 5th October 2018

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies seeks a Postgraduate Intern

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies invites applications from postgraduate research students studying at Birkbeck for an Internship to support and develop the activities of the Centre:

The Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

The Centre was first established in 1997 under the directorship of Professor Isobel Armstrong originally to bring together researchers in English, History of Art and History.  It has since developed a reputation for its diverse events that attract national and international scholars. It hosts the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies, which sees speakers coming to Birkbeck throughout the year; it runs the successful annual Dickens Day; and organizes and hosts major conferences, workshops and symposia. The Centre also supports Postgraduate students wishing to organise and run their own events.

THE POSITION

  • This Events Officer internship for the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies trains a student to develop, advertise, run, archive and curate a programme of public events:

PLANNING:

  • Collect and generate ideas about speakers, emerging questions, and formats for events (Nineteenth-Century Forum, workshops, day conferences, etc);

IMPLEMENTING:

  • Timetabling and scheduling, including liaising with Centre staff and speakers
  • AV/IT: identifying speakers’ needs, liaising with relevant school AV/IT staff, booking and setting up IT
  • Helping setting up speaker events in the Keynes Library and ensuring that it is returned to its original seating after the talk;
  • helping to organise refreshments where appropriate;
  • administering speaker expenses.

CENTRE’S WEBSITE:

  • Overseeing and updating the website on a weekly basis; ensuring that all events are listed with appropriate links and any other relevant material;
  • team-working skills: coordinating website updates with the editorial interns on the online journal 19 to ensure that the Centre and Journal websites support reach
  • developing a dedicated PG /postdoc area of the website to showcase/advertise p/g activities(entering student’s activities in the website, such as the 19th reading group, conferences, blogs, etc.).
  • Producing, archiving, and curating materials related to events and research activities

NETWORKS/PUBLICITY:

  • Developing and overseeing strategies for the Centre’s profile on social networks (twitter, Facebook, etc);
  • Producing, coordinating, and editing the Centre’s Blog, including commissioning and overseeing blog submissions, and liaising with relevant staff.
  • Networking and linking researchers at different stages in their career
  • Fostering and coordinating links between staff and the postgraduate community within the centre and its research clusters
  • Developing a publicity strategy (sending information of Centre’s activities to other nineteenth-century websites; identifying and contacting other communities of practitioners to enhance interdisciplinary reach of the Centre’s activities).

INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS:

  • Centre meetings – Attend and take minutes at termly Centre meetings; liaise with Centre Director/s about minutes/actions.

ELIGIBILITY:

  • We invite applications from postgraduate research students from across the College with interests in the nineteenth century. Applicants should expect to be enrolled as students at Birkbeck until end of September 2019

SELECTION CRITERIA

Essential

  • Research interests in Nineteenth-Century Studies
  • Organizational and clerical skills
  • Independence and initiative

Desirable but NOT essential

  • organization of research activities such as Reading Groups, Seminars or Conferences
  • Involvement in the activities of the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies
  • Social media skills

REMUNERATION:

£16 per hour. The hours will be agreed on a flexible basis with the Centre Directors (spread across three terms to work out at an average of 3.5 hours per week for 35 weeks)

APPLICATION:

Please email a letter of application, outlining your reasons for applying for the post, and a CV, together with the name of your supervisor, from whom we will require a reference, to Dr Victoria Mills (v.mills@bbk.ac.uk) in the School of Arts by 5.00pm on Friday 5th October 2018

Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed shortly thereafter (date tbc but likely to be Tuesday 9 October)

Please direct any enquiries to Dr Victoria Mills (v.mills@bbk.ac.uk).

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Vacancy C19: Postgraduate Editorial Intern in Academic Publishing Online – deadline extended 5 October 2018

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

seeks a Postgraduate Editorial Intern in Academic Publishing Online

The Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies invites applications from Birkbeck’s postgraduate research students for an Internship in Academic Publishing Online to manage our web journal:

19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century

(www.19.bbk.ac.uk)

Deadline for application: 5.00pm on Friday 5 October 2018

The Journal

Launched on 1 October 2005, 19 is an electronic publishing initiative originally designed to publicize and disseminate the research activities carried out by Birkbeck’s Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, and to provide practical research and professional development opportunities for the many postgraduate students undertaking research degrees in nineteenth-century studies at the College. The journal is now housed in the Open Library of Humanities https://www.openlibhums.org, allowing free and open access to its contents. It is fully peer-reviewed and aggregated with NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship). It is now recognized and respected as a leading journal in the field, known for exciting, leading research and as an innovative and field-setting example of Open Access practice.

The Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

The Centre was first established in 1997 under the directorship of Professor Isobel Armstrong originally to bring together researchers in English, History of Art and History.  It has since developed a reputation for its diverse events that attract national and international scholars. It hosts the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies, which sees speakers coming to Birkbeck throughout the year; it runs the annual Dickens Day; and organizes and hosts major conferences, workshops and symposia. The Centre also provides opportunities for Postgraduate students to organise and run events.

The Position

The postgraduate editorial internship in Academic Publishing Online trains a student to manage 19, working with another intern under the supervision of the journal’s General Editor, Dr Carolyn Burdett, its section Editor, Dr Victoria Mills, and the Editor for systems, Dr David Gillott, and with the guidance of the Editorial Board. The appointee will participate fully in the day-to-day running of the journal and help manage the Centre’s website.  Responsibilities include maintenance and resourcing of 19 and the Centre’s website; liaising with and between guest editor, authors and publisher; overseeing the smooth operation of the peer review system; supporting authors in securing image permissions; copy editing essays and other submitted materials; aiding the proofing processes; promoting and publicizing the journal; and taking an active role in web publishing initiatives, including innovation to increase the journal’s reach and influence. The postholder will be supported and mentored by an intern already in post and, in turn, will mentor the next intern. There will also be Centre-focused activity, including curation of the Centre’s presence in social media and elsewhere, and help with blog initiatives; contributing to the archiving of the Centre’s work; and participation in initiatives with postgraduate students working in the nineteenth century. Postholders will attend Centre meetings, and will be expected to be active participants and, where appropriate, helpers in the Centre’s programme of seminars, conferences and symposia.

Eligibility

We invite applications from postgraduate research students from across the College.  Research interests in the nineteenth century are desirable but not essential, though we would expect applicants to have some interest in the period. Applicants should expect to be enrolled as students at Birkbeck until end of the academic year 2019-20. Exceptionally, students in their first year of MPhil/PhD can be appointed but the norm will be for students to have completed their first year of study.

Selection Criteria

Essential

  • Excellent literacy skills
  • Organizational and clerical skills
  • Independence and initiative
  • Good communication skills

Desirable but NOT essential

  • Research interests in Nineteenth-Century Studies
  • Web authoring and design skills
  • Experience in electronic publishing
  • Editing experience
  • Organization of research activities such as Reading Groups, Seminars or Conferences

Remuneration

£16.00 per hour. The hours will be agreed on a flexible basis with the General Editor (spread across one calendar to work out at an average of 3.5 hours per week for 35 weeks)

Application

Please email a letter of application, outlining your reasons for applying for the post, and CV, together with the name of your supervisor, from whom we will require a reference, to Dr Carolyn Burdett (c.burdett@bbk.ac.uk) in the School of Arts by 5.00pm on Friday 5 October 2018.  Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed early on in the autumn term (date tbc).

Please direct any enquiries to Dr Carolyn Burdett (c.burdett@bbk.ac.uk).

 

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GRiT: Graduate Research in Theatre 2018-19 programme of events

We would like to invite you to this year’s GRiT: Graduate Research in Theatre events. GRiT is our termly research seminars, featuring presentations by visiting scholars, faculty and graduate students.

Please note down the dates below, and let me know if you have any questions: s.ilter@bbk.ac.uk

  • 28 Nov, 4-5pm (Keynes Library): Prof Dr Alyson Campbell (University of Melbourne)
  • 13 Feb, 4-5pm (Room 106): Daragh Carville (Lecturer in Creative Writing at Bbk, playwright and screenwriter)
  • 20 March, 4-5pm (106): Sasha Dovzhyk (PhD at Bbk – working on the Victorian artist Aubrey Beardsley in early 20th century Russia)
  • 8 May, 4-5pm (106): Hannah Barton (PhD at Bbk – working on internet memes as discourse strategies within a networked culture)

It would be wonderful to see you at these events, and I’d appreciate if you could circulate it amongst your peers.

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CFP: BRAKC Research Centre 2018-19: Deadline 30 September 2018

Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) is a research centre based in the School of Arts. We study the artistic representation of human belonging, of the human bond, in literature, film, photography, paintings, and other art forms. How is this bond presented across time and cultures, how is it analysed, deconstructed, reinvented? BRAKC was established ten years ago and since then we have organised many conferences, symposia, seminars, reading groups, exhibitions, interrogating the concepts of “family”, “kinship”, and “community”.

We would like to encourage interested research students in the School of Arts to play a prominent role in the activities of the centre. We invite proposals for research events in 2018-19. Some funding is available if needed for the organisation of these events. Although organisers will not be paid, they will have something to add to their CVs!

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words to Dr Nathalie Wourm, Director of BRAKC, by 30 September 2018. Selected proposals will be announced shortly after that, and the events will be organised in cooperation with BRAKC.

Email: n.wourm@bbk.ac.uk

Website: http://www.brakc.bbk.ac.uk/

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Bill’s Big Birthday Bash: An Evening of Readings in Celebration of Bill Griffiths 20 August 2018

Monday 20th August. Doors 6:30pm, readings from 7pm. In the Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck University of London, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD. Free admission, all welcome with no need to book.

 

Bill Griffiths (1948-2007) was a poet, publisher, translator, archivist, Anglo-Saxonist, prisoners’ rights activist, biker, classical pianist and much more. He was born in Middlesex and was primarily based in the London area before moving to Seaham, County Durham, in 1990. Monday 20th August 2018 would have been his 70th birthday. The Contemporary Poetics Research Centre at Birkbeck and the Poetics Research Centre at Royal Holloway are pleased to announce an evening of readings to mark the occasion and celebrate Griffiths’ achievements. Refreshments provided. This event will feature:

  • Mendoza and Peter Manson reading to launch their new collection WINDSUCKERS & ONSETTERS (SONNOTS for Griffiths). Published by MATERIALS (UK) / MATERIALIEN (Germany), this collaboration is inspired by Griffiths’ research into the lexicons of County Durham’s fishing and mining communities.
  • A collaborative performance by poets Geraldine Monk (who has described Griffiths as her ‘very first poet friend’) and Alan Halsey (editor of Griffiths’ three-volume Collected Poems, published by Reality Street, 2010-2016).
  • A talk by poet and historian John Seed about Griffiths’ life and lexical research in County Durham, plus a reading from Seed’s own poetry about the region.
  • An opportunity for audience members to read excerpts from Griffiths’ work, share their own poems in response to his accomplishments, or speak about their memories of this remarkable writer – if you would like to participate in this segment, please honour a time limit of two minutes, so that everyone has a chance to contribute.
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Birkbeck Nineteenth-Century Reading Group – 2018/19 Sessions

The Birkbeck Nineteenth-Century Reading Group meets in Room 106 on Tuesdays at 6.00. We are a friendly group and always welcome new members.

The dates and texts for 2018-2019 are:

  • October 9th: Anna Karenina (Tolstoy)
  • November 6th: Under Western Eyes (Conrad)
  • December 4th: What Maisie Knew (James)
  • January 8th: A Tale of Two Cities (Dickens)
  • February 5th: Stories by Rabindranath Tagore, texts to be advised.
  • March 5th: The Age of Innocence (Wharton)
  • April 2nd: Poetry of James Henry, texts to be advised.
  • May 7th: Fathers and Sons (Turgenev)
  • June 4th: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Stevenson)
  • July 2nd: Bartleby the Scrivener (Melville)

For further information contact Susie Paskins susiepaskins@googlemail.com

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Thinking Through Writing – ‘thinking and writing in the arts’

Thinking Through Writing

Jennifer Moriarty, MPhil Candidate in the Department of English and Humanities, reports on a recent workshop that brought together researchers to discuss the relationship between thinking and writing in the arts.

 

In the early days of my PhD, my supervisor told me that ‘writing is how we work out what we think about things’. I nodded — hopefully sagely — and wrote it in my notebook, not really grasping the significance of the statement. Then I went away and promptly struggled to write my first chapter. A constant stream of academic memes reminding me that I ‘should be writing’ seemed merely to underline that, unless writing was ceaseless, it was never enough. But, I began to think about how writing, if it truly was a means of understanding my own creative input, should be deployed alongside the reading of inputs produced by others. Did ‘writing’ mean writing or was the word used as shorthand for a more nebulous combination of reading/writing/thinking? Seeking greater insight into this balancing act, I attended several ‘academic writing’ workshops in which speakers largely addressed questions of how to unblock the mind that already knows what it thinks or how to use the predefined structure of the scientific PhD document to galvanize writing. While I did learn some practical tips about structuring sentences and paragraphs, my questions about the writing process as a way to generate ideas went unanswered. None of these sessions got at the heart of how to use writing to synthesize existing research and original ideas within the context of the arts-based thesis. Using the training-needs-analysis document as a catalyst to articulate my questions, I was delighted when Luisa Calè, the Assistant Dean for the School of Arts, identified that guidance on the use writing to generate thinking was lacking in the training provision and that deeper scrutiny of the writing process would be of interest to students across the School.

On 2 July, researchers came together in a day-long ‘Thinking Through Writing’ workshop that offered a mixture of advice from experienced writers and practical hands-on writing sessions. What we learned — spoiler alert— is that the process of writing is difficult and there is no one-size-fits-all approach. But feedback from attendees said that hearing about others’ methods and finding solidarity among peers facing the same struggles offered fresh perspectives and rejuvenating energy. The message reiterated throughout the day was that writing and thinking are inspired as much by reading as they are seemingly non-academic activities like exercising, baking, or listening to music.

Panel 1 — Thinking through writing: approaches to composition

An initial panel presented the reflections of three writers on their process of writing from different fields.

Mark Blacklock, drawing on his experience as a journalist, novelist, and academic writer, encouraged attendees to think of critical writing as a process of responding to something, for example, a primary source or a historical idea. Among the steps he outlined for generating ideas were:

  • The ‘first mark’—get over the blank page as quickly as possible by breaking ground with handwritten notes in notebooks or margins or books. Once digitised, these notes can be searched, often throwing up serendipitous connections.
  • Keywords— brainstorm keywords in response to the primary source then really zoom in on the words and concepts.
  • Sentences— use sentences to add meaning and order to your ideas. Mark mentioned Don DeLillo ‘s practice of writing only one sentence per page in order to leave space to unpack each one thoroughly.
  • Sections— compile granular-level sentences into sections and then rearrange these to see which content is redundant or to identify any gaps
  • Editing— allow some time to pass before editing your own work, but also consider editing others’ work as a means of gaining insight into alternative writing styles.
  • Publishing— commit to publication (journal articles or conference papers) to impose often helpful deadlines on your writing. Mark recommended blogs as a lower-stakes place to practise writing. Blog posts must be good enough to put out before the public, but they don’t need to be up to academic standard.

Sam Dolbear, speaking from his experience of writing his PhD, discussed several tactics that he employed to find ideas in his own writing. Sam suggested rearranging sentences either electronically or by printing out and cutting them apart to speak new connections. Importantly, Sam emphasized that the writing process is difficult and can involve as much failure as productivity. Introducing an idea that would be reiterated throughout the day, Sam noted that distraction often serves as a productive force, enabling the mind to process ideas. Activities away from the desk, such as walking, cycling, or going to the cinema can often trigger reflective modes of thinking, but no one approach would suit everyone.

Emily Baker took up this idea, drawing a parallel between the processes of writing and musical composition. While Mozart wrote by thinking through his entire work before drafting and made infrequent adjustments to his core ideas afterwards, Beethoven’s approach was to consider each note as it was influenced by those preceding it and to make endless improvements even after publication. Emily recommended a hybrid approach of planning and chance tailored to suit each individual writer’s temperament. She noted that some people react productively to self- or supervisor-imposed deadlines and benefit from outside accountability, but others are more likely to rebel and won’t find motivation in these pressures. Emily also recommended the Forest app as a tool to help resist the temptation to be distracted by social media or other websites while writing.

Music proved a rich metaphor and topic of discussion. Bach’s method of ‘counterpoint’—where one melody responds and interacts with another within the same piece— was suggested as a helpful way to think about dialogic forms of writing. Others noted that pieces of music listened to repeatedly while writing can become associated with arguments or chapters, providing a useful trigger for returning to an earlier train of thought. Max Richter’s Sleep (2015) and the website Noisili were mentioned as examples of neuroscience being used to inform compositions designed to aid concentration, productivity, and/or relaxation.

Pomodoro

In the first of two writing sessions, the group participated in a ‘Pomodoro’. Named after the tomato timer, Pomodoro refers to a time-management technique that recommends using 25-minute intervals of concentrated effort to break tasks into smaller chunks, followed by 5-minutes of break. When sitting down to write, many people find themselves distracted by their surroundings or daunted by what they want to achieve. Others sit for hours without taking a rest.  By setting a writing goal for the time period and knowing that there is a built-in time afterwards in which distraction is permitted, writers applying the Pomodoro technique say that it helps to increase focus and productivity.

Panel 2 — Writing Feelings

In the afternoon, the group discussed the feelings that writing engenders. Many people expressed a combination of frustration/anxiety intermixed with feeling of elation/accomplishment. Others expressed guilt at not writing but also about writing, that arts research wasn’t considered to be ‘real’ work.

Julia Bell encouraged attendees to use the productive energy of anxiety to foster creative bursts of active writing. She attributed this anxiety to the paradox of writing within an environment structured by beats of the clock— scheduled events in our lives, like deadlines— while at the same time reflecting on timeless or historic matters.  Using Kurt Vonnegut’s ‘Shapes of Writing’ metaphor, Julia drew a comparison between writers and characters in a novel, both subject to time-bound existence but also affected by thoughts and motivations that sit outside of time. She also suggested that students’ anxiety can spring from concerns that their readers are more knowledgeable than they are, but she encouraged them to take confidence from their work at the coalface and their familiarity with the latest research in their field. While it’s important to be prepared to face an external examiner, that person’s expertise may have been built 10 or 20 years earlier.

Julia pointed out that academic work is embracing elements of creative writing, including a willingness to incorporate the writer’s own experience as evidence and writing in the first person.

‘Shut Up and Write’

In the afternoon, the group completed a one-hour ‘Shut Up and Write’ session. Despite its aggressive name, the longer silent writing session was greeted with enthusiasm by participants. Many enjoyed the feeling of solidarity of writing within a group, knowing that others were also working toward similar goals, and the feeling of accountability group writing fostered, given the social pressure to prevent them from being distracted. Several participants reported being more productive in the day’s short writing sessions than they had in days or weeks!

If you’re interested in group writing, Birkbeck offers a number of opportunities. The Birkbeck Graduate Research School often runs shut up and write days, and Sophie Jones runs a twice-weekly writing group during term times, which is open to researchers at all stages. Please contact Sophie for more details or to be added to the group’s email list.

The Uses of Procrastination

In the final session of the day, historian Emma Lundin, from the podcast Tomorrow Never Knows (with Charlotte Lydia Riley), took up the idea that procrastination can be productive. She reiterated the importance of knowing yourself and, whenever possible, identifying times of day and environments that make thesis writing easier. Often, however, commitments to family or work can impose restrictions on when and where writing takes place. Emma cited Toni Morrison and Nick Laird who discuss how to fit writing around other commitments and also encouraged writers to see time away from writing as ‘thinking time’. Activities like baking cookies or watching movies may feel like procrastination but can offer the mind a chance to consider any problems obliquely or subconsciously. Emma also recommended the use of other writing outlets— blogs, a podcast— to create lower-pressure opportunities to practise writing and to rejuvenate the writer. Twitter, ordinarily considered a distraction from writing, can be used productively as a place for collecting and recording ideas, as well as a forum for conversation with the wider community.

Scrivener offers a digital solution for writers who tend to want to edit what they have already written instead of continuing to write, because earlier work can be ‘hidden’, and writers are encouraged instead to compose chunks of text in any order for later compilation or rearrangement.

So, it seems that maybe we shouldn’t always be writing. To give space for thinking, research can and ought to encompass opportunities at and away from the desk for making connections between ideas and readings. The process of writing can encompass ‘positive procrastination’ as an opportunity for creative and problem-solving parts of our mind to process information. Writing in shorter but more focused sessions, perhaps even with other people, may also increase productivity and help to maintain motivation throughout the thesis.

Resources

De Lillo, Don, ‘The Art of Fiction’, Paris Review, 128 (Fall 1993), https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/1887/don-delillo-the-art-of-fiction-no-135-don-delillo

Dunleavy, Patrick, Authoring a PhD: How to Plan, Draft, Write and Finish a Doctoral Thesis or Dissertation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003)

Explorations of Style, A Blog about Academic Writing: https://explorationsofstyle.com/2011/02/09/reverse-outlines/

Hertzmann, Eric, ‘Mozart’s Creative Process’, The Musical Quarterly, 43:2 (1957), 187-200

Kindermann, William, Beethoven’s Compositional Process (University of Nebraska Press, 1991)

Laird, Nick, ‘My lists say things like 1. buy milk. 2. call Dad. 3. finish novel’, Guardian, 27 June 2017
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jun/27/nick-laird-my-writing-day

Morrison, Toni, ‘The Art of Fiction’, Paris Review, 128 (Fall 1993) https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/1888/toni-morrison-the-art-of-fiction-no-134-toni-morrison   

Sword, Helen, Air & Light & Time & Space: How Successful Academics Write (Harvard University Press, 2017)

Wolff, Christoph, ‘Composed, Just not yet Written: on Mozart’s Creative Process’, Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 52: 4 (1999), 28-31

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