Napoleon Harlequin: Theatre and the Battle for Legitimacy, 1814-15 – 10 June 2019

Lecture by Professor Katherine Astbury

 Napoleon Harlequin:

Theatre and the Battle for Legitimacy, 1814-15

 6 -7.30pm, Monday 10 June 2019

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square. WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a forthcoming lecture by Kate Astbury, Professor of French Studies, University of Warwick.

After the allies entered Paris at the end of March 1814, the city witnessed a flood of pamphlets and prints denouncing Napoleon as ‘tyrant’, ‘monster’, ‘assassin’ and ‘comedian’. This final ‘crime’ might, at first sight, seem somewhat out of place but the battle for legitimacy that was taking place hinged on who had the greater claim to rule France, Napoleon or Louis XVIII. To accuse Napoleon of being a charlatan and an actor merely playing a part was to undermine his right to reign and it thus becomes a repeated element of royalist attacks on the person of the Emperor.  It would however, also be a weapon Napoleon’s supporters could turn to their advantage and this paper will outline the ways in which theatrical metaphor was used by both sides in 1814-15.

The lecture will be followed by questions, and drinks.

All are very welcome!

For further information, please contact Dr Ann Lewis: a.lewis@bbk.ac.uk

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Thinking (about) Automata in Descartes, Shaftesbury, and Diderot – 20 May 2019

Lecture by Dr. James Fowler

Thinking (about) Automata in Descartes, Shaftesbury, and Diderot

6 -7.30pm, Monday 20 May 2019

Keynes Library, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square. WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a forthcoming lecture by James Fowler, Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Kent.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, discussions of the soul in the secular sphere involved thinking about automata, and whether they might think. Breaking with Aristotle, Descartes uses the cultural phenomenon of automates (such as those he viewed at Saint-Germain-en-Laye) to suggest that, quite simply, all non-human animals are ‘bêtes-machines’. Shaftesbury is strongly opposed to this: refuting Descartes and Malebranche, he argues that all animals – including humans – should only be viewed as ‘clockwork’ when they are seized by fits. By contrast, Diderot (an admirer of Vaucanson) argues, in support of materialism, that humans can usefully be imagined as animal-machines – or indeed as living statues. This tendency in Diderot can be traced in his early (1747) translation of Shaftesbury, in which the automaton, as ‘automate’, is introduced where it least belongs: in the English Earl’s thought experiment concerning a ‘solitary creature’.

 

All are very welcome! Please note: this event is part of Birkbeck Arts Week 2019.

To reserve your free place, and to see the full programme of events, please go to:

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/annual-events/arts-week/arts-week-2019

 

For further information, please contact Dr Ann Lewis: a.lewis@bbk.ac.uk

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CFP: Productive Futures – Deadline 31st May 2019

Call For Paper: Productive Futures

12 – 14 September

The history of science fiction (SF) is a history of unreal economics: from asteroid mining to interstellar trade, from the sex-work of replicants to the domestic labour of the housewives of galactic suburbia, from the abolition of money and property to techno-capitalist tragedies of the near future.

 

LSFRC invites abstracts of 300 words, plus 50 word bios, addressing economic themes in SF, and/or exploring how SF can help to widen and evolve our sense of the economic. We encourage submissions from collaborators across disciplines and/or institutions.

 

For the full length call for papers, and more information, please visit www.lsfrc.co.uk or email lsfrcmail@gmail.com

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Corkscrew Podcasting Lecture – 30 May 2019

Corkscrew Podcasting Lecture
Led by Dr. Dario Llinares (d.llinares@brighton.ac.uk)
Thursday 30 May 2019, 12-13.15pm
Location: GORB03

12:00 PUBLIC LECTURE by Dr. Dario Llinares: Podcasting Praxis: Questions of Research and Knowledge through Aural Mediation.

Bio: Dario Llinares is Principal Lecturer in Contemporary Screen Media at the University of Brighton, UK. His current research focuses on the status and practice of cinema-going in the digital age, and on podcasting as a practice-research method. He is co-editor of Podcasting: New Aural Cultures and Digital Media (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) and co-founder and co-host of the very popular and esteemed Cinematologists podcast.

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Screening and Symposium about the film 120 BPM – 10 May 2019

Screening and Symposium about the film 120 BPM

10 May 2019 – 6.00 – 9.00pm

The screening takes place at Queen Mary, University of London on Friday the 10th of May. It will be followed by a roundtable with a fantastic lineup of speakers and a wine reception. See speaker details below.

– Ben Walters (a writer who blogs about moving-image, queer and DIY cultures @not_television & recently completed a PhD on nightlife collective Duckie at Queen Mary)
-Ray Malone (co-founder of the NHS Anti-Swindle Team, the founder of The Fallout Club and ACT UP activist)
-Lo Marshall (who works with the UCL Urban Laboratory on a project researching LGBTQI nightlife spaces in London from 1986 until the present).

The symposium will take place at King’s College, London on Saturday the 11th of May and will focus on diverse and interdisciplinary responses to 120 BPM, including panels on ‘Queer Histories / Activisms’, ‘Colour’, ‘Dance, Sound, Rhythm, Community Building’, ‘Digital Technologies and Virtual Reality’ and ‘Death, Dust, & Plastics’ and a keynote by Dr Fiona Johnstone, whose publication AIDS & Representation: Portraits and Self-Portraits During the AIDS Crisis in America is forthcoming in 2019.

FILM SCREENING:

Friday, May 10th

6.00 – 9.00pm at the Hitchcock Cinema, ArtsOne, Queen Mary, University of London.

FREE, BOOK HERE:   https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/120-bpm-film-screening-and-panel-tickets-59883719818?aff=erelconmlt

SYMPOSIUM: 

Saturday, May 11th
10.30-5 at the Anatomy Lecture Theatre, Kings College London
FREE, BOOK HERE:   https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/120-bpm-symposium-tickets-59883604473

We are extremely grateful for the support of our sponsors the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies (BAFTSS), The Society for French Studies (SFS) and The Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (ASMCF).

To find out more about the conference please go to 120BPMsymposium.wordpress.com or our twitter feed @120BPMSymposium.

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Other possible stories. Rethinking the collections of the Museo de Arte de Lima – 3 May 2019

The Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies and the Centre for Museum Cultures cordially invite you to the talk:

Other possible stories. Rethinking the collections of the Museo de Arte de Lima

Natalia Maljuf

Friday, 3 May, 2019

5PM-7PM

GOR 106, 43 Gordon Square

School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

This presentation attempts to account for the work carried out by a group of curators and experts at the Museo de Arte de Lima over the past two decades. It explores the challenges of incorporating historical and contemporary objects within a panoramic survey collection that spans cultural production in the Andean region from the pre-Columbian period to the present. This effort has confronted the museum with notions of art, time and place that establish oppositions between crucial categories of museological classification: high and popular culture, art and craft, history and ethnography, tradition and modernity, the local and the global. These issues are discussed through examples of specific collecting and research projects related to forms of cultural production traditionally excluded from the museum’s narratives.

Natalia Majluf, currently Simón Bolívar Chair at the University of Cambridge, 2018-2019, is an art historian who works on the long nineteenth century in Latin America, from the era of Independence to the early twentieth century. As Head Curator and Director of the Museo de Arte de Lima, between 1995 and 2018 she oversaw the renovation of the historic building that houses the museum and was responsible for enriching and broadening the scope of the collections. She has held fellowships from the Getty Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, D.C. She is editor, among others, of Los incas, reyes del Perú (2005), Luis Montero’s The funerals of Atahualpa (2011), José Gil de Castro, pintor de libertadores (2014) and has co-authored Tipos del Perú. La Lima criolla de Pancho Fierro (2008), Fernando Bryce. Drawing Modern History (2011), Sabogal (2013) and Chambi (2015), among other books and exhibition catalogues.

All welcome, attendance free but booking here necessary.

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CFS: Close Writing – A Salon of Texture – 29 April 2019

Close Writing

Close Writing is a project that wants to explore our textured life through writing. We want to create a space in which contributors from all disciplines and backgrounds can come together to investigate, complicate and question the affects, repercussions and lived experience of texture.

For each salon, we will give a texture accompanied by some prompts, and ask our contributors to respond to it through writing, image, or sound. We will then share our work at a relaxed, critical reading salon, the first will be held in late Spring/early Summer (location and date tbc).

Our first texture is sticky. What does it mean to feel something sticky? Why is a sticky surface so repugnant but simultaneously so alluring? What does it mean for thoughts, ideas, or bodies to stick together? Below are some writing prompts that circle around the subject of sticky that you can use if you wish.

Please send your sticky writing as an attachment to closewritingsalon@gmail.com by the 29th April, labelling the attachment with your name and the title of your work. It can either be a finished piece of around 1300 words or in draft stages. Please also include a bio. Once we have selected we will get back to you to arrange our first reading salon.

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New Approaches to Writing History – 9 May 2019

New Approaches to Writing History: A panel discussion with Bart Van Es, Sarah Knott, and Barbara Taylor,  jointly hosted by the IHR and the Raphael Samuel History Centre.

Thursday 9th May 2019, 6.30 – 8.00pm

Clore Lecture Theatre, Clore Management Centre, Birkbeck College, London WC1E 7JL

Reception to follow

 

Booking essential; book here (www.history.ac.uk/events/event/19545)

 

Join Costa Book winner, Bart Van Es, and the feminist and historian, Sarah Knott, to discuss new approaches to writing history.

Once characterized by its authorial distance and dispassion, history is open to ever-greater experiment as a written form. The rise of first-person narration, the merging of history with memoir, the appeal of ‘non-fiction fiction’, and the historian’s place as agent of research, or even subject within the past, are all reshaping how academic history is being written, read and enjoyed.

In this event we’ll discuss the reasons for, and outcomes of, this greater fluidity of form. How do we explain a new readiness to experiment; what does a fusing of genres mean for historical values; can form shape method and understanding of the past; and where next for experimental history writing? Commenting on these topics are three highly successful practitioners of innovative history.

Bart Van Es is professor of English Literature at Oxford University. His latest book, The Cut Out Girl: A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found (Penguin), won the 2018 Costa Book award earlier this year. Part memoir of friendship, part family history, The Cut Out Girl opens into a detailed study of the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands and the networks that supported the hiding of Jewish children. To the Evening Standard this is ‘a masterpiece of history and memoir’.

Sarah Knott is associate professor in history at Indiana University and the author of Mother. An Unconventional History, published by Penguin in March 2019. The study of mothering from the seventeenth to the late twentieth century, Mother is an ‘unconventional history’ in its use of first-person as the means to undertake historical research, and in its piecing together of past mothering from anecdotal fragments born of interruptions.

They’re joined by Barbara Taylor (QMUL) who will lead the conversation with Bart and Sarah. Barbara is professor of humanities at Queen Mary, University of London, and the author of The Last Asylum. A Memoir of Madness in our Times (Penguin, 2014).

 

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CFP: Journal of Arts Writing – Deadline 22 April 2019

JAWS: Journal of Arts Writing by Students Volume 5 Issue 1

JAWS is the only academic arts journal run by and dedicated to MA and PhD students (and those who have recently graduated). We have published work by students from India, China, Australia, North America, Canada and the UK, and maintain an international peer-review network.

What We Want:
Theoretical and discursive essays up to 6000 words.

Critical reviews of events, exhibitions or performances up to 3000 words.

Submissions of practice accompanied by text. The word count for this type of submission can be negotiated through the peer review and editing process, but we recommend between 3000–5000 words. We strongly recommend authors consult our peer review guidance for unconventional submissions on our website prior to submitting, please see the link below.

All work must be sent in as a Word document to
rob@jawsjournal.com, and be prefaced with a 100-word abstract and 6–8 keywords, followed by a short contributor biography. Please include your university affiliation, full name, course and year of graduation. All work must use Harvard referencing, following Intellect House Style. For full submission guidelines and information about the peer review process we employ, please refer to
www.jawsjournal.com/submissions.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 22 April 2019.

Volume 1 Issue 1 is available for free at:
www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/jaws/

Our guest editorials from previous issues are also available, including those by Professor Arnold Aronson (Columbia University), Dr Sophie Hope (Birkbeck), Dr Inger Mewburn (the Thesis Whisperer), Professor Joseph Heathcott (The New School of Design) and Professor Malcolm Quinn (CCW Graduate School):
https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=243/

For all inquiries please email rob@jawsjournal.com.

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CFP: New Configurations of Contemporary Women’s Writing – 9 September 2019

New Configurations of Contemporary Women’s Writing

Postgraduate Contemporary Women’s Writing  Network 7th Biennial Conference

Monday 9th September 2019, The University of Hull

 

The last two years have seen a renewed vigour amongst women to testify to their experiences and protest their causes.  Shouts of #metoo and #timesup have chimed with quieter revisionings of a female-identifying imaginary.  These voices sound out in contemporary women’s writing just as the literature itself offers a language and a form with which to speak of the shifts – a back and forth between politics and women’s writing that is not new, but speaks of an enduring engagement with the current political mood.

New Configurations asks: How does contemporary women’s writing inhabit and convey the texture of our moment?  How does it envisage the future? And, how does current formal innovation shape the future of women’s writing? Alongside this the conference seeks to consider how we might rethink the scope of our field, regarding questions of inclusivity and critical methodologies.

The 2019 PG CWWN Conference invites proposals from Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers for 15 minute papers, creative or creative-critical contributions. We also welcome proposals for panels or round-tables involving 3-4 people. We explicitly invite papers on texts by female-identifying, femme, transgender and non-binary authors as well as cis-gendered women writers.

Abstracts (250 words) and biographical notes (150 words) should be sent by 7th June 2019 to pgcwwn2019conference@gmail.com

Confirmed Keynote: Joanna Walsh (Seed, break.up, Vertigo, Hotel, Grow a Pair).

Conference Fee: £30 including lunch, dessert and refreshments

Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Gender/Queerness/Reconfiguring binaries/Identity
  • Posthuman/Transhuman
  • Sexuality/Intimacy/Embodiment/Love
  • Maternity/Childlessness/Conjugality/Kinship
  • Utopia/Dystopia/Ecological/Post-Apocalyptic
  • Place/Migration/Nationalism/Cosmopolitanism
  • Disability/Mental Health/Trauma
  • Care/Self-Care
  • Pain/Disease/Gerontology
  • Precarity/Vulnerability/Mortality
  • Conflict/War/Genocide
  • Protest/Feminism/Activism
  • Memoir/Autofiction/Essay/Confessional
  • Experimental Writing/Innovation/Genre
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